How to search for the topic of kingdom in Logos 4

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Jim | Forum Activity | Posted: Sat, Jul 17 2010 11:20 AM

I'd like to find some references that discuss the concept of kingdom. Not facts about the word usage in the Bible, but more philosophical or abstract. Along the lines of why does God talk about a Kingdom, how is the concept rooted in the nature of God and His creation, why kingdom vs other forms of governance or societal organization etc.

In L4 I can search for the word, but it going to take me hours if not days to wade through all of them, even if I restrict the search to theological manuals/books.

Perhaps someone knows a good resource to start with or can suggest a way to go about searching for this topic in Logos.  I have something close to the Scholar's basic library.

Have a great day,
jmac

Posts 19689
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 17 2010 11:28 AM

In the command bar, type lookup kingdom.

This will find you a first stab at a definition or encyclopedia article on it (depending on your prioritizations).

Now click the + tab to the right of the tab that just opened.

This will give you a list of all your resources that have a keyword entry for "kingdom" (it'll be the list on the right side of the panel, not the list of book cover icons).

This will probably include some articles on the nature of kingdom as a sphere of influence or form of governance.

It might not be the end of your quest to understand the concept better and how God's Kingdom relates to human kingdoms, but it will be a big start in the right direction.

Posts 5637
Todd Phillips | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 17 2010 11:42 AM

Rosie Perera:

Now click the + tab to the right of the tab that just opened.

This will give you a list of all your resources that have a keyword entry for "kingdom" (it'll be the list on the right side of the panel, not the list of book cover icons).

An alternate way to see those same resources is to right click on the word kingdom (after you've looked it up), and select Power Lookup from the menu.  (I don't know why we can't do a Power Lookup on a word from the command bar).

The Power Lookup window will show you the beginning of each of the entries (usually). Be sure to set the Power Lookup window's Link Set to "None", so the results do disappear as you mouse around the screen.

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Todd Phillips | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 17 2010 12:07 PM

Rethinking this:

I would suggest running the Bible Word Study on the English word kingdom as a good starting move.  It also shows you the same resources as above, and it shows you the words translated as kingdom in the Hebrew and Greek (the Holman Treasury of Key Bible Words is in Scholars).  Then, from the first BWS you can run another Bible Word Study on the Greek word to find discussion of it in whatever theological dictionaries you might have.  Scholars has Theological Dictionary of the New Testament, and Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament.

By the  way, I suggest looking up "king" and "kingship" as well.  "King" seems to get the best hits.

---

You can also do a Basic search on the Library, and get topic hits (as you can see king gets more entries than kingdom).  The topic search is limited in the dictionaries it can search, which is why the other methods are suggested.

 

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 17 2010 12:22 PM

I'd start with Dictionary of Biblical Imagery by Leland Ryken, Jim Wilhoit, Tremper Longman, and Colin Duriez and plan my strategy from there.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 5637
Todd Phillips | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 17 2010 12:28 PM

MJ. Smith:

I'd start with Dictionary of Biblical Imagery by Leland Ryken, Jim Wilhoit, Tremper Longman, and Colin Duriez and plan my strategy from there.

Which is part of the IVP reference collection.  If he only has Scholar's, then he won't have it.

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Jim | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 17 2010 4:03 PM

All of this has been quite helpful. Thanks Rosie, Todd and MJ.  I do have the DBI. Must have purchased it separately. All of your suggestions worked and I'm going to have to process these techniques so I'll know to use them in the future.Idea

Have a great day,
jmac

Posts 681
Jim | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 17 2010 4:33 PM

When I do a basic search for 'kingdom', I get absolutely no hits under the Topic group (it doesn't even appear). A search for 'king' did come up with a few interesting dictionary entries. Your alternate words gave me the idea of looking for 'government' and that turned out to be quite interesting for my purpose. For this inquiry, the usage of the Hebrew and Greek words are not all that interesting to me. 

Doing Rosie's suggestion of command > "lookup kingdom" and using Power Look Up seem to give more of the kind of results I'm after.

Is there a way to do Power Lookup without first highlighting the word in a Biblical text? It doesn't have a text entry box at the top of the pane.

Also I notice that Bible Word Study Guide doesn't have the same info as Power Lookup. Any thoughts on why?

Have a great day,
jmac

Posts 19689
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 17 2010 5:05 PM

Jim:

When I do a basic search for 'kingdom', I get absolutely no hits under the Topic group (it doesn't even appear).

 

When I do this I get only one hit, in ISBE (the 1995 edition):

Evidently you don't have that resource. It didn't come with any base package. I had to buy it separately. The fact that there aren't more entries there probably means not many articles have been tagged with "kingdom" in LCV (Logos Controlled Vocabulary). Many of the resources I found using the + tab technique were not ones I'd expect to have been tagged with LCV (English dictionaries), and others must be ones they haven't tagged yet.

The entry in New International Encyclopedia of Bible Words was the most helpful, I think (I hope this counts as fair use; I'm not including the entire entry (truncated just the last little bit), so you'll have to buy the resource if you want it all Smile. But this should give you an idea of how valuable a resource it is; it's not that expensive either):

KINGDOM

The NT tells us that Jesus came preaching a gospel of the kingdom. What was his good news? Was that early word of the kingdom only for Israel or does it have meaning for us today? Theologians differ on their answer. But the many references in the Gospels to the kingdom of heaven and to the kingdom of God make one thing clear: Jesus shares significant truth with us when he speaks of the kingdom.

OT   1.   “Kingdom” in the OT

NT   2.   “Kingdom” in the NT

         3.   The gospel of the kingdom

         4.   The present kingdom

         5.   The coming kingdom

         6.   Summary

OT—1. “Kingdom” in the OT. Several Hebrew words are translated “kingdom” in the English versions. They come from the same root as meleḵ, king: maleḵû, maleḵûṯ, and mamlāḵâh. è King

In modern thought, a kingdom is a specific geographical area, with national identity. In the OT, however, “kingdom” is best expressed by the idea of reign or sovereignty. One’s kingdom is the people or things over which he or she has authority or control.

In the OT, “kingdom” is most often used in the secular sense, to indicate the sphere of authority of human rulers. But the Bible does speak of God’s kingdom, in two significant ways.

First, the entire universe is God’s kingdom, for he exercises sovereign rule over all things at this present time. Ps 103:19 affirms, “The LORD has established his throne in heaven, and his kingdom rules over all.” Similarly: “They will tell of the glory of your kingdom and speak of your might, so that all men may know of your mighty acts and the glorious splendor of your kingdom. Your kingdom is an everlasting kingdom, and your dominion endures through all generations” (Ps 145:11–13).

The same theme is developed in Nebuchadnezzar’s praise after he recovered from a madness given as divine judgment: “How great are his [God’s] signs, how mighty his wonders! His kingdom is an eternal kingdom; his dominion endures from generation to generation” (Da 4:3). The overarching sovereignty of God may not always be expressed in mighty acts. It also operates in quiet providence, as history marches toward God’s intended end. But all is God’s kingdom. And he is the ultimate ruler of all (2 Ch 13:8; Da 4:17; 5:21; 6:26–27).

Second, the OT does look forward to a future expression of God’s now-disguised sovereignty. Then the kingdom will have a visible, earthly form. Daniel speaks of a time when “the God of heaven will set up a kingdom that will never be destroyed, nor will it be left to another people. It will crush all those kingdoms and bring them to an end, but it will itself endure forever” (Da 2:44). Essentially the same vision is repeated in Da 7, and the establishment of God’s visible kingdom is again foretold. In fact, OT prophecy uniformly and consistently pictures a time when earth will be ruled by the Messiah, when “the kingdom will be the LORD’s” (Ob 21).

In the OT, therefore, God is seen as the present, though often unacknowledged, ruler of the universe. The universe and everything in it constitute his kingdom, for he exercises sovereign control over all beings. At the same time, the OT anticipates a day when God will establish a visible kingdom on earth. In that day his sovereignty will be recognized, and his authority will be acknowledged by all.

NT—2. “Kingdom” in the NT. The import of “kingdom” (basileia) in the NT is derived from OT thought rather than from Greek culture. A kingdom is a realm in which a king exerts control and authority. The “kingdom of God,” rather than being a place, is the realm in which God is in control.

The OT draws attention to two aspects of God’s kingdom. As king of the created universe, God is always at work, actively shaping history’s flow according to his will. This expression of the kingdom of God is usually hidden. Only at times, as at the Exodus, has God visibly broken into time and space to set his unmistakable imprint on events. But the OT looks forward to a time when God’s Messiah will step boldly into history. Then with raw power he will act to establish God’s open rule over the whole earth. Then Israel’s enemies will be shattered, the Davidic successor established on the throne in Jerusalem, and God will enforce peace on all peoples.

In Jesus’ day, Palestine lay under Roman rule. Rome was only the latest in a centuries-long series of pagan overlords. Understandably, Israel longed for the kingdom the prophets foretold. No wonder Jesus was looked to at first as the one who would establish the prophesied kingdom. Jesus’ own disciples, even late in his ministry and after his resurrection, expected him to establish the visible kingdom soon (Mt 20:21–23; Ac 1:6–7). So when Jesus came, at first preaching the “gospel of the kingdom,” it was natural that he was not understood. His listeners’ perceptions were shaped by their vision of the kingdom to come, and they could not grasp the fact that Jesus actually spoke, not of one of the two OT forms of the kingdom, but of yet another expression of God’s rule, yet another way in which God would act in human affairs.

In reading the NT it is important to remember the basic meaning of “kingdom.” It refers to the realm in which a ruler acts to carry out his will. If we operate from this basic definition, Scripture will break down our stereotypes as well and reveal an exciting aspect of the kingdom of heaven that Christians too often miss.

3. The gospel of the kingdom. When it was time for Jesus to begin his public ministry, John the Baptist began to preach, “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is near” (Mt 3:2). God was about to break into history, to act in a bold, fresh way. This message, which was also the theme of Jesus’ early ministry (Mt 4:17; Mk 1:15), is “the good news of the kingdom” (Mt 4:23).

Jesus’ message was stronger than that of John. John said the kingdom was coming. Jesus announced that it had arrived! Confronting men who accused him of doing his miracles by Satan’s power, Jesus said, “If I drive out demons by the Spirit of God, then the kingdom of God has come upon you” (Mt 12:28; cf. Lk 11:20). Most of Jesus’ miracles belong to this time period, the time of his preaching the gospel of the kingdom. The king had come and had demonstrated his power to act, revealing his authority over every natural and supernatural power. In the NT, the kingdom and Jesus are inseparable, even as the concept of kingdom is meaningless apart from the person of the king.

In a significant sense, then, any announcement of the gospel of the kingdom must focus on the person of Jesus, promising that he is or soon will be present, able to act in all his sovereign power.

There seem to be two periods of time when this particular message is presented. The first is seen in Jesus’ own historic announcement of his presence. Israel was called on to acknowledge the heavenly king and thus by faith step into that realm in which he would freely exercise his power for them (e.g., Mt 3:2; 4:17, 23; 9:35; 10:7; Mk 1:15; Lk 4:43; 8:1; 9:2, 11, 60; 10:9, 11). Jesus summed up this era by saying, “The Law and the Prophets were proclaimed until John. Since that time, the good news of the kingdom of God is being preached” (Lk 16:16).

The second time will be just before Jesus’ return. Mt 24 records Jesus’ answer to his disciples’ questions about history’s end. Jesus reviewed OT prophecy and said of that future time: “This gospel of the kingdom will be preached in the whole world as a testimony to all nations, and then the end will come” (Mt 24:14). It is clear from the context that this preaching is not of the Christian gospel of salvation but is the announcement to all that Jesus is again about to appear on earth.

There are, of course, other NT references to preaching and teaching about the kingdom (Ac 8:12; 19:8; 20:25; 28:23, 31). Thus, the gospel of the kingdom—the good news that the king is at hand or is already present—is preached when Jesus personally is about to, or already has (at the First Advent), stepped into history.

The gospel of the kingdom may be a technical theological term with narrow focus. But the NT teaching about the kingdom itself has a broader significance and touches our lives today.

4. The present kingdom. While he was on earth, Jesus taught much about an expression of the divine kingdom that was unrecognized in the OT. When it was clear that Israel would not accept Christ as Messiah/King, Jesus began to speak of the kingdom in parables. And he began to speak of his death. When asked why he used parables, he told the disciples that “the knowledge of the secrets of the kingdom of heaven has been given to you, but not to them” (Mt 13:11). Matthew points out that Jesus’ use of parables fulfilled the OT: “I will open my mouth in parables, I will utter things hidden since the creation of the world” (Mt 13:35; cf. Mk 4:10–13). It is best to take this “secret” as a previously unrevealed expression of the divine kingdom—a way in which God acts in man’s world that is not known from the OT.

The NT has much to say about this form of the kingdom, for this is the kingdom in which you and I are called to live today.

The present kingdom in the Epistles. Most of what the Epistles have to say about the Christian life does not mention the kingdom. Yet it is clear that believers have been rescued by the Father from the domain of darkness and have been brought “into the kingdom of the Son he loves” (Col 1:13). In Heb 12:28 the writer uses the present active participle to affirm, “We are receiving a kingdom that cannot be shaken.” A number of passages speak of inheriting the kingdom (1 Co 6:9–10; 15:50; Gal 5:21; Eph 5:5; Jas 2:5). With the possible exception of Jas 2:5, the matter of inheritance is viewed in the context of Roman law. At birth a child becomes an heir and has an established right to the possessions controlled by his father. è Inheritance Clearly, the NT presents another kingdom in addition to (1) the universal rule of God through providence and (2) the yet-future kingdom of prophecy (cf. Ro 14:17; 1 Co 4:20; Col 1:12, 13; 4:11; 1 Th 2:12; 2 Th 1:5; Rev 1:6; 5:10). Still, the Epistles say less than the synoptic Gospels do about this other kingdom, possibly because it was necessary for Jesus to speak in kingdom terms before the language of resurrection could be established by his death and coming to life again.

Kingdom lifestyle in the synoptic Gospels. A number of extended passages in the Gospels explore life in Jesus’ present kingdom. Using Matthew’s Gospel as a framework, we see these major teaching passages.

Mt 5–7. The Sermon on the Mount has been interpreted in a number of ways. Is it a salvation message? Was it given to show Christians how they ought to live? Is it a picture of life in Jesus’ future and coming kingdom? Is it a combination of the above? In view of the nature of the kingdom, it seems best to understand this Sermon as Jesus’ statement of how people of every age live when they abandon themselves to God’s will. This last view seems to best integrate the Sermon’s many teachings with the NT’s view of the kingdom.

The Beatitudes describe the values of a person living a kingdom lifestyle (Mt 5:3–12). Jesus then gives a series of illustrations, showing how inner values find expression in lifestyle (5:17–42). As king, Jesus acts to transform the character of his subjects. Jesus in the present kingdom is working in our inner selves to change our outward behavior. Jesus goes on to show how we can experience this transforming power. We focus on our “in secret” relationship with the Lord, not on visible piety (6:1–18). We give priority to seeking God’s kingdom and righteousness, and we trust our Father to supply our material needs (6:19–33). We relate to other kingdom citizens as brothers and sisters and reject every claim of a right to judge or control them (Mt 7:1–14). Instead of relying on human leaders, we rely on the simple words of Jesus and commit ourselves to obey them (7:15–27).

Mt 13. Jesus explained in parables how the present form of the kingdom compares with and differs from the expected, prophetic vision of God’s direct rule on earth. The kingdom teaching of the parables is summarized in the accompanying chart (p. 381).

Mt 18–20. Jesus explains how one becomes great in God’s present kingdom. è Great/Greatness

There are other significant verses and insights. For instance, we read in the Lord’s prayer: “Your kingdom come, your will be done on earth as it is in heaven” (Mt 6:10). In context, this is no prayer for the end of time. It is the believer’s request that for the ability to do God’s will now, here on earth, as it is done in heaven, so that God’s kingdom may find expression in divine acts here and now. The kingdom is the realm in which the king acts with sovereign power. In Christ, you and I can experience that kingdom here and now. We can know God’s power at work in our own lives as we adopt the lifestyle of the kingdom over which Jesus rules.

The theological basis for the present kingdom. It is clear that God’s sovereign touch rules the universe, now and always. So the present kingdom of Jesus does not supersede or replace providence. Yet in speaking of the still-future kingdom over which Jesus will rule visibly, Scripture introduces a unique expression of the divine kingdom. God’s providential supervision of the universe usually leaves him hidden. In the future, however, his rule on earth will be unmistakable and visible. The NT’s introduction of a kingdom currently ruled by Jesus presents another unique expression of the divine kingdom: a mode in which God has chosen to act and through which his control will be expressed.

Parables of the Kingdom

The Parable

 

Expected Form

 

Unexpected Characteristic

 

1.   sower
13:3–9, 18–23

 

Messiah turns Israel and all nations to himself.

 

Individuals respond differently to the gospel invitation.

 

2.   wheat/tares
13:24–30,
36–43

 

The kingdom’s righteous citizens rule over the world with the King.

 

The kingdom’s citizens are among the men of the world, growing together till God’s harvest-time.

 

3.   mustard seed
13:31–32

 

The kingdom begins in majestic glory.

 

The kingdom begins in insignificance; its greatness comes as a surprise.

 

4.   leaven
13:33

 

Only righteousness enters the kingdom; other “raw material” is excluded.

 

The kingdom is implanted in a different “raw material” and grows to fill the whole personality with righteousness.

 

5.   hidden treasure
13:44

 

The kingdom is public and for all.

 

The hidden kingdom is for individual “purchase”.

 

6.   dragnet
13:47–50

 

The kingdom begins with initial separation of righteous and unrighteous.

 

The kingdom ends with final separation of the unrighteous from the righteous.

 

The theological basis for Jesus’ action in the present form of his kingdom is laid in the new birth. “No one can see the kingdom of God unless he is born again” and “no one can enter the kingdom of God unless he is born of water and the Spirit” (Jn 3:3, 5). The new birth gives entrance into the kingdom—the realm in which Jesus’ sovereign power is translated into action on behalf of his people.

But why this stress on being born again? Perhaps because of the fact that when a person is born again, Jesus enters his or her life. And there he takes up permanent residence. è Born Now and for all time Jesus is present in his people—in each believer and in the corporate body of Christ. In a mystical but real way, Jesus is present on earth in us. He is the key to release of the power needed to transform us and to shape the events that affect our lives according to his will.

The kingdom is here because Jesus is here. Because Jesus is here, the possibility of a new kind of life is laid open before us.

5. The coming kingdom. The NT never rejects the OT’s portrait of the future. There will be a kingdom on earth, and Jesus will rule over it in person. Although this is not a dominant theme in NT teaching, Jesus himself confirms the OT vision of history’s end (Mt 8:11, 12; 16:28; 25:1, 34; 26:29; Mk 11:10; 14:25; 15:43; Lk 13:28–29; 14:15; 21:31; Ac 1:6–7; cf. Mt 20:21; Mk 11:10; 15:43; Lk 14:15; 17:20; 19:11; 23:43, 51).

6. Summary. When we read the word “kingdom” in the Bible, we must not import modern notions of a geographical area. The word simply indicates a realm in which a king exercises his power to act and control. The OT knows two different forms of God’s sovereign rule, or kingdom. (1) There is a universal kingdom. God controls all events in the universe but does so nearly always through providence, so that his rule is hidden. (2) There is to be a visible earthly kingdom. In the future, Jesus will return to earth to rule in person over the whole world.

The NT adds another, previously unknown, form of the divine kingdom. This form, like that of the prophetic kingdom, is intimately linked with Jesus, for he is its king. When Jesus was on earth, this kingdom existed here. Although Jesus did not take up earthly political power (Jn 18:36), the miracles he performed showed his authority over every competing power. But Jesus the king was rejected and crucified, as his enemies struggled to force his kingdom out of history.

But Jesus’ death was not the end. During his days on earth, Jesus explained what life under his rule (i.e., in his kingdom) would be like. It is best to take most Gospel descriptions of the kingdom of heaven and the kingdom of God (which should be treated as synonyms) as explanations of life in Jesus’ present kingdom. Here we are given powerful insights into how we can live today as Jesus’ subjects and experience his power. Because the new birth brings us into union with Jesus and brings Jesus in a unique way into our experience here on earth, we live in a day in which the king is present, though still disguised. Because Jesus is present, the unmatched power of God can find supernatural... [1]

 



[1] Lawrence O. Richards, New International Encyclopedia of Bible Words : Based on the NIV and the NASB, Zondervan's understand the Bible reference series (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing House, 1999), 377-82.

Jim:

Is there a way to do Power Lookup without first highlighting the word in a Biblical text? It doesn't have a text entry box at the top of the pane.

Not that I know of. It would be nice if we could do it from the command line, but I couldn't figure out a way to make that work.

Jim:

Also I notice that Bible Word Study Guide doesn't have the same info as Power Lookup. Any thoughts on why?

The lists look the same to me. Did you click "more>>" to expand the list in BWS?

Here's my BWS Definition section (after expanding "more>>"):

Here's my Power Lookup of "kingdom" (2-1/2 pages worth):

The resources are the same, listed in the same order. They just present the info slightly differently. Power Lookup gives you a preview of the first 25 words or so of each article.

Posts 5637
Todd Phillips | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 17 2010 5:55 PM

Rosie Perera:
Power Lookup gives you a preview of the first 25 words or so of each article.

You can get considerably more if you make the Power Lookup window wider.

P.S., Rosie, I think that may have been the longest post I've ever seen.

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Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 17 2010 6:05 PM

Todd Phillips:
P.S., Rosie, I think that may have been the longest post I've ever seen.

Well, the challenge of increasing my post count has gotten boring (I've finally surpassed Dave Hooton, at least for now), so I have to start working on increasing my total post volume. Smile

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steve clark | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 17 2010 6:11 PM

Rosie Perera:
Todd Phillips:
P.S., Rosie, I think that may have been the longest post I've ever seen.
so I have to start working on increasing my total post volume.

but will you push the envelope to find out where the Forum editor will implode? Smile

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Jim | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jul 20 2010 12:48 PM

I have an idea!

Is there any chance that the topic browser in Logos 3 could be tweaked so that it has an option to open stuff in Logos 4?

I went back to the L3 Topic browser and found it streamlined my search a bit. Fancy that!Wink

Have a great day,
jmac

Posts 681
Jim | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jul 20 2010 1:32 PM

Is there any chance that the topic browser in Logos 3 could be tweaked so that it has an option to open stuff in Logos 4?

To add to my last note. I've been sitting here using the Libronix (L3) Topic browser to check out resources, then switching over to L4, opening the resource and moving to the appropriate page or topic then dragging the tab to my Kingdom favorites folder for later study. This has been far more productive than using Logos 4 to find stuff.

For one thing the L3 Topic browser gives me a lot of info in a small window instead of a long list of book icons that expand into a very long "google" style word find of the resource. Second, and related, it finds topics instead of words. And third it opens anything I select in the same large window that overlays my other windows so I immediately move my eye and attention to what I was looking for instead of going on a treasure hunt to find where on the screen it decided to put the resource.

All in all, this is working quite well though not as efficiently as one would hope.

Have a great day,
jmac

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Jim | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jul 20 2010 1:49 PM

Rosie Perera:
Evidently you don't have that resource. It didn't come with any base package. I had to buy it separately. The fact that there aren't more entries there probably means not many articles have been tagged with "kingdom" in LCV (Logos Controlled Vocabulary).

Thanks for the info. You are right I don't have the resource you excerpted. Thanks again, I copied it and stuck it in my note file for further digestion.

However you point out a hole in Logos 4 that I think is significant. There are many good resources that address the topic of the kingdom of God/heaven. The power lookup came up with dictionary entries, but didn't give a very thorough access to all those topics. [added: The power lookup requires you search a Bible for the term you want, highlight it,  then right click to access the power lookup] I opened up a Bible Word Study and typed in kingdom of God which is forces to be truncated to one word, kingdom.

I'm sure I'm not using L4 to its potential, yet, but so far it's been more productive to go back to L3 for this as I mentioned in other posts. I'm still open to learning though.

Have a great day,
jmac

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Jim | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 21 2010 1:08 PM

I happened to notice something in Libronix that I had not tried, but thought I'd give it a go in L4. Doing the search  topic(kingdom).

This gives less hits than just searching for the word kingdom. I tried it on mytag:theology and came up with a number of useful hits. It doesn't seem that the results are as many as the L3 topic browser came up with even with in the same resources. Just thought I'd mention it to see if anyone know how best to use that search form.

Have a great day,
jmac

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spitzerpl | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 21 2010 1:14 PM

Jim:

I happened to notice something in Libronix that I had not tried, but thought I'd give it a go in L4. Doing the search  topic(kingdom).

This gives less hits than just searching for the word kingdom. I tried it on mytag:theology and came up with a number of useful hits. It doesn't seem that the results are as many as the L3 topic browser came up with even with in the same resources. Just thought I'd mention it to see if anyone know how best to use that search form.

topics are being done differently in L4 then they were in L3. Until Logos settles things I think it might be a bit incomplete.

 

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Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 22 2010 6:04 AM

Jim:

I happened to notice something in Libronix that I had not tried, but thought I'd give it a go in L4. Doing the search  topic(kingdom).

This gives less hits than just searching for the word kingdom. I tried it on mytag:theology and came up with a number of useful hits.

Jim, your search for topic(kingdom) is misleading as it is interpreted as topic AND kingdom and it will give fewer results than kingdom. There is no parallel to L3 topic search in L4. My advice is to tailor a Bible Word Study with a Definition section:-

 

and use a collection of Bible Dictionaries for the lookup.

I get at least 6 real Topics for kingdom.

Much has been written about Topics so I would advise a Forum search or a Google search as follows:-

topics site:community.logos.com

Dave
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Friedrich | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 22 2010 7:19 AM

here are some snippets from John Goldingay's OT trilogy, the third which is still on pre-pub:

Yhwh as King
Yhwh’s self-assertion at the Red Sea makes possible the confession “Yhwh will reign forever and ever” (Ex 15:18). We already know that Yhwh is “the ever God,” the lasting God, God forever (yhwh ʾēl ʿôlām; Gen 21:33) and that Yhwh is this God’s name forever (Ex 3:15). The “forever” is not the novel element in this confession, though the second “ever” (ʿed) gives that expression extra emphasis. The novel statement is the declaration that reigning is what Yhwh will do forever.
In Genesis the dominant image for God was guide and provider. There were few occasions when God became involved with kings or peoples like a king, and few if any occasions when God acted as king or warrior, as there were few occasions when Abraham did that (see only Gen 14). So this is the First Testament’s first reference to Yhwh’s reigning (mālak) or being king (melek). Reigning as king is not an elemental biblical concept but a contextual one. Yhwh has been a figure with authority and power from the beginning of the story, making things happen and issuing behavioral directions to human beings, but not being described as king. That further puts the very notion of kingship in its place, rather than supporting it by providing it with a heavenly analogy. In Exodus, God becomes involved in politics in order to deal with the circumstances that have come to overwhelm the Israelites. A king confronts Israel, so Yhwh becomes a king in order to confront this king and play him at his own game, as king delivering Israel from Egypt with powerful decisive acts (šĕpāṭîm gĕdōlîm, Ex 6:6; 7:4). The declaration that Yhwh reigns follows on fourteen references to the “king of Egypt” in Exodus 1–14. Yhwh has dethroned that king. He no longer reigns over Israel as he did. Instead of being ruled by the king of Egypt, henceforth Israel will have the benefits of being ruled by Yhwh, the world ruler. Its destiny lies with this king. Talk of Yhwh’s kingship can refer to a reign over the world, or a reign over Israel, or a reign from Israel over the world. The last makes best sense here.
Exodus 15 suggests further insights on this idea of God’s reign or rule or kingdom. First, from the beginning, God’s reigning is a dynamic concept rather than a spatial one. Yhwh’s malkût is not a place or an area, as the English phrase “kingdom of God” can imply. It is an activity. Second, God’s kingship is punctiliar rather than continuous. Of course God does reign all the time; a person who is king is king all the time. In due course the First Testament will assert the idea of God’s kingship over Israel and that will look more like an ongoing position of authority. Something like kingship is implicit in the notion of a covenant such as the one sealed at Sinai, and even more that reaffirmed in Moab, for this covenant is a quasi-political relationship. But when the First Testament initially talks of God’s reigning, it does so to affirm that God asserts kinglike power in a particular context—namely, when another king asserts his power to oppress God’s people. The kingship image will never be a common one in the First Testament, and when it does occur, it is often set over against human kingship (see esp. 1 Sam 12). “Reigning” is not what God continuously does in the world. Yhwh will continue to play laissez faire through much of history in the manner of the story through Genesis, but Yhwh’s continuing (lĕʿôlām) involvement in the world will mean that Yhwh will always be able and willing to exercise authority in the world like a king when deciding to do so.
Third, from the beginning “God’s reign” is a power concept rather than an authority concept. God has a right to exercise authority in the world, but when God reigns this involves an exercise of power rather than an exercise of authority. Yhwh does not say to the king of Egypt “You must yield to me because I have legitimate authority over you”—though this would have been a quite feasible claim. Yhwh says, “You must yield to me because I am a greater power than you are.” This is implicit in describing Yhwh’s acts as šĕpāṭîm, not so much acts of judgment but decisive acts. After Yhwh’s victory at the Red Sea, all that is needed is the rhetorical question “Who is like you, majestic in holiness, awesome in great renown,


John Goldingay, Old Testament Theology, Volume 1: Israel's Gospel (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2003), 331-32.

A Possession Distinct from All the Peoples
There is another sense in which the fulfillment of God’s promise does not mean that promise ceases to feature in the covenant. The (partial) fulfillment of one undertaking takes Yhwh to the making of a new one. If Israel will make its commitment to respond to Yhwh’s voice, it will gain a distinctive status and significance as “a possession distinct from all the peoples,” a “special possession” or “personal possession” (sĕgullâ). While the whole world belongs to Yhwh, in Yhwh’s mind special status will attach to Israel. It will be a kingdom of priests and a holy nation. “Kingdom” and “nation” stand in parallelism, as do “priests” and “holy.”
Describing Israel as a nation reminds us of a way Yhwh’s promise has indeed been fulfilled (e.g., Gen 12:2). Israel is an entity that will henceforth function politically on the world stage. “Kingdom” follows on the declaration in Exodus 15:18 that Yhwh will reign permanently as king over Israel and over the world; Pharaoh is not allowed to exercise sovereignty over Israel. Yhwh is king for Israel and king over Israel. Israel is now being challenged to commit itself to Yhwh as king, to accept a king’s rule over its life. The people of God is the place where the kingdom is realized, in its internal life and in its destiny in the world.
Israel is a kingdom of priests. It has been brought out of Egypt to serve Yhwh, and it will do so by its worship (e.g., Ex 3:12; 10:8, 11, 24, 26). In origin, priesthood belonged to humanity as a whole (cf. Gen 4:3–4), then acts such as blessing and sacrifice became a father’s task (see, e.g., Gen 8:20; 9:24–27). Here, in keeping with God’s original purpose, the whole people is a priesthood, and this priesthood is prior to that of a particular group within the people who will first appear in Exodus 19:22 and will become the God-appointed means whereby God transmits blessing and receives humanity’s self-offering (e.g., Lev 1–7; Num 6:22–27). It will also survive the demise of that priesthood. The Bible’s first priest was also among its first kings (Gen 14:18), and priesthood and kingship naturally go together—though they are a dangerously powerful combination, so that within Israel priesthood and kingship will be separated. As Yhwh’s priesthood, Israel is no ordinary nation, but a holy nation—a nation distinctively called to serve Yhwh in this way, as well as in other ways. Describing Israel as a priesthood does not attribute to it a priestly role on behalf of the world or between God and the world. But the fact that Exodus 19:3–8 is a form of reworking of Genesis 12:1–3 reminds us that this designation links with Yhwh’s lordship over the whole world and works toward the world’s inclusion rather than its exclusion. The stretching of the royal priesthood to include other peoples (Rev 1:6) is in keeping with the Abrahamic vision.
Talk in terms of kingdom and nation presupposes that Yhwh is relating to a community, to whose elders Moses reports Yhwh’s words. Yet it is the whole people who reply, and the verbs are plural: “they,” “we.” In a sense 603,550 covenants were made at Sinai (b. Sotah 37b). “The covenant introduces into the story a radical voluntarism.” It is not the case that Israel’s relationship with God is a wholly corporate matter, with individuals drawn in purely by virtue of belonging to the body, as it is not the case that the church is a body constituted purely through individual acts of faith. In Israel individuals affirm their personal commitment to Yhwh, and in the church the existence of the body is prior and posterior to the decisions by individuals to pay the price of membership in it. The relationship between Yhwh and Israel intrinsically involves corporate and individual, another polarity standing in unresolved tension.
Of course anyone other than a first-time reader sees a chilling irony in Israel’s agreement to the terms for its becoming a kingdom of priests and a holy nation and its brisk undertaking to do all that Yhwh has said. Although the community will repeat its undertaking in Exodus 24 after the more detailed exposition of Yhwh’s expectations in Exodus 20–23, only a matter of weeks will pass before it has fundamentally reneged on that commitment. It will be that covenant-breaking that necessitates some covenant-making. It will transpire that the people of God has a breathtaking capacity for self-deception


John Goldingay, Old Testament Theology, Volume 1: Israel's Gospel (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2003), 373-74.

 

. . . . also truncated, a la Rosie's post . . .

 

A non logos work is the trilogy by Graeme Goldsworthy.  The three books are Gospel and Kingdom, Gospel and Wisdom, Gospel in Revelation.  I think I remember him defining Kingdom as "God's rule of God's people in God's place."  But don't quote me on that.  He does a good job of looking at the over all unity and hermeneutic of Scripture, and is helpful in seeing the way concepts are spoken of in different Biblical eras.

 

 

 

 

I like Apples.  Especially Honeycrisp.

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Friedrich | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 22 2010 7:23 AM

Sorry, the goldingay trio:

--the prepub: http://www.logos.com/products/prepub/details/6436

--the available:  http://www.logos.com/products/details/4523

the latter is part of a small collection, which contains a nice little OT Theology by Paul House.  He sprinkles kingdom talk throughout, but not one major section.

 

I like Apples.  Especially Honeycrisp.

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