Lectio Divina approach to preaching

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Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Apr 23 2022 9:11 PM

I've added a request for Ladder of Monks as a standalone work (actually it comes in a volume with Guigo II's Twelve Meditations, but at least "Ladder of Monks" is in the title). You can vote for it here:

https://feedback.faithlife.com/boards/logos-book-requests/posts/ladder-of-monks-and-twelve-meditations-cistercian-studies-series-volume-48

Posts 29
Br Damien-Joseph OSB | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 24 2022 7:17 AM

That's great. This is the essential edition.

Posts 1033
Hamilton Ramos | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 24 2022 9:25 AM

mab:
I think if someone switched contemplate for practice in Ezra 7:10 you might wind up with Lectio Divina as an approach to preaching, but it would be dead wrong. 

Maybe it would be good to research what meditatio was about according to reformers to get a better idea of what concepts are involved.

"oratio: prayer.

Oratio, meditatio, tentatio faciunt theologum: Prayer, meditation, and trial make the theologian; a maxim from Luther."

 Muller, R. A. (1985). Dictionary of Latin and Greek theological terms : drawn principally from Protestant scholastic theology (p. 214). Grand Rapids, Mich.: Baker Book House.

 

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DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 24 2022 9:53 AM

As long as people check their motivatio and do a little oratio there shouldn’t be any tentatio to do things without any connectio 😂😂😂 Understatio? 

DAL

Posts 1033
Hamilton Ramos | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Apr 26 2022 1:56 PM

LOL, kindatio.

Now, seriously, this topic is turning out to be very interesting:

"MEDITATIO

This brings us to Luther’s second rule for the study of theology, meditatio. In reflecting further on Psalm 119, Luther observes:

Thus you see in this same psalm David constantly boasts that he will talk, meditate, speak, sing, hear, read, by day and night and always, about nothing except God’s words and commandments.

This kind of scriptural meditation is God’s “external” answer to the “internal” request for understanding. Luther did not conceive of meditatio as searching the inner self or even listening for the Spirit’s voice inside of one’s self. Instead, meditation is “interaction” with the word, where God gives the Spirit. However, this moment takes time and must be repeated. Luther warns against a disposition in which theologians think they have sufficiently meditated upon the sacred text:

And take care that you do not grow weary or think that you have done enough when you have read, heard, and spoken them once or twice, and that you then have complete understanding. You will never be a particularly good theologian if you do that, for you will be like untimely fruit which falls to the ground before it is half ripe.

According to Luther, the theologian must repeatedly return to meditate upon the Scriptures. This is neither an academic nor pietistic ritual. It is a repeated moment within an ongoing triadic experience (oratio, meditatio, tentatio), where God answers the request for certainty in the sacred text through the Spirit again and again."

 Crisler, C. L. (2021). Luther’s Tentatio as the Center of Paul’s Theology. In C. L. Crisler & R. L. Plummer (Eds.), Always Reforming: Reflections on Martin Luther and Biblical Studies (pp. 37–38). Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press.

Is neat to explore what reformers thought, and how it differs from their original tradition. Our challenge is to see how it applies to us.

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Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Apr 26 2022 2:22 PM

Hamilton Ramos:
Luther did not conceive of meditatio as searching the inner self or even listening for the Spirit’s voice inside of one’s self. Instead, meditation is “interaction” with the word, where God gives the Spirit. However, this moment takes time and must be repeated. Luther warns against a disposition in which theologians think they have sufficiently meditated upon the sacred text:

Absolutely and to the best of my knowledge this is true of all mainstream Western Christians. I believe the author confused the meaning of the term which is used differently in Asian religions than in Christianity or he had such a strong prejudice that he was misleading. .

2708 Meditation engages thought, imagination, emotion, and desire. This mobilization of faculties is necessary in order to deepen our convictions of faith, prompt the conversion of our heart, and strengthen our will to follow Christ.

Catholic Church, Catechism of the Catholic Church, 2nd Ed. (Washington, DC: United States Catholic Conference, 2000), 650.

Karl Barth spoke of three basic steps when it comes to reading the Bible: observation (explicatio), reflection (meditatio) and appropriation (applicatio) (Barth 1938: 722–740 [KD I/2, 810–830 = CD I/2, 722–740]).

Mark D. Thompson, A Clear and Present Word: The Clarity of Scripture, ed. D. A. Carson, vol. 21, New Studies in Biblical Theology (England; Downers Grove, IL: Apollos; InterVarsity Press, 2006).

article on Martin Luther:

Principles of Biblical Interpretation. Technically Luther did not have a hermeneutic because hermeneutics is a nineteenth-century discipline that presupposes the distance of the biblical text and the need for the interpreter to bridge the gap and make any interpretative moves necessary to bring the text into modern linguistic jargon understandable in post-Enlightenment philosophy.
To be a theologian, the three rules (1539) of prayer (oratio), meditation (meditatio) and temptation or experience (tentatio) need to be practiced every day. These show Luther indebted to the sacred reading (lectio divina) of Scripture deep in the theological tradition of the church.


Kenneth Hagen, “Luther, Martin (1483–1546),” in Dictionary of Major Biblical Interpreters, ed. Donald K. McKim (Downers Grove, IL; Nottingham, England: InterVarsity Press, 2007), 692.

Martin Luther had three rules for theological research: (1) oratio, the vertical aspect, involving prayer to God for guidance; (2) meditatio, the objective aspect, involving reading and contemplation of various views; and (3) tentatio, the subjective side, involving personal decision regarding the meaning of the text.

Grant R. Osborne and Stephen B. Woodward, Handbook for Bible Study (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Book House, 1979), 140.

In 1539 Luther wrote a preface to the first volume of his German works. In it he reflected on what made a true theologian, combining an interpretation of Psalm 119 with a positive appropriation of a classic monastic approach to reading Scripture. The monks outlined a threefold method: oratio, meditatio, and illuminatio (prayer, meditation, and illumination). Luther, while taking over the first two (although in very idiosyncratic ways), changed the third to its opposite—tentatio (literally, “temptation,” but in the German equivalent, Anfechtung, “assault” or “attack”)—because he was convinced that when one reads Scripture all hell breaks loose.

Timothy J. Wengert, Reading the Bible with Martin Luther: An Introductory Guide (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2013), 123.

Need I continue?

I know your intent was good, even if the guidelines were pushed (as I have done in correcting you). But before posting publicly, you do want to check its accuracy.. 

Hamilton Ramos:
Is neat to explore what reformers thought, and how it differs from their original tradition.

You realize that Martin Luther had very few theological differences from the Augustinian Catholicism of his order. Martin Luther was a reformer in the sense of wanting to clean up the behavior of the church hierarchy. That is why, like the Anglicans, Lutherans often considered themselves a "third way" rather than Protestant (in the sense of Calvin) and why High Lutherans are irate that they can't have a special Ordinate in the Catholic church similar to the Anglican one.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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