I spy Logos 6 Legacy Libraries

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Posts 1917
Ken McGuire | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 26 2021 1:26 PM

Kathleen Marie:
The free Verbum includes some things that are not included in free Logos. Is the CCC in the free Verbum?

Not that I see. It has the Catechism that came out of Trent, but not the current one. I first officially picked it up in https://www.logos.com/product/18543/catechism-of-the-catholic-church-collection which was the first Roman Catholic specific collection I picked up. But I have since gotten another edition of it later Verbum packages.

As for the SDA Bronze, the Discourse ESV may have me look a bit deeper. But I am pretty far away from SDA theologically....

The Gospel is not ... a "new law," on the contrary, ... a "new life." - William Julius Mann

L8 Anglican, Lutheran and Orthodox Silver, Reformed Starter, Academic Essentials

L7 Lutheran Gold, Anglican Bronze

Posts 217
1Cor10:31 | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 26 2021 3:43 PM

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae Commentary (https://www.logos.com/product/3870/charles-simeons-horae-homileticae-commentary) is there in Logos 6 Standard Silver. It has high praise from Spurgeon and John Piper. Otherwise, you can only find it only in really expensive packages (Logos 7 Anglican Diamond and Logos 9 Portfolio).

Posts 217
1Cor10:31 | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 26 2021 4:05 PM

Most volumes of the "Focus on the Bible" commentary (https://www.logos.com/product/205210/focus-on-the-bible-commentary-series-fob) are included in Reformed Silver. Many of the remaining are on sale for $2.99.

At any rate, the complete set doesn't seem to be in any base package. The same set that is available in Logos 6 Reformed Silver is otherwise only available in really expensive packages (Logos 9 Baptist Diamond is the cheapest as far as I can see)

Posts 1376
Sean | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 26 2021 6:16 PM

Sean:
(For the health of my wallet, I'll refrain from revisiting the L6 packages I haven't already gotten...)

Okay, so I didn't. Got 206 resources for about $90, not bad at all, especially as I was able to pick up a couple big theological/biblical dictionaries as part of a package that costs less than one of the dictionaries alone.

Posts 708
Kathleen Marie | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 26 2021 6:51 PM

Ken McGuire:

Kathleen Marie:
The free Verbum includes some things that are not included in free Logos. Is the CCC in the free Verbum?

Not that I see. It has the Catechism that came out of Trent, but not the current one. I first officially picked it up in https://www.logos.com/product/18543/catechism-of-the-catholic-church-collection which was the first Roman Catholic specific collection I picked up. But I have since gotten another edition of it later Verbum packages.

As for the SDA Bronze, the Discourse ESV may have me look a bit deeper. But I am pretty far away from SDA theologically....

I don't know how I have the CCC.

SDA is not a denomination that I have spent much time studying. I was surprised that there were so many non-denominational resources that I want in the package. It is in my wishlist. I am thinking about it, but think I need to wait or skip it.

Posts 1516
Kiyah | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 26 2021 8:25 PM

Sean:

Sean:
(For the health of my wallet, I'll refrain from revisiting the L6 packages I haven't already gotten...)

Okay, so I didn't. Got 206 resources for about $90, not bad at all, especially as I was able to pick up a couple big theological/biblical dictionaries as part of a package that costs less than one of the dictionaries alone.

Same. I got 205 resources for $96. Cleared some things off my wishlist that had been there forever.

Posts 1516
Kiyah | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 26 2021 9:58 PM

Ken McGuire:
As for the SDA Bronze, the Discourse ESV may have me look a bit deeper. But I am pretty far away from SDA theologically....

You may already know this, but the Discourse Analysis Visual Filter turns any reverse interlinear bible into a discourse bible. So you don't have to spend your money on an SDA package unless you just want the Discourse ESV as a standalone resource.

https://support.logos.com/hc/en-us/articles/360025765231-How-do-I-search-for-Discourse-Types-

If you have all of the features you already have the ability to do what the Discourse ESV does.

Posts 1730
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Veli Voipio | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 26 2021 10:50 PM

Kiyah:

Sean:

Sean:
(For the health of my wallet, I'll refrain from revisiting the L6 packages I haven't already gotten...)

Okay, so I didn't. Got 206 resources for about $90, not bad at all, especially as I was able to pick up a couple big theological/biblical dictionaries as part of a package that costs less than one of the dictionaries alone.

Same. I got 205 resources for $96. Cleared some things off my wishlist that had been there forever.

Well, I've got 135 resources for about $62, Lutheran Bronze and Orthodox Silver. 

Gold package, and original language material and ancient text material, SIL and UBS books, discourse Hebrew OT and Greek NT. PC with Windows 11

Posts 1917
Ken McGuire | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Nov 27 2021 6:30 AM

1Cor10:31:
Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae Commentary (https://www.logos.com/product/3870/charles-simeons-horae-homileticae-commentary) is there in Logos 6 Standard Silver. It has high praise from Spurgeon and John Piper. Otherwise, you can only find it only in really expensive packages (Logos 7 Anglican Diamond and Logos 9 Portfolio).

Personally, I would think that the New American Commentary series would be the big appeal for Standard Silver.

The Gospel is not ... a "new law," on the contrary, ... a "new life." - William Julius Mann

L8 Anglican, Lutheran and Orthodox Silver, Reformed Starter, Academic Essentials

L7 Lutheran Gold, Anglican Bronze

Posts 708
Kathleen Marie | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Nov 27 2021 9:33 AM

Ken McGuire:

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae Commentary (https://www.logos.com/product/3870/charles-simeons-horae-homileticae-commentary) is there in Logos 6 Standard Silver. It has high praise from Spurgeon and John Piper. Otherwise, you can only find it only in really expensive packages (Logos 7 Anglican Diamond and Logos 9 Portfolio).

Personally, I would think that the New American Commentary series would be the big appeal for Standard Silver.

They appear to be very different sets to my untrained eyes, and equally useful in different ways. The Lange set claims to include commentary on the apocrypha. This package in my wishlist.

Even if I cannot afford these sets in Logos, I am learning what to seek in another way. I have been requesting books through interlibrary loan when I cannot afford them in logos and it seems to have changed the way a grumpy librarian treats me. LOL God is always always in control.

Posts 3475
David Taylor Jr | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Nov 30 2021 9:35 PM

Picked up L6 Gold

Posts 5909
SineNomine | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Dec 1 2021 11:24 AM

Ken McGuire:
Personally, I would think that the New American Commentary series would be the big appeal for Standard Silver.

What appeal/benefit/use does NAC have for folks who are not Evangelical Protestants?

Please use descriptive thread titles to attract helpful posts & not waste others' time. Thanks!

Posts 708
Kathleen Marie | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Dec 1 2021 3:39 PM

SineNomine:

Ken McGuire:
Personally, I would think that the New American Commentary series would be the big appeal for Standard Silver.

What appeal/benefit/use does NAC have for folks who are not Evangelical Protestants?

It counts as an "acceptable" resource to quote in an academic paper, regardless of the denomination of the professor and school.

I invested in Logos primarily to increase my library of "acceptable" resources. Some of my favorite ebooks that I bought for ME are "folk theology" and "outdated" in other software, and cannot be used in my academic papers except in very specific circumstances. We all are given tasks to do by the Father, and some of us are limited to what He makes accessible to us. Logos packages have been the cheapest way to acquire quotable stuff, especially when I am not picky about denomination. Sometimes the best quotes come from the resources that are most different from the denomination that we favor. I have been surprised at what I have stumbled on in books that I would not have looked at unless it was all that I had.

I am still looking at that Silver set with the partial set NAC, but I am waiting until the entire Christmas season is over. If I get a chance to purchase the things at the top of my wishlist, I need to be prepared to grab them.

I've spent some time in prayer and need to pray more. I thought certain things were going to be on sale that were not. They are missing things that have created a bit of a bottle neck in what I can do with what I already have. I am pulling back and doing almost nothing until I am given more guidance.

Evangelical, SDA, Catholic, Messianic: It is all good stuff to me if it is "acceptable" to professors.

Posts 5039
Mattillo | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 2 2021 6:21 AM

SineNomine:

Ken McGuire:
Personally, I would think that the New American Commentary series would be the big appeal for Standard Silver.

What appeal/benefit/use does NAC have for folks who are not Evangelical Protestants?

I would say to read broadly across theological lines. The NAC is also very well known and been around a while with volumes in the Top 5 on Best Commentaries if that is worth anything to you. Lastly, I have several courses that do use the NAC as readings.

Best Comms Says:

The New American Commentary (NAC) series brings the best of contemporary evangelical scholarship that honors the full trustworthiness and authority of Scripture to the task of serious exegetical and theological exposition of the Word. Since a commentary is a fundamental tool for the expositor or teacher who seeks to interpret and apply Scripture in the church or classroom, the NAC focuses on communicating the theological structure and content of each biblical book. The writers seek to illuminate both the historical meaning and contemporary significance of Holy Scripture.

In its attempt to make a unique contribution to the Christian community, the NAC focuses on two concerns. First, the commentary emphasizes how each section of a book fits together so that the reader becomes aware of the theological unity of each book and of Scripture as a whole. The writers, however, remain aware of the Bible’s inherently rich variety. Second, the NAC is produced with the conviction that the Bible primarily belongs to the church. Scholarship and the academy provide an indispensable foundation for biblical understanding and the service of Christ, but the editors and authors of this series have attempted to communicate the findings of their research in a manner that will build up the whole body of Christ. Thus, the commentary concentrates on theological exegesis, while providing practical, applicable exposition.

The NAC is for those who have been seeking a commentary that honors the Scriptures, represents the finest in contemporary evangelical scholarship, and lends itself to the practical work of preaching and teaching. This series serves as a minister’s friend and a student’s guide.

The NAC assumes the inerrancy of Scripture, focuses on the intrinsic theological and exegetical concerns of each biblical book, and engages the range of issues raised in contemporary biblical scholarship. Drawing on the skills and insights of over 40 scholars, the NAC brings together scholarship and piety to produce a tool that enhances and supports the life of the church.

https://bestcommentaries.com/series/new-american-commentary-nac/ 

Posts 5909
SineNomine | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 2 2021 7:12 PM

Mattillo:
I would say to read broadly across theological lines.

I have literally hundreds (and hundreds) of Protestant Bible commentaries of various types in Verbum/Logos, including other evangelical ones. How does NAC compare with other evangelical Protestant commentaries? More/less detailed? More/less pastoral? More/less aware of recent historical-critical and related scholarship? More/less conversant with contemporary non-Protestant Bible scholarship? More/less aware of the exegetical traditions of pre-Protestant Christians? More/less committed to hidden/implicit-only theological presuppositions? More/less inclined to provide multiple possibilities when interpretations are disputed? More/less likely to note (and accurately articulate) significant exegetical positions that their authors personally oppose?

I read Best Commentaries blurbs on well-regarded-by-it commentaries as being akin to marketing copy, however unfair that may be on my part, so I'm happy to read any personal corroborations (or refutations) of its remarks on the NAC.

Please use descriptive thread titles to attract helpful posts & not waste others' time. Thanks!

Posts 708
Kathleen Marie | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 2 2021 9:48 PM

SineNomine:

I have literally hundreds (and hundreds) of Protestant Bible commentaries of various types in Verbum/Logos, including other evangelical ones. ...

...  I'm happy to read any personal corroborations (or refutations) of its remarks on the NAC.

Why is this set more likely to listed as required reading on a syllabus than the hundreds of others? I merely noticed the frequency of times I have seen the NAC listed as "acceptable", "recommended" and "required", and figured that I should jump at any chance to acquire the volumes that I see listed the most often, if and when they were offered at steep enough discount.

I am doing a lot of reevaluating this week. And asking questions that I have not asked myself and others.

WHY is this set better than the others? Is it better, or just more popular for some other reason?

Posts 1048
Lew Worthington | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 2 2021 10:54 PM

I'm going to jump in here with a professional, albeit (barely) retired perspective. And by the way, Kathleen Marie, I don't know where you are in school, if at all. I'm speaking from a seminary level. Anyway, I'm not sure why others have assigned the NAC as required reading, but in my teaching, I never did, I probably never would. (For that matter, in my own pastoral work, I barely looked at them  -- maybe never. I usually don't need many ideas for application, so it wouldn't help me much in that department when I'm trying to listen to the voice of God in preparing a sermon. Smile ) But having said that, I don't have anything against them, per se, other than their stated lack of technical detail, something I needed for graduate students. Also, for technical work, I usually avoided material from denominational publishing houses.

Furthermore (this is mostly for SineNomine), Best Commentaries doesn't do a real good job of reflecting quality for original approaches, and tends favor the approaches I avoided that I spoke of in the preceding paragraph. And that's OK. But when I first learned about that cool web site, it took me a few minutes to realize that I needed to keep its focus in mind.

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 2 2021 11:16 PM

Kathleen Marie:
Why is this set more likely to listed as required reading on a syllabus than the hundreds of others? I merely noticed the frequency of times I have seen the NAC listed as "acceptable", "recommended" and "required", and figured that I should jump at any chance to acquire the volumes that I see listed the most often, if and when they were offered at steep enough discount.

I could counter with "Observe the number of seminaries/Bible colleges by denomination. Which denominations have the most seminaries/Bible colleges? They will produce the most reading lists and those lists will reflect their biases." My approach is quite different and reflects my "denominational" bias. I look at the 16 or so approaches to Bible study covered in Pontifical Biblical Commission. The Interpretation of the Bible in the Church. Vatican City: Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 1993. and try to get commentaries (or monographs) to represent each approach.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 5909
SineNomine | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Dec 3 2021 9:28 AM

Lew Worthington:
other than their stated lack of technical detail

Lew Worthington:
I'm speaking from a seminary level. Anyway, I'm not sure why others have assigned the NAC as required reading, but in my teaching, I never did, I probably never would. (For that matter, in my own pastoral work, I barely looked at them  -- maybe never. I usually don't need many ideas for application

Lew Worthington:
Furthermore (this is mostly for SineNomine), Best Commentaries doesn't do a real good job of reflecting quality for original approaches, and tends favor the approaches I avoided that I spoke of in the preceding paragraph. And that's OK. But when I first learned about that cool web site, it took me a few minutes to realize that I needed to keep its focus in mind.

Thank you.

Please use descriptive thread titles to attract helpful posts & not waste others' time. Thanks!

Posts 708
Kathleen Marie | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Dec 3 2021 9:41 AM

Yes! Thank you!

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