Greek Resource

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Posts 63
Bryan Speer | Forum Activity | Posted: Tue, Apr 19 2011 11:52 AM

Does anybody know of a Greek resource I can use to pull off all the NT (and LXX if possible) verbs and their root forms?  I don't think a straight query will work.

Posts 418
davidphillips | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Apr 19 2011 12:06 PM

Quickly? Not that I know of. But a query can work:

Create a collection containing the NA27 and the LXX

Search that collection for @V

Once the search populates, select "Analysis"

Once this loads, make the window wide enough so you can see the "Lemma" column.

Drag the Lemma column to where it says "Drag a column here to group by that column".

Collapse each lemma by clicking the little down arrow (note in the picture below, my search is just on the NA27, not the LXX as well).

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Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Apr 19 2011 4:56 PM

LXX with Logos Morphology has 95,999 results for all Verbs, but Morph Search Analysis limited to showing first 10,000 resutls:

Option: restrict passage for less than 10,000 results, export list to a spreadsheet, then combine lists.

Keep Smiling Smile

Posts 63
Bryan Speer | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Apr 19 2011 10:14 PM

Thanks for the response.  What I am looking for is the root of the verb not the Lemma. 

I don't think this resource exists which is why I am asking....but a list of all roots and their associated stems (present, future, aorist..) 

Bal (think of the Greek letters) is the root but Ball is the present stem.  Basically the bal root and all the stems bal appears in within the NT and LXX.  Then repeat that for each verb.

Posts 93
Brent Gay | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Apr 19 2011 10:30 PM

Have you tried the Lexham Analytical Lexicon to the Greek NT? It provides you with the various cognates of a word and how they are used.

Even if this is not exactly what you are looking for, this is a nice resource to be familiar with for Greek studies, IMO. Also, check out his post for instructions on how to search for all the different forms.

Brent

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Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Apr 19 2011 11:03 PM

Bryan Speer:

Thanks for the response.  What I am looking for is the root of the verb not the Lemma. 

I don't think this resource exists which is why I am asking....but a list of all roots and their associated stems (present, future, aorist..) 

Bal (think of the Greek letters) is the root but Ball is the present stem.  Basically the bal root and all the stems bal appears in within the NT and LXX.  Then repeat that for each verb.

A Morph Search for lemma finds associated tenses, which can be compared with Lexham Analytical Lexicon to the Greek New Testament:

Keep Smiling Smile

Posts 19635
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Apr 19 2011 11:05 PM

Bryan, you might be interested in Building Your New Testament Greek Vocabulary, which includes lists of NT Greek Vocabulary listed by cognate (words sharing the same root/stem):

And it's got charts of common suffixes and how they affect the meaning when appended to roots/stems:

But note that it doesn't list the actual "stems" or "roots" of the cognate words, and here's why, as explained in this footnote on p. 5: "Although we speak of 'building' words from the 'stem,' note that these stems (which some grammarians call 'roots') probably never had any existence apart from the words in their families. Stems or roots are abstractions from existing words, made for linguistic purposes. What T. O. Lambdin says about Hebrew roots is applicable to the Greek language: 'The root is a grammatical abstraction from [cognate] words and not vice-versa; that is, because a root has no existence apart from its incorporation into words, it leads to a misunderstanding of the nature of language to say that words are derived from the root' (Introduction to Biblical Hebrew [New York: Scribners, 1971] 18). If this is recognized, the notion of stems/roots can be used as a valid grammatical construct in studying word formation and learning the vocabulary of the Greek New Testament."

Posts 47
David McClister | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Apr 20 2011 5:55 AM

You may also run into a problem with the fact that the ancients sometimes used different roots for different tenses of the same word.

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Apr 20 2011 5:15 PM

Rosie Perera:
But note that it doesn't list the actual "stems" or "roots" of the cognate words, and here's why, as explained in this footnote on p. 5: "Although we speak of 'building' words from the 'stem,' note that these stems (which some grammarians call 'roots') probably never had any existence apart from the words in their families. Stems or roots are abstractions from existing words, made for linguistic purposes. What T. O. Lambdin says about Hebrew roots is applicable to the Greek language: 'The root is a grammatical abstraction from [cognate] words and not vice-versa; that is, because a root has no existence apart from its incorporation into words, it leads to a misunderstanding of the nature of language to say that words are derived from the root' (Introduction to Biblical Hebrew [New York: Scribners, 1971] 18). If this is recognized, the notion of stems/roots can be used as a valid grammatical construct in studying word formation and learning the vocabulary of the Greek New Testament."

This may or may not be true for Greek as an Indo-European language. Pāṇini in the 4th century BC based his grammar on roots not lemmas in part because the concept of "word" gets very squirrelly. Dictionaries are also based on roots not lemmas. To me it appears that we need to know more about language acquistion by children before we make judgments as to the "natural" units of language. I personally hope that research will find the morpheme to be the natural unit. 

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Apr 20 2011 5:17 PM

David McClister:
ancients sometimes used different roots for different tenses of the same word.

Yup - I'm so ancient I use different roots for go and went Big Smile. Seriously, this is part of the reason one should know a bit of historical linguistics when jumping into Greek. I would assume that the same holds for Hebrew.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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