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Posts 498
Jordan Litchfield | Forum Activity | Posted: Sat, Jul 16 2022 11:14 PM

I noticed this morning that my copy of the BCP is the Episcopal edition. I live in Northern Ireland, so I was trying to find a Church of England edition, but I couldn't find any either in my library or on the webstore.

Is there a CoE edition available in Logos? If not, are Anglicans (as opposed to Episcopalians) content with that?

Posts 498
Jordan Litchfield | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 22 2022 7:34 AM

BUMP!! Smile

Posts 131
Scot Wright | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 22 2022 11:00 AM

Hi Jordan, 

The only COE Prayer Book that I could find besides the historical 1662 BCP on the Logos platform was this;

https://www.logos.com/product/195868/the-1662-book-of-common-prayer-international-edition 

It is a contemporary language version of the 1662 edition. It seems that you are looking for something more recent. Smile

Scot+ 

 

Posts 498
Jordan Litchfield | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 23 2022 10:44 AM

Scot Wright:

The only COE Prayer Book that I could find besides the historical 1662 BCP on the Logos platform was this;

https://www.logos.com/product/195868/the-1662-book-of-common-prayer-international-edition 

I wasn't aware of that edition. Thanks.

Scot Wright:
It is a contemporary language version of the 1662 edition. It seems that you are looking for something more recent.

However, I am a Methodist just trying to find out what the CoE uses and whether or not it is available on Logos. I would have expected that there would be a different edition for the CoE versus the Episcopalian, if for no other reason than the differences between American and British spelling.

Posts 131
Scot Wright | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 23 2022 2:36 PM

Jordan Litchfield:

Scot Wright:

The only COE Prayer Book that I could find besides the historical 1662 BCP on the Logos platform was this;

https://www.logos.com/product/195868/the-1662-book-of-common-prayer-international-edition 

I wasn't aware of that edition. Thanks.

Scot Wright:
It is a contemporary language version of the 1662 edition. It seems that you are looking for something more recent.

However, I am a Methodist just trying to find out what the CoE uses and whether or not it is available on Logos. I would have expected that there would be a different edition for the CoE versus the Episcopalian, if for no other reason than the differences between American and British spelling.

I believe the COE allows use of all their historical prayer books in worship but the most recent liturgies (1960 to present) are not on the Logos platform as far as I can tell. Of course, the COE has all their prayer book content free online.

Posts 498
Jordan Litchfield | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jul 24 2022 1:08 AM

Scot Wright:
but the most recent liturgies (1960 to present) are not on the Logos platform as far as I can tell.

Okay, thanks for that.

Posts 1930
Ken McGuire | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jul 24 2022 3:52 AM

Scot Wright:
I believe the COE allows use of all their historical prayer books in worship but the most recent liturgies (1960 to present) are not on the Logos platform as far as I can tell. Of course, the COE has all their prayer book content free online.

I am not Anglican, but I am not at all sure this is the case. I know that here in the USA, a local parish did have to get special permission to use a historical liturgy for an anniversary, but ECUSA and CoE do have some differences in the details of their regulations.

I am pretty sure that the newest official BCP for the Church of England is the 1662 one. There was some work for an updated one in the 20th century, but it was roadkill in a combination of church politics between Evangelicals and Anglo-Catholics as well as secular politics, since it would actually have to be officially adopted by the English Parliament. Last I heard - which was a few decades ago - while the Book of Common Prayer is the official book, the most USED book is their "Alternative Service Book", which has caused to joke about how ASB should really be called ANGLICAN Service Book....

Ken McGuire

The Gospel is not ... a "new law," on the contrary, ... a "new life." - William Julius Mann

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Posts 2769
DominicM | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jul 24 2022 2:16 PM

According to Wikipedia:

The Episcopal Church separated itself from the Church of England in 1789, the first church in the American colonies having been founded in 1607.[112] The first Book of Common Prayer of the new body, approved in 1789, had as its main source the 1662 English book, with significant influence also from the 1764 Scottish Liturgy (see above) which Bishop Seabury of Connecticut brought to the USA following his consecration in Aberdeen in 1784.

The preface to the 1789 Book of Common Prayer says, "this Church is far from intending to depart from the Church of England in any essential point of doctrine, discipline, or worship...further than local circumstances require." There were some notable differences. For example, in the Communion service the prayer of consecration follows mainly the Scottish orders derived from 1549 [113] and found in the 1764 Book of Common Prayer. The compilers also used other materials derived from ancient liturgies especially Eastern Orthodox ones such as the Liturgy of St. James.[113] An epiclesis or invocation of the Holy Spirit in the eucharistic prayer was included, as in the Scottish book, though modified to meet reformist objections. Overall however, the book was modelled on the English Prayer Book, the Convention having resisted attempts at more radical deletion and revision.[114]

113 Shepherd 1965, 82.
114 McGarvey & Gibson 1907.

 

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