Question for speakers of Hebrew

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Posts 948
Armin | Forum Activity | Posted: Sat, Aug 15 2020 6:06 AM

One of the reasons why I love Logos is that it allows me to (at least try to) use original languages without speaking any of them. 

While studying Genesis, I tried to determine if both, the tree of life and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, were in the middle of the garden. The NIV seems to interpret it such that both trees were in the middle of the garden:

     In the middle of the garden were the tree of life and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. 

      The Holy Bible: New International Version. (1984). (Ge 2:9). Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan.

However, looking at the interlinear Hebrew/English OT, this does not seem to be obvious. For me, it sounds like the tree of life was in the middle of the garden, but this verse does not state that the tree of the knowledge of good and evil was also in the middle of the garden. Only in the next chapter, Eve states this.

Can somebody familiar with Hebrew can comment on this?

And as a second question: How can I as non-Hebrew speaker figure this out in L8?

Posts 137
Thomas Pape | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Aug 15 2020 8:33 AM

For questions like this, I like to look at Messianic Package.

"The JPS Torah Commentary" Page 18-19
and
"Ariel’s Bible commentary: the book of Genesis" Page 76-77

Posts 359
Andrew Biddinger | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Aug 15 2020 8:52 AM

Looks like the LPOG thinks so:

You can find this by selecting the "Propositional Outlines" under Resource.

Posts 11214
Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Aug 15 2020 9:45 AM

I don't think you'll get a clear answer. WIVU and Andersen-Forbes treat the TOK similar to JPS-Gen (Thomas' post), as an add-on (independent ellipsis). The Targums and LXX just repeat, without trying to untangle. But the Latin takes the same path as the NIV.

Regarding your non-hebrew, questions like this over-define the limits of both hebrew, and greek. In the case of hebrew, you're looking at a long string of consonants, later untangled with traditions and guesswork. In greek, the flexibility of 'glue-words' make hard translations iffy.

"God will save his fallen angels and their broken wings He'll mend."

Posts 1401
HJ. van der Wal | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Aug 15 2020 10:04 AM

Thomas Pape:

For questions like this, I like to look at Messianic Package.

"The JPS Torah Commentary" Page 18-19
and
"Ariel’s Bible commentary: the book of Genesis" Page 76-77

v. 9 tells us that “the tree of life” was “in the middle of the garden,” implying that “the tree of knowledge of good and bad” was not there; yet in 3:3 Eve tells the snake that the latter tree was also “in the middle of the garden.” In truth, weren’t all the trees “in the midst of the garden”?

The Commentators' Bible is a valuable resource if you want to take a look at traditional Jewish exegesis:

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