Custom Bundles?

Page 1 of 3 (46 items) 1 2 3 Next >
This post has 45 Replies | 2 Followers

Posts 236
Steven Veach | Forum Activity | Posted: Mon, Nov 15 2021 8:36 AM

Does Logos allow for custom bundles? Meaning, if I want to purchase the Logos 9 Academic Professional but would rather have the Cambridge Commentary instead of the ICC, can this be done? 

I think pre-defined bundles are a terrible idea. They should have the option for custom bundles so customers can bundle together the resources they really want and savings is based on number of titles purchased. Buy 10 get 10% off, etc.  

They are actually stopping me from making purchases because 1. I'm not going to pay full price since prices are inflated. 2. Every time there is a bundle I'm interested in it is loaded with resources I have no interest in and will never use. 3. the resources I really want are not included in any bundles.  

There's got to be a better way so both Logos and the customer win. The current way no one wins since I don't have access to the resources I want and Logos doesn't make a sale. 

Posts 2590
Ronald Quick | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 15 2021 9:03 AM

Customers are not allowed to switch out one commentary in a bundle they do not want for one they do.  Someone can correct me if I am wrong, but believe that the publishers have a say so in what Logos sells, how they sell it and for what price.  The CS Lewis bundle is a perfect example.  As of right now, Logos can only sell it as a bundle.  I did bite the bullet on this one because there were enough resources that made it worth while for me.  I know it is frustrating and there have been many times when I "walked away" because the bundle was more than I was willing to spend.    

However, Logos does offer numerous sales and promotions throughout the year (Black Friday, March Madness, publisher sales, etc.) where you can get resources heavily discounted.  I would watch for these.

Posts 236
Steven Veach | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 15 2021 9:19 AM

Yeah, I keep resources I really want in my wishlist so I can quickly check them month to month. That's how I was able to get the UBS Handbooks on a steep discount.  

Now that I've got the academic discount again (fingers crossed it goes through with the new institution) the Cambridge commentary is discounted by 40%. Meyer's Critical by 72%. Other than waiting for deeper discounts in the future I think the academic discount will be the best price I'll get on most items.  

I can't imagine a publishing company demanding their product be sold only in an expensive package rather than as an individual item or as an addition to a customized bundle. It doesn't make sense to say, "No I don't want to sell what I have to sell." I could see them setting a bottom limit on what the item can sell for, but locking up their product in a bundle seem counter productive.  

I'm starting to lean toward the idea that I should make thorough use of the resources I've already paid for before I purchase new resources. But, in this scenario Logos loses since I have enough resources at this point to keep me busy until I die. But, I'm not Logos. Every business has to determine for itself what is the priority. When I had my own business I wanted lifestyle over income. When the lifestyle suffered (but income increased) I exchanged self-employment for part-time employment for much less money but a guaranteed better quality of life. Most people would say I'm crazy for turning down truck-fulls of money but I've never regretted it once. I suppose Logos has their own formula that may not even factor in the loss they are experiencing when they bar people from purchasing resources because of their odd bundling practices. 

Posts 5868
Forum MVP
Mike Binks | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 15 2021 9:19 AM

Steven Veach:
Does Logos allow for custom bundles? Meaning, if I want to purchase the Logos 9 Academic Professional but would rather have the Cambridge Commentary instead of the ICC, can this be done?

As I understand it this is not an option.

Steven Veach:
I think pre-defined bundles are a terrible idea. They should have the option for custom bundles so customers can bundle together the resources they really want and savings is based on number of titles purchased. Buy 10 get 10% off, etc.

That is an idea but the savings at 10% wouldn't really match up to the savings one can obtain by purchasing the various packs on offer.

Steven Veach:
I'm not going to pay full price since prices are inflated

I've never really found this to be so.

Steven Veach:
it is loaded with resources I have no interest in and will never use.

You may be right but as ones library increases the chance that an Author will quote from one of those 'not wanted and never to be used' resources increases and never becomes seldom.

My way of dealing is to buy what I need and then look out for sales and promotions for things that I might like or want.

 

tootle pip

Mike

How to get logs and post them. (now tagging post-apocalyptic fiction as current affairs)

Posts 236
Steven Veach | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 15 2021 9:33 AM

Mike Binks:

That is an idea but the savings at 10% wouldn't really match up to the savings one can obtain by purchasing the various packs on offer.

I would tier the discount with a cap. The more titles you purchased the more savings up to a point. Savings, in the end, is really perceived value so it's relative to the one who is saving. One person might save 10% and feel like they got a deal while another person would need to save 50% before they felt the same way.  Plus I would do both - their packaging + custom packaging. The more options the better from the customer perspective. 

The same is true of inflated pricing. Someone who has x amount of disposable income may perceive prices as being reasonable. Someone who has less disposable income could see prices as being inflated. Price inflation is entirely relative. I've sold services for X dollars in the past to a specific kind of client and they thought I was gouging them. Instead of providing a discount though I doubled my sell price and shifted to an entirely different client base who had more money and was more than willing to pay the inflated price (and were less hassle than the first client). Of course, the only person in this scenario who loses is the first client who can no longer afford the inflated price. 

P.S. My MacBook Air is working great by the way. It's a little difficult making the switch from Windows (or android) to the Mac OS environment, but I'm getting the hang of it. The new battery doubled my battery life and I have cables on the way to connect to my 50,000 power brick which will increase it even more. Thanks for the suggestion on the other thread. I would never have thought of jumping ship to Mac otherwise. 

Posts 5868
Forum MVP
Mike Binks | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Nov 16 2021 12:36 AM

Steven Veach:
The same is true of inflated pricing.

I understand, I have always understood the term 'inflated price' and it cohorts to indicate a price which is charged that cannot be justified by the value of the goods or services provided. A term with, if not a hint of dishonesty then with a dash of greed underlying it.

Part of the way I try and live my life is to make sure that when I buy (or sell) then I do my best to balance a good deal for me with a good deal for the second party. It's all to do with not 'gleaning my fields to the edge'. The aim is that both I and my second come away from a transaction content but not rejoicing (in the others misfortune).

With the above definition in mind I have never considered that, over all, Faithlife's prices were inflated. I am very content to be a purchaser from them and find their pricing general competitive given that they are peddling a fairly unique product.

tootle pip

Mike

How to get logs and post them. (now tagging post-apocalyptic fiction as current affairs)

Posts 236
Steven Veach | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Nov 16 2021 1:12 AM

I can understand your logic here, but I think we might be coming from two very different perspectives. I wouldn't claim that Logos is dealing deceptively, as if they were willingly or knowingly trying to sell a defective product or making a claim about a product that wasn't true. Rather, I think their overall strategy (or what I assume their strategy to be) is geared around maximizing profit. Yes, they are a business. But, they also (I assume) claim to be a ministry and a Christian business. 

There is a logic to their pricing strategy and, while it is not deceptive, I would argue it is limiting to a large swath of people who are not in their target economic strata. Motive is important by Christ's standards. If Faithlife is pricing their products across the board because those are the prices that are actually needed to stay in business then there is no issue. But, if they are willfully pricing their products simply because there is a willing subset of buyer out there (aka, they are targeting affluent Christians and are not concerned about poor or moderately positioned individuals) then I think this is a problem for a professing ministry. 

I'm not saying they need to give away all of their products. I'm also not saying they need to sell the Word Biblical Commentary for $25 for the entire set. But if a ministry like TW5 can find a way to give away public domain titles so could Logos. In fact, Logos is positioned financially to do much more good than a much smaller ministry the brings in little to no money. 

When you take a product like Cambridge Commentary for Schools and Colleges and see that this product is in the pubic domain and is distributed for free to the public with TW5, the price is clearly inflated if Logos charges $300 for it.  

Yes, their programmers went through the text and cleaned it up. They did hyperlinks. But, as a ministry they are not being very generous when they operate no differently than a for-profit.  

As I've said in previous posts, this is all relative. Some people with adequate disposable income do not feel the price point as severely as someone who has limited funds. But this is a universal plight for those who are not fortunate. I personally live in between these two worlds. I do not make very much money overall, but I also do not have many expenses, I'm completely out of debt, own my home and car, and live without ridiculously expensive hobbies. But, I've also never made more than $50,000 in any given year in my entire life. Yet I want for nothing, 60% of my income is disposable, and always have food, shelter, and am always comfortably warm and have a great job that really isn't like work at all (no real bosses, work alone, in my own office, on a park like campus, etc). For someone who makes $250,000 a year, their world is utterly foreign from someone who makes $6000 a year. Like the difference between living on earth and mars.  

Logos is catering to those who make well above the poverty line and is making little to no accommodation for those who exist at or under it. Yes, it is a free market economy. I have no intention of ever buying a yacht because I don't live in that world. But yachts are not built and sold by people who claim to be Christians and say they are trying to "use technology to equip the church to grow in the light of the Bible." This may be their aim but they are either purposefully or inadvertantly leaving a bunch of people in the dark because they can't afford the products they offer.  

It's a personal opinion. When I see products priced at $25,000 that just seems gross somehow. But I wouldn't pay half that for a vehicle either. Like I said, it's different worlds.  

I just think Logos could do a better job at making their products accessible to everyone if they wanted to. 

Posts 35553
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Nov 16 2021 2:09 AM

Steven Veach:
When I see products priced at $25,000 that just seems gross somehow.

Perhaps you are missing one point -- products in this price range, I suspect, are rarely purchased without a significant dynamic pricing discount. Individuals don't start out buying the "ultimate" package, but over the years, the resources they already own, chip away at the price of the higher packages so that one slowly brings the prices down to something reasonable for one's budgets.

Steven Veach:
Logos could do a better job at making their products accessible to everyone if they wanted to. 

Given the amount of money they appear to have available for development, I'm not keen on decreasing the funds available to FL. I'd be willing to pay a bit more or have fewer freebies if I saw more development - bug corrections, finishing features, working on parity on other platforms.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 5868
Forum MVP
Mike Binks | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Nov 16 2021 2:33 AM

Steven Veach:
But if a ministry like TW5 can find a way to give away public domain titles so could Logos.

Intrigued by this line I googled 'TW5', 'TW5 Bible' and didn't find an obvious hit.

I was interested to see just what sort of product TW5 was offering and how it compared to my World Bible Commentary in Logos.

To my thinking Logos should not be aiming its offering at the hoi polloi. Faithlife is selling a professional tool, for professional workers and academics. There is a place for the amateur (using amateur in the sense that one does it for love rather than monetary renumeration) who would forego spending a fortune on fishing gear, golf, or another hobby in favour of spending time with the word.

The very fact that these resources are available from other sources belies the assertion that Faithlife is depriving anyone of the content by setting their price such as to maintain the business of providing professional tools. There are examples of those whose business models were such that their users were abandoned with a product that their sellers could no longer sustain.

Today I looked at Amazon for the price of Electric Drills, the cheapest of which was about £20, the highest of which was a 'Shexton' at about £720. I don't think anyone would claim the Shexton is depriving anyone of the chance to drill a hole by charging £720. They may be offering the professional the chance to drill thousands of holes quickly or even drilling a better class of hole. I will not be buying a £720 drill. There are others available, they may be lesser drills, they may drill less pristine hole, they may not work for as long but they will be adequate for the task I have.

Professional tools, from sustainable companies come at a price. Not everyone needs a professional tool, not everyone should even aspire to owning one. 

tootle pip

Mike

How to get logs and post them. (now tagging post-apocalyptic fiction as current affairs)

Posts 444
Bernhard | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Nov 16 2021 5:32 AM

Mike Binks:
Intrigued by this line I googled 'TW5', 'TW5 Bible' and didn't find an obvious hit.

Search for "TheWord". For the fact that it is developed mostly by one person, it is a great product. I'd say like a drill in the 200 Euros price range, with some features usually not found below the 300 Euros price range. But it's free - well, the software is and the public domain books that volunteers spent many hours to make them usable. Once you start buying recent books, I am sure you will hit Logos' price range very quickly - as there are basically no discounted bundles to speak of.

Posts 5868
Forum MVP
Mike Binks | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Nov 16 2021 10:40 AM

Thanks Bernhard

I had a look at the website but decided against downloading the software. I might be very good but I would need to be convinced that it performs as well as Logos.

If the 'resources' are as inexpensive as is suggested I guess, for some, it would be worth running it alongside Logos, perhaps on a third monitor or something.  ;-)

I guess the telling part of your post was...

Bernhard:
it is developed mostly by one person
and
Bernhard:
volunteers spent many hours to make them usable

I wonder how many are on Faithlife's payroll and are reliant on us paying a fair price for their livelihood!

tootle pip

Mike

How to get logs and post them. (now tagging post-apocalyptic fiction as current affairs)

Posts 236
Steven Veach | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Nov 16 2021 12:22 PM

Mike Binks:

I had a look at the website but decided against downloading the software. I might be very good but I would need to be convinced that it performs as well as Logos.

If the 'resources' are as inexpensive as is suggested I guess, for some, it would be worth running it alongside Logos, perhaps on a third monitor or something.  ;-)

I guess the telling part of your post was...

Bernhard:
it is developed mostly by one person
and
Bernhard:
volunteers spent many hours to make them usable

I wonder how many are on Faithlife's payroll and are reliant on us paying a fair price for their livelihood!

The features of TheWord Bible Software (TW5) cannot be compared with Logos. They are not the same. TW5 is severely limited in what it can do compared to Logos. This is the reason I left TW5 after many years and eventually ended up using Logos. 

The fact, though, that there are several public domain titles that are released for free on the TW5 platform but those same titles Logos charges $150-$300 for illustrates my point.  

When I was using Logos on my windows laptop I ran TW5 also in the background because it has a clipboard monitor. But it is really ridiculous to do this when Logos could easily implement the same feature. Likewise, I have no interest in using more than one Bible program to study with. It's frustrating that I have to use an external program to take notes since Logos' note system is not at all function (in my view).  

TW5 is created and maintained by a single individual and charges no money for the software or the support. Now, imagine what a team of individuals (Logos) could do if they operated the same way and had the resources and reach that Logos does.  

I'm not interested in analyzing if Faithlife's employees are dependent on overpriced products so they have a livelihood. If they are not a ministry but only a for-profit business then there is nothing more to discuss. But if they are professing to be a ministry I think sacrifice is important key here. Why does ministry automatically require funding livelihood? Most of the church is required to work a regular job (outside of the church) and then donate/volunteer their time. Like you said, TW5 has a host of volunteers that work countless hours for free.  

It is a purposeful decision on behalf of Logos to lock up their products by a price point. It is a strategy. I just think they could do more than what they're currently doing. 

Posts 236
Steven Veach | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Nov 16 2021 12:34 PM

Mike Binks:

To my thinking Logos should not be aiming its offering at the hoi polloi. Faithlife is selling a professional tool, for professional workers and academics. There is a place for the amateur (using amateur in the sense that one does it for love rather than monetary renumeration) who would forego spending a fortune on fishing gear, golf, or another hobby in favour of spending time with the word.

The very fact that these resources are available from other sources belies the assertion that Faithlife is depriving anyone of the content by setting their price such as to maintain the business of providing professional tools. There are examples of those whose business models were such that their users were abandoned with a product that their sellers could no longer sustain.

Today I looked at Amazon for the price of Electric Drills, the cheapest of which was about £20, the highest of which was a 'Shexton' at about £720. I don't think anyone would claim the Shexton is depriving anyone of the chance to drill a hole by charging £720.

Professional tools, from sustainable companies come at a price. Not everyone needs a professional tool, not everyone should even aspire to owning one. 

So Logos is not meant for general Bible study? Logos markets specifically toward professional (clergy) and academics? I bet if I called Logos and said I was just going to use their software for basic bible study, is it too advanced for me they would give me a long list of reasons why it is the PERFECT program for basic bible study. I've watched countless webinars about Logos from Faithlife employees extolling the benefits and virtues of their products for the layman. This is simply not correct. Logos is obviously marketing to a specific subset of individuals who are affluent and have a certain level of disposable income. And this is fine. The problem is, their price points restrict those who are not at this target. 

I agree with you about the electric drill. No one is saying Shexton is doing anything wrong. If Logos did not claim to be trying to help the church or that they were a ministry or Christian then I would not have a problem with it either. Because they do claim all these things, though, they should be doing more than what they currently do to help those who do not fit their target market. The church is made up of more than those who have the disposable income to drop $1000-$3000 on a bible program.  You cannot compare a secular for-profit business with a company that purports to be a Christian ministry. The ministry is supposed to be held to a higher standard in both thought and deed. 

I would say there are no other programs available on the market that can do what Logos does. There are no free programs that offer Logos features. If TW5 could have done it I would have gladly stayed with them forever. But after discussions with the author of the program it was clear he had no intension of expanding the feature set of his program.  

I like Logos. I think it is a great program (desktop - the mobile needs a lot of work). But, they just seem to be operating from a secular paradigm instead of a biblical one. 

Posts 35553
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Nov 16 2021 12:46 PM

Steven Veach:
The fact, though, that there are several public domain titles that are released for free on the TW5 platform but those same titles Logos charges $150-$300 for illustrates my point.  

Please provide some examples as most public domain volumes in Logos are modestly priced or on the free list for those on a subscription.

Steven Veach:
It is a purposeful decision on behalf of Logos to lock up their products by a price point. It is a strategy. I just think they could do more than what they're currently doing. 

One can argue forever over the Faithlife business model which include Proclaim and Church management software. I, personally, wish they had stuck with their core product Bible study as that is all I am interested in. However, Bob P. has successfully navigated the market that has brought many of his competitors down. He has provided PPB abilities for users to share public domain items produced by (volunteer) users. I know that many users would like Faithlife to be a ministry rather than a business. I am glad it is a business because businesses can be more inclusive than ministries and I would like to see Faithlife broaden even further - supporting the Oriental Churches diaspora. But despite many disappointments over the years, I have learn to trust Bob's business savvy and simply keep pushing for the features I feel are needed to improve the software and broaden the base..

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 236
Steven Veach | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Nov 16 2021 12:47 PM

MJ. Smith:

Steven Veach:
When I see products priced at $25,000 that just seems gross somehow.

Perhaps you are missing one point -- products in this price range, I suspect, are rarely purchased without a significant dynamic pricing discount. Individuals don't start out buying the "ultimate" package, but over the years, the resources they already own, chip away at the price of the higher packages so that one slowly brings the prices down to something reasonable for one's budgets.

Steven Veach:
Logos could do a better job at making their products accessible to everyone if they wanted to. 

Given the amount of money they appear to have available for development, I'm not keen on decreasing the funds available to FL. I'd be willing to pay a bit more or have fewer freebies if I saw more development - bug corrections, finishing features, working on parity on other platforms.

I have not missed the point. This is a pricing strategy. Multiple packages. Insane top-tier prices at one end with a few free (often useless) products at the other end psychologically make the middle packages seem more palatable. Any marketing class will teach this. If you know what to look for it is impossible to miss. I did the same thing in my business and it work incredibly well. There were about 20% of my market that would pay the top tier price because they were affluent and wanted the perceived best (whether it was or not) no matter what. There were about 20% who always bought the lowest price because they were frugal or cash strapped (relative). But these two extremes made it feel better for the customers in the middle package overall. By using this strategy (I took over an existing business) I not only increased revenue overall, but I fired about 40% of the existing client base because they would not pay the higher prices.  

BUT, there is a big difference between a secular business run to maximize profits and a ministry that claims to be trying to edify the church. I'm trying to point out there are other ministries similar to Logos (TW5 for example) that do a great job of this without the bizarre overhead Logos seems to demand.  

As to the money available to development, this is a professional choice from the leadership of Logos. They choose what is allocated and where to focus their resources. They are choosing not to focus on development at this time. Plus they could solve this issue quite easily by doing a crowd-funding campaign based on features people want the most. You're willing to pay for development. I'm willing to pay for development. But I'm not willing to put money into a black hole where there is no direction and no guarantee on development. This is an intentional disconnect so Logos can do what it wants with their revenue. If they did a crowd-fund for a specfic feature or feature set, then we would know what they were doing, how much it would cost, and would have estimated times for its completion. Development would pass from Logos to the end user. 

Posts 35553
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Nov 16 2021 12:49 PM

Steven Veach:
I ran TW5 also in the background because it has a clipboard monitor.

Have you made this suggestion in the Suggestions forum, added it to Feedbear, and tried to drum up support. I don't recall seeing this particular suggestion made before and am very curious as to how much support it would get. I can see its usefulness for certain workflows.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 1161
DMB | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Nov 16 2021 12:51 PM

Mike Binks:

To my thinking Logos should not be aiming its offering at the hoi polloi. Faithlife is selling a professional tool, for professional workers and academics. There is a place for the amateur (using amateur in the sense that one does it for love rather than monetary renumeration) who would forego spending a fortune on fishing gear, golf, or another hobby in favour of spending time with the word.

Mike, you absolutely get the 10 year best-quote award.  You almost got the 15 year award, but George held on, by a smidgin.

And my feeling exactly ... only people as smart as me should be allowed to buy Logos. I know, I know .... that's setting the Piper-professionals' bar way too low ... so low, it might cause stumbling.

Posts 236
Steven Veach | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Nov 16 2021 12:56 PM

MJ. Smith:

Steven Veach:
I ran TW5 also in the background because it has a clipboard monitor.

Have you made this suggestion in the Suggestions forum, added it to Feedbear, and tried to drum up support. I don't recall seeing this particular suggestion made before and am very curious as to how much support it would get. I can see its usefulness for certain workflows.

I have not. I found a more immediate workaround by leaving a blank passage list open in a tab so whenever I come across a string of references I want to look at (say in a pdf or ebook) I just copy it and past it into the passage list. These are all individually populated and I can copy these individually or all of them easily. 

I typically do not do suggestion improvements for Logos since the process seems to take years. TW5 was not this way. If a suggestion was made concerning a module, someone in the forum would jump on it. If it was a feature issue the author would respond right away and the improvement would typically be in the next update (or an explanation would be provided as to why it couldn't/wouldn't be).  

This is primarily why I left the android platform and am now trying out a Mac. I cannot wait the 5 year+ timeframe it's going to take to get the android app developed. The timeframes for logos development just seem way too long.  

This has been the greatest shock for me that commercial programs that customers pays thousands of dollars for does not have better customer service and more active development. I found this true in both Logos and Accordance. 

Posts 35553
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Nov 16 2021 1:32 PM

Steven Veach:
I typically do not do suggestion improvements for Logos since the process seems to take years.

Allow me to be inappropriately obnoxious. Having been the development manager for payroll/personnel on a payroll that was over a billion dollars 25 years ago, I have the attitude that a user who is unwilling to make suggestions gives up their right to criticize. Some suggestions get done quite quickly; others take many years -- often because under the hood they are cataclysmic changes (highlighting or attaching notes to footnotes is an example). Yes, I wish Faithlife had more resources to assign to bug fixes, feature completion, and new features ... but to get the necessary funds, they would have to raise their prices considerably. As manager of a staff of 10-12 programmers, I also had requests that had been deemed useful that sat undone for a decade down to requests completed within two weeks. I sympathize with the Faithlife developers. Prioritization is poorly understood by those unfamiliar with the complexity of interactions of millions of lines of code.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 236
Steven Veach | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Nov 16 2021 1:37 PM

MJ. Smith:

Steven Veach:
The fact, though, that there are several public domain titles that are released for free on the TW5 platform but those same titles Logos charges $150-$300 for illustrates my point.  

Please provide some examples as most public domain volumes in Logos are modestly priced or on the free list for those on a subscription.

Absolutely. Here area a few: 

Cambridge Greek Testament 100.00
Cambridge Commentary 288.00
Meyer’s Exegetical Commentary 100.00
Pulpit Commentary 60.00
Lange’s Commentary 261.00
Church Fathers 60.00

These are all available in TW5 absolutely free. It would take nothing for Logos to provide these in the base package for every individual. But they don't because they know if people have enough materials there's less chance they will upgrade. 

As for modern products the NICOT/NT illustrates inflated pricing: 

Logos - $1599.00 (regular price before any sales)
TW5 - $1,095.68 (regular price before any sales)

MJ. Smith:

Steven Veach:
It is a purposeful decision on behalf of Logos to lock up their products by a price point. It is a strategy. I just think they could do more than what they're currently doing. 

I know that many users would like Faithlife to be a ministry rather than a business. 

So, I guess I've just been assuming here. Does Faithlife not consider or market itself as a Christian ministry? Their catch phrase certainly would beg to differ. The about link on their website simply states they are a "tech company."  

This article doesn't paint the founder in a very good light: 
https://moneyinc.com/10-things-you-didnt-know-about-faithlife-ceo-bob-pritchett/ 

I think this forum thread basically establishes that Logos/Faithlife is a for-profit company and not a ministry: 
https://community.logos.com/forums/t/115408.aspx

Page 1 of 3 (46 items) 1 2 3 Next > | RSS