Search for media geminata verbs

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Volker Herrmann | Forum Activity | Posted: Wed, Jul 8 2020 1:29 AM

Hello dear logos professionals,

I am quite new to logos and am looking for a way to search for media geminata verbs in the books of Moses. I don't find this in the morph search or I overlook something.

Many thanks for the help and have a great day

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 11 2020 6:57 PM

7 bump

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 11 2020 7:34 PM

Volker Herrmann:
I am quite new to logos and am looking for a way to search for media geminata verbs in the books of Moses.

Welcome Big Smile

Curious about definition of "media geminata verbs" ? (currently have no idea what to search for: Hebrew, Arabic, ...)

Basic search in all resources for: media NEAR geminata found one resource in my library => Topics in Hebrew and Semitic Linguistics that mentions "Arabic media geminata" once in a chapter about: “Weak” Phonetic Change and the Hebrew śîn

4.3 Irregular Sound Correspondences of Hebrew š

Diem (1974, pp. 246–247) calls attention to the existence of Hebrew š, where, according to its correspondences with other Semitic languages, one would rather have expected ś. These cases, in Diem’s opinion, have to be interpreted as exhibiting original ś. Yet because of the want of Aramaic parallels, š, which in genuine Hebrew, in Diem’s opinion, had superseded ś, had been left and not changed to s. Diem himself (pp. 246–247, note 120) felt the weakness of his position, since in these cases he accepted the argumentum ex silentio of the absence of Aramaic parallels, yet not in the case of Hebrew ś. More important, however, in our opinion, is the uncertain and marginal character of this š. In the wake of Yahuda (1903, especialy pp. 707ff), Diem adduces eight words allegedly exhibiting š, where one would have expected ś, five of which, however, exhibit another sibilant alongside š, so that the deviation from regular sound correspondence may well be due to dissimilation. As to the remaining three words, the etymology of Hebrew nāḥās̆ (“snake”) is by no means clear, cf., e.g., Nöldeke (1904, p. 133, note 4) or Fraenkel (1898, p. 80); Hebrew s̆uppȗ (“they have become lean”) may be connected, to be sure, with Arabic s̆ff (“to be transparent”), yet the meeting of two deviations, viz. Hebrew š corresponding to Arabic š, and a Hebrew IIIy verb to an Arabic media geminata, makes one cautious. One would altogether discard Yahuda’s interpretation s̆əlȗḥȏt (“shoots, branches”), Isa 16:8, since it may easily be derived from s̆lḥ (“to send”), cf. Ps 80:12 təs̆allaḥ qəṣîrȇhā ‘ad yām (“she sent her boughs unto the sea”), Jer 17:8 wə‘al yūḇal yəs̆allaḥ s̆orās̆āw (“and it sends out its roots by the river”). (See the biblical dictionaries s.v., who, justly in our opinion, did not even care to quote Yahuda on this passage.) It would have been more expedient to quote a deviant correspondence like Hebrew təs̆ūqā (“longing”) = Arabic s̆awq, in exactly the same meaning and usage (see 3.3 above and note 82). Yet the marginal existence of such deviant correspondence does not prove anything. One must not forget that exceptional correspondences have been claimed also, e.g., for Aramaic , as for Aramaic nəšaq = Hebrew nās̆aq, if it is really related to Arabic nas̆aqa (“to smell”) (see, e.g., Barth, 1893, pp. 46–47; Fraenkel, 1898, pp. 79–80; Barth, 1902, p. 58); Aramaic riḥs̆ā (“reptile”), if it really corresponds to Arabic rās̆iḥ (see Barth, 1893, p. 48; Fraenkel, 1898, p. 80; Barth 1902, p. 58); Aramaic nes̆bā (“net”), if related to Arabic našiba (“to stick”) (see Fraenkel, 1886, p. 120; Barth, 1893, p. 50). Although this exceptional correspondence (Aramaic š—Arabic š) is not less established than Hebrew š—Arabic š, it cannot be inferred from it that Aramaic or Arabic š have come into being through foreign influence. Weak phonetic change is well attested in Semitic languages (cf. Section 1), accordingly, nothing can be inferred from marginal deviations in sound correspondence for Hebrew š either.

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Steve Maling | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jul 12 2020 9:28 AM

  geminate. n. A doubled consonant or a verb with a doubled consonant.
  geminate verbs. n. Weak verbs with identical second- and third-position consonants in the *triliteral root; also called double-ayin verbs. Technically they are *biconsonantal roots that have doubled the final letter to accommodate verbal *inflection (e.g., סבב). Joüon §82; MNK §18.9; GKC §67.


Todd J. Murphy, Pocket Dictionary for the Study of Biblical Hebrew, The IVP Pocket Reference Series (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2003), 77.

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Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jul 12 2020 3:20 PM

Volker Herrmann:
I am quite new to logos and am looking for a way to search for media geminata verbs in the books of Moses. I don't find this in the morph search or I overlook something.

Steve Maling:
geminate verbs. n. Weak verbs with identical second- and third-position consonants in the *triliteral root; also called double-ayin verbs. Technically they are *biconsonantal roots that have doubled the final letter to accommodate verbal *inflection (e.g., סבב). Joüon §82; MNK §18.9; GKC §67.

If that definition applies to 'media' geminate verbs then one can only search for specific double consonants  e.g. <Lemma ~ lbs/he/?בב> INTERSECTS <LogosMorphHeb ~ V????????> where the ? in ?בב indicates any value for the first-position consonant.

Dave
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Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jul 12 2020 5:09 PM

Steve Maling:
geminate verbs. n. Weak verbs with identical second- and third-position consonants in the *triliteral root; also called double-ayin verbs. Technically they are *biconsonantal roots that have doubled the final letter to accommodate verbal *inflection

Expanded Dave Hooton's search example to include more biconsonantal final letter lemma verbs using Bible Search in Lexham Hebrew Bible

(<Lemma ~ lbs/he/?שׁשׁ> OR <Lemma ~ lbs/he/?סס> OR <Lemma ~ lbs/he/?חח> OR <Lemma ~ lbs/he/?דד> OR <Lemma ~ lbs/he/?גג> OR <Lemma ~ lbs/he/?בב>) INTERSECT <LogosMorphHeb ~ V????????>

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Posts 6
Volker Herrmann | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 16 2020 9:25 AM

Thank you very much for your help. Finally it worked :-)

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