HP Slate 500 Now Available for Order. Ships Nov 12.

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Anonymous | | Posted: Fri, Oct 22 2010 10:09 AM

I've long used an old Gateway C-120x tablet, with a 12" screen and 5lb weight as my primary Bible.  I've long wanted something smaller and lighter and this looks like the ticket.  Actually, it's the size of the Gateway more than the weight that I have the bigger issue with.  It's just big and awkward to carry around.  The HP Slate is thinner and more like the size of a book and just appears to me it will be more ergonomically easy to carry around at church or fast food restaurants, etc.

The screen resolution is only 1024x600 compared to my Gateway's 1280x800.  I'm someone concerned about that.  I don't think profile mode is going to be very useful.  With the Gateway, there's just enough room for one side bar.  I've suggested to Logos before that they combine the sidebars when the window width is less than 1024 or so.    I don't think sidebars will be usable at all in profile on the HP since the screen width will only be 600 pixels.  But in landscape mode it should be nice.  On the Gateway, I usually use it in profile mode with One Note taking the bottom half and Logos taking the top half of the screen, thus each window ends up being about 800x640.  On the HP I'll have to rely on the task bar to switch between the two applications, but still get about as much real estate for each (a little shorter, but a little wider).

I am a heavy digital ink user and it appears the HP Slate has an active digitizer (thus no worries about palm rejection).  It isn't clear yet whether it's Wacom (I hope) or Ntrig (I hope they've fixed the bugs that plagued them on Dell).  I know Steve Jobs as pronounced that the Stylus is FAIL and the Apple Reality Distortion Field has all the Apple fanboys parroting that.  Having used a stylus for a few years now, I can't imagine taking notes in any other way.  Keyboards are to noise and awkward if you don't have a good desk in front of you (and I never do in note-taking situations) and virtual keyboards require my full visual attention to be on the keyboard since touch typing is impossible.  Plus the ability to write, sketch, color, and highlight quickly makes the stylus simply the best tool for the job.

The hard drive is a 64GB SSD drive, so it should be quiet and somewhat fast, but SSD's aren't as much faster than rotating platters as some of the hype makes them sound.  Between the size of the hard drive and the size of the screen, I'm not planning on installing Adobe Production Bundle on it and trying to do video editing.  LOL.  So, this won't be replacing my Gateway, but mearly supplementing it.  It does mean that I will probably eventually replace the Gateway with a normal laptop instead of a convertable however.  Although I would like to have that Fujutsu T900 with the 13.3 inch screen.  It has an SD slot.  I assume it's SDHC,  although there is a new SD standard now that supports higher capacity SD cards.  SDHC is limited to 32GB.  With any luck it's really SDXC.  I'll probably install Logos on the internal drive, and put any other large datasets on an SD card (like my music collection, or some Logos competetors that I do stilll have and use once in a blue moon).

It comes with a pretty cool dock that serves as an easel.  It also comes with a nice carrying case.  The pen is stored in the flap of the case instead of in the tablet proper like most (all?) previous tabletPCs have done.  The ship date when I ordered is November 12, so I have plenty of time (I hope) if the reviews look bad.

The problem with what reviews I've seen so far is that the reviewers don't really understand the device nor Microsoft's support for touch.  For example, one comlained that the keyboard isn't touch optimized because it floats in its own window.  Yes, you can have it float in a window, or you can set and option in its settings that will dock it.  More importantly, with a stylus supporting tablet, you rarely even use the software keyboard.  Handwriting text is far more efficient.  I only use they software keyboard for passwords or a couple places in Logos where they have a bug that ignores the handwritten text (basically any text field that is in a drop down form instead of in a floating form: for example, the library if it isn't in a floating window or tab).

Posts 3883
Floyd Johnson | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 22 2010 10:14 AM

Jeffrey Glen Jackson:
I've long used an old Gateway C-120x tablet, with a 12" screen and 5lb weight as my primary Bible.  I've long wanted something smaller and lighter and this looks like the ticket.  Actually, it's the size of the Gateway more than the weight that I have the bigger issue with.  It's just big and awkward to carry around.  The HP Slate is thinner and more like the size of a book and just appears to me it will be more ergonomically easy to carry around at church or fast food restaurants, etc.

Here is a link:  HP Slate 500

Blessings,
Floyd

Pastor-Patrick.blogspot.com

Posts 301
Jerry Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 22 2010 11:43 AM

I'm watching this too . . . been trying to come up my "electronic Bible" for quite awhile and just can't find the right combo for power and size. Since ALL study is now done in Logos, it's tough leaving the desktop/laptop behind . . .!

Posts 219
Dennis Miller | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 22 2010 12:13 PM

For the price they are asking for this joke of a device just buy a laptop. You can get entry level MacAir for just a couple of hundred more and have 2x + the computing power. You have to really want a Windows iPad wanna be to buy this thing.

Posts 3230
Tes | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 22 2010 4:02 PM

Jeffrey Glen Jackson:

I've long used an old Gateway C-120x tablet, with a 12" screen and 5lb weight as my primary Bible.  I've long wanted something smaller and lighter and this looks like the ticket.  Actually, it's the size of the Gateway more than the weight that I have the bigger issue with.  It's just big and awkward to carry around.  The HP Slate is thinner and more like the size of a book and just appears to me it will be more ergonomically easy to carry around at church or fast food restaurants, etc.

The screen resolution is only 1024x600 compared to my Gateway's 1280x800.  I'm someone concerned about that.  I don't think profile mode is going to be very useful.  With the Gateway, there's just enough room for one side bar.  I've suggested to Logos before that they combine the sidebars when the window width is less than 1024 or so.    I don't think sidebars will be usable at all in profile on the HP since the screen width will only be 600 pixels.  But in landscape mode it should be nice.  On the Gateway, I usually use it in profile mode with One Note taking the bottom half and Logos taking the top half of the screen, thus each window ends up being about 800x640.  On the HP I'll have to rely on the task bar to switch between the two applications, but still get about as much real estate for each (a little shorter, but a little wider).

I am a heavy digital ink user and it appears the HP Slate has an active digitizer (thus no worries about palm rejection).  It isn't clear yet whether it's Wacom (I hope) or Ntrig (I hope they've fixed the bugs that plagued them on Dell).  I know Steve Jobs as pronounced that the Stylus is FAIL and the Apple Reality Distortion Field has all the Apple fanboys parroting that.  Having used a stylus for a few years now, I can't imagine taking notes in any other way.  Keyboards are to noise and awkward if you don't have a good desk in front of you (and I never do in note-taking situations) and virtual keyboards require my full visual attention to be on the keyboard since touch typing is impossible.  Plus the ability to write, sketch, color, and highlight quickly makes the stylus simply the best tool for the job.

The hard drive is a 64GB SSD drive, so it should be quiet and somewhat fast, but SSD's aren't as much faster than rotating platters as some of the hype makes them sound.  Between the size of the hard drive and the size of the screen, I'm not planning on installing Adobe Production Bundle on it and trying to do video editing.  LOL.  So, this won't be replacing my Gateway, but mearly supplementing it.  It does mean that I will probably eventually replace the Gateway with a normal laptop instead of a convertable however.  Although I would like to have that Fujutsu T900 with the 13.3 inch screen.  It has an SD slot.  I assume it's SDHC,  although there is a new SD standard now that supports higher capacity SD cards.  SDHC is limited to 32GB.  With any luck it's really SDXC.  I'll probably install Logos on the internal drive, and put any other large datasets on an SD card (like my music collection, or some Logos competetors that I do stilll have and use once in a blue moon).

It comes with a pretty cool dock that serves as an easel.  It also comes with a nice carrying case.  The pen is stored in the flap of the case instead of in the tablet proper like most (all?) previous tabletPCs have done.  The ship date when I ordered is November 12, so I have plenty of time (I hope) if the reviews look bad.

The problem with what reviews I've seen so far is that the reviewers don't really understand the device nor Microsoft's support for touch.  For example, one comlained that the keyboard isn't touch optimized because it floats in its own window.  Yes, you can have it float in a window, or you can set and option in its settings that will dock it.  More importantly, with a stylus supporting tablet, you rarely even use the software keyboard.  Handwriting text is far more efficient.  I only use they software keyboard for passwords or a couple places in Logos where they have a bug that ignores the handwritten text (basically any text field that is in a drop down form instead of in a floating form: for example, the library if it isn't in a floating window or tab).

May the Lord bless you for this detail explanation,I am amazed how you and Rosie make detail explanation.

Blessings in Christ.

Posts 3004
Forum MVP
Jacob Hantla | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 22 2010 4:22 PM

Wonder how it'll handle Logos. Could be a great portable option for Logos. I'd be all over this, especially if it runs Logos well. 

Jacob Hantla
Pastor/Elder, Grace Bible Church
gbcaz.org

Posts 28
Karen Campbell | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 22 2010 4:25 PM

This is intriguing. Hmm

I've been waiting for a tablet with stylus (had a Gateway Tablet PC a few years ago). Was hoping Apple would come up with a tablet that runs OS X (lite or something) to complement my MacBook Pro. The iPad is a disappointment. I run Windows (for Microsoft Office and Logos) using Parallels, so having a Windows tablet isn't a deal breaker.

Posts 3883
Floyd Johnson | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 22 2010 5:03 PM

I most interested in finding out how well it handles handwriting.  I have had a couple of tablets that handle handwriting relatively well - but I have one netbook tablet that does not respond well to handwriting at all.  Looking forward to a review that feature.

Note - I am not particularly fond of watching videos - the published reviews will be more interesting.  

Blessings,
Floyd

Pastor-Patrick.blogspot.com

Posts 2893
Kevin A. Purcell | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Oct 24 2010 2:22 PM

Floyd Johnson:

I most interested in finding out how well it handles handwriting.  I have had a couple of tablets that handle handwriting relatively well - but I have one netbook tablet that does not respond well to handwriting at all.  Looking forward to a review that feature.

Note - I am not particularly fond of watching videos - the published reviews will be more interesting.  

 

Because it has an N-Trig digitizer (part of screen that recognizes pen input instead of touch) it should be pretty good at recognizing pen input.

Posts 3883
Floyd Johnson | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Oct 24 2010 2:56 PM

Kevin A. Purcell:
Because it has an N-Trig digitizer (part of screen that recognizes pen input instead of touch) it should be pretty good at recognizing pen input.

If this proves to be true, I will be looking forward to getting one.  Sadly, my most recent tablet (HP TouchSmart tm2) was purchased this past March - too early for a second purchase at this point.  Maybe next year at this time, if they survive that long.Crying

Blessings,
Floyd

Pastor-Patrick.blogspot.com

Posts 2893
Kevin A. Purcell | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Oct 25 2010 6:45 PM

Floyd Johnson:

Kevin A. Purcell:
Because it has an N-Trig digitizer (part of screen that recognizes pen input instead of touch) it should be pretty good at recognizing pen input.

If this proves to be true, I will be looking forward to getting one.  Sadly, my most recent tablet (HP TouchSmart tm2) was purchased this past March - too early for a second purchase at this point.  Maybe next year at this time, if they survive that long.Crying

The only reason to go with the HP Slate 500 over what you have is size and portability. Yours is much more powerful. I would bet by this time next year that we will have a much better idea of where tablets will be headed and I also suspect that the iPad version of Logos will be a much more mature product due to the way they are moving right now.

Posts 147
John Murphy | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 26 2010 1:22 AM

Um...yeah...suggest an iPad.

Anonymous | | Replied: Tue, Oct 26 2010 7:13 AM

John Murphy:

Um...yeah...suggest an iPad.

 

The iPad is a great solution for a lot of people, but not for me. 

First of all, all my resources are not available on iPad.  There is no guarantee that Logos will be able to sort out all the licensing issues to ever make that possible. 

Second, Logos may eventually reproduce all the Logos4 functionality in the iPad software, but I can't use software from 2015, only software that exists in 2010.

Third, my usual workflow involves using Logos4 and OneNote simulataniously.  Not only does iPad not have an application comperable to OneNote, nor the hardware (i.e., a stylus) to use OneNote to its full potential, but it doesn't support actually running to such applications at the same time.  Further, in the final stages of writing an essay (or book), I'll be using Word or Adobe FrameMaker.  iPad has nothing comperable to those either. 

As I usually put it, I need applications, not apps, to get my work done.   For many people, such as high school students writing 500 word essays, I'm sure the iPad apps are wonderful. 

I've been using TabletPCs for years, and only rarely resort to using the keyboard.  Microsoft's handwriting recognition is great, and it makes it enjoyable for me to curl up on the patio swing or gravity chair and write on something that resembles a notepad without having to balance an awkward notebook on my lap.

The important thing to remember is that the tablet form factor is not Highlander.  There need not be "only one."  In fact, we'll all be better off if there are many because then they'll have to compete.  Without competition, innovation will NOT happen, not even for Apple.

Posts 28
Karen Campbell | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 26 2010 11:44 AM

Jeffrey Glen Jackson:
As I usually put it, I need applications, not apps, to get my work done.

Yes

Posts 2745
Bohuslav Wojnar | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 26 2010 12:45 PM

Jeffrey Glen Jackson:
The HP Slate is thinner and more like the size of a book and just appears to me it will be more ergonomically easy to carry around at church or fast food restaurants, etc.

Jeffrey, it looks to me you found my next device Smile. I always wanted something like iPad but with Windows 7. For me full size Logos 4 with all it's power, library and voice reading, simply the best solution. Before Logos will work that way on other platforms I can wear down HP Slate. I have to ask HP when we can see it here in Czechia.

Bohuslav

Posts 3883
Floyd Johnson | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 26 2010 8:29 PM

Jeffrey Glen Jackson:
John Murphy:
Um...yeah...suggest an iPad.
The iPad is a great solution for a lot of people, but not for me. 

First of all, all my resources are not available on iPad.  There is no guarantee that Logos will be able to sort out all the licensing issues to ever make that possible. 

Second, Logos may eventually reproduce all the Logos4 functionality in the iPad software, but I can't use software from 2015, only software that exists in 2010.

Third, my usual workflow involves using Logos4 and OneNote simulataniously.  Not only does iPad not have an application comperable to OneNote, nor the hardware (i.e., a stylus) to use OneNote to its full potential, but it doesn't support actually running to such applications at the same time.  Further, in the final stages of writing an essay (or book), I'll be using Word or Adobe FrameMaker.  iPad has nothing comperable to those either. 

As I usually put it, I need applications, not apps, to get my work done.   For many people, such as high school students writing 500 word essays, I'm sure the iPad apps are wonderful. 

I've been using TabletPCs for years, and only rarely resort to using the keyboard.  Microsoft's handwriting recognition is great, and it makes it enjoyable for me to curl up on the patio swing or gravity chair and write on something that resembles a notepad without having to balance an awkward notebook on my lap.

The important thing to remember is that the tablet form factor is not Highlander.  There need not be "only one."  In fact, we'll all be better off if there are many because then they'll have to compete.  Without competition, innovation will NOT happen, not even for Apple.

Good summary of why I keep coming back to the PC Tablet - even though I occasionally buy desktops and notebooks.   

Blessings,
Floyd

Pastor-Patrick.blogspot.com

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