Indexing == Torture test

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David Ames | Forum Activity | Posted: Tue, Mar 1 2011 4:37 AM

I have an I-3 Intel duo core duo thread – Have seen all four ‘cores’ in use with 1 or 2 over 95% and the others near 75%

Last night I saw all four logical cores at 95 to 100% - Has indexing been re-tuned to turn it into a torture test for our PC’s?  [And the fans were going crazy!]

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spitzerpl | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 1 2011 4:44 AM

Hmmm...Torture to torment or trial to prove? That is the question :-)

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Allen Browne | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 1 2011 5:20 AM

David Ames:
I have an I-3 Intel duo core duo thread – Have seen all four ‘cores’ in use with 1 or 2 over 95% and the others near 75%

Last night I saw all four logical cores at 95 to 100% - Has indexing been re-tuned to turn it into a torture test for our PC’s?  [And the fans were going crazy!]

Naturally enough, indexing is a CPU-intensive task, so perhaps you could use it as a torture test for your system. Smile

Seriously though, I would much prefer to do the indexing of my files on my laptop rather than expect them to do it on the server.

With a good processor (i7) indexing a 2500 volume library runs the CPU at about 50% for a couple of hours.

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David Ames | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 1 2011 7:00 AM

Philip Spitzer:

Hmmm...Torture to torment or trial to prove? That is the question :-)

Trial to prove - gets my vote - My machine can take it - I went to sleep letting it take care of it self - the banner said that it would take 2 hours. And going by times on the index files that is what it took. 

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Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 1 2011 4:30 PM

 

David Ames:
I have an I-3 Intel duo core duo thread – Have seen all four ‘cores’ in use with 1 or 2 over 95% and the others near 75%

I've noticed four threads ("logical cores") used for resource indexing on my dual core i5, contrary to previous statements from Logos that they allocate only two threads for resource indexing, with 4 threads on a quad core processor (my desktop i7 has 8 "logical cores" but only 4 threads are allocated for resources indexing).

The same can happen on an i3 because of hyperthreading, so I wonder if Logos is misreading the "cores" on the newer processors?

Dave
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LogosEmployee

Dave Hooton:

The same can happen on an i3 because of hyperthreading, so I wonder if Logos is misreading the "cores" on the newer processors?

We just use the figure that the OS reports (which is the number of logical processors); this does not distinguish between physical and hyper-threaded cores. Indexing currently uses a maximum of four threads; this might be allocated to two hyper-threaded cores, or four physical cores (depending on your underlying hardware); the latter will be significantly faster.

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David Ames | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 2 2011 4:16 AM

David Ames:

I have an I-3 Intel duo core duo thread – Have seen all four ‘cores’ in use with 1 or 2 over 95% and the others near 75%

UPDATE: the indexing for the latest L4 update took three hours [2008 resources]

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Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 2 2011 2:47 PM

Bradley Grainger:
We just use the figure that the OS reports (which is the number of logical processors);

Thanks for the clarification.

Dave
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Windows 11 & Android 8

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Jeff Causey | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 2 2011 5:47 PM

This turned into a major problem for me with this latest update as I have a bad fan on my laptop.  The indexer can't run for more than a few minutes before it would push the cpu temp into a critical range (after previous shutdowns, I now monitor the temp pretty close and know when to pause it).  I found a solution tonight using a utility called Battle Encoder Shirase that will let you limit the cpu usage of specific processes.  It has been running now for about an hour on my laptop set to keep the Logos indexer to consuming no more than 60% of the cpu resources.  So far so good - temp is a little elevated, but it is stable.  Of course, after an hour, only 20% of the indexing is done.

Just wanted to pass this along in case someone else may need a solution to a similar problem.  I have mine running on a Windows Vista SP1 machine.

Posts 235
Tom Geswein | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 2 2011 7:23 PM

For some reason, Logos indexing requires me to open my case and put a large fan blowing on the CPU area of the MB, just to get it to index without shutting down the computer.  This was discussed in another thread here.  I may check out the utilitly that you mentioned, until I can figure out what is causing the overheating...

"It seems our problems solve themselves when we look beyond us to those truly in hell."  -  Beyond Our Suffering - AILD

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Jeff Forrest | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 2 2011 8:57 PM

Thanks for the tip on BES. I have an old AMD dual core laptop and it always crashes every few minutes during the indexing after an application update.  I have it running through BES right now at 40% and it cooled down and is doing fine.  I don't care how long it takes, as long as it completes the indexing.

Thanks again,

Jeff Forrest 

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David Ames | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 2 2011 9:05 PM

Tom Geswein:

For some reason, Logos indexing requires me to open my case and put a large fan blowing on the CPU area of the MB, just to get it to index without shutting down the computer.  This was discussed in another thread here.  I may check out the utility that you mentioned, until I can figure out what is causing the overheating...

We got just what we asked for - faster indexing - that mean higher usage of the cores [up to 4 cores and at over 95% continuous usage]

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David Paul | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 2 2011 9:19 PM

The indexing I'm going through right now is the looooooongest one yet, as far as I recall. This one seems like it will go over 12 hours. Meh.Surprise

ASROCK x570 Creator, AMD R9 3950x, HyperX 64gb 3600 RAM, Asus Strix RTX 2080 ti, 2tb m.2 Seagate Firecuda SSD (x2) ...and other mechano-digital happiness.

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Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 2 2011 11:36 PM

David Ames:
We got just what we asked for - faster indexing - that mean higher usage of the cores

Not necessarily, as the Logos strategy (see Bradley's reply) hasn't changed. The new generation of hyper-threaded dual core processors (i3, i5) has probably put more stress on the two actual cores than the older generation dual cores without hyper-threading because they are indexing twice as many resources at a time (4 vs.2). The software indexing performance has improved dramatically since Sept '09, but recent performance has dropped a little, perhaps because of the new index format and the extra indexing for Large Text.

Dave
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Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 3 2011 3:39 AM

Dave Hooton:

Bradley Grainger:
We just use the figure that the OS reports (which is the number of logical processors);

Thanks for the clarification.

Reflecting on previous discussions, Bradley, I had thought L4 used physical processors. It would be better to use that figure because hyper-threading is less efficient than using physical cores ie. 2 indexing threads for all dual core processors and 4 threads for quad core.

Dave
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Windows 11 & Android 8

Posts 291
Bob Schlessman | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 3 2011 4:19 AM

Obviously indexing is a CPU intensive process. My system rebuilt the index after the SR-1 index and using all four physical cores the peak temperatures were Core 0 - 54 C (129 F), Core 1 - 47 C (116 F), Core 2 - 55 C (131 F) and Core 3 - 61 C (141 F). Normal temperatures run around 39 C (100 F) for all four cores. This is on an overclocked CPU and graphics adaptor. The system wasn't even close to being stressed as I've seen much higher temps while playing a 3D game.

If you are experiencing shutdowns due to overheating while indexing then you have insufficient cooling. That may be due to poor design or you may have dust buildup in your system. The first one is beyond your control. The second you can remedy by doing a thorough system cleaning. If you don't feel comfortable taking the covers off and poking around the inside of your computer then I would strongly suggest taking it to somebody who can do it for you, be it a computer shop or a tech savvy friend. It is also possible as was mentioned earlier that you have a defective fan. These are inexpensive to buy and easy to replace on most systems. Obviously laptops are more difficult but not impossible.

Blessings,

Bob

 

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TCBlack | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 3 2011 6:36 AM

Bob Schlessman:
If you are experiencing shutdowns due to overheating while indexing then you have insufficient cooling. That may be due to poor design or you may have dust buildup in your system.
 As for my laptops, I rarely dissasemble them to dust them (though I have in extreme cases).  I've got an air compressor in the garage so I generally crank it up to full pressure and use a nozzle to blow through the vents.  Just a couple things to remember if you do this.

 (1)  Open the garage doors, you won't believe the amount of dust you'll be forced to inhale if you don't.  

(2)  Give a test blast into the air to make sure there's no moisture in theline that is going to end up inside your computer.

 (3) DON'T leave the computer on!  Unplug it, remove the battery and any dongles attached.  Then blow through the vents until no more dust exists the other vents.

 I've been doing this for years with no ill effects.

Hmm Sarcasm is my love language. Obviously I love you. 

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Bob Schlessman | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 3 2011 3:43 PM

Thomas Black:
I've been doing this for years with no ill effects.

Just a few words of caution. If you are doing this with standard compressed air that does not have a deionizer attached there is a risk of developing a static charge that could potentially damage the computer. Also, blowing compressed air through a system this way can also cause any cooling fans to turn at a much higher speed than they are designed to do causing damage to the bearings (or sleeves depending on the fan) and leading to premature failure. 

Blessings,

Bob

Posts 8660
TCBlack | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 3 2011 6:34 PM

I hadn't thought about those considerations Bob.  The fan speed doesn't concern me much but I'll think a bit on the ionization.

Hmm Sarcasm is my love language. Obviously I love you. 

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