Academic Pricing in Beta!

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TCBlack | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jul 26 2011 7:22 AM

Dan Pritchett:
Please let us know your thoughts by replying in this thread so we can get your feedback.

We've got a visual issue I think:
The first time I searched for CULVER I got four headers I thought at first that it was inappropriately giving one instance of the banner for the header and one for each result.  But refreshing the page returns it to only one banner.  

Surely this is a bug that ought to be hunted down and killed.  :-)

Hmm Sarcasm is my love language. Obviously I love you. 

Posts 38
Ryan Riley | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jul 26 2011 10:05 AM

That's generally a site caching issue. We'll track it down. Thanks for reporting it!

Ryan

Posts 249
BriM | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 29 2011 11:18 AM

Dan Pritchett:
Please let us know your thoughts by replying in this thread so we can get your feedback.

1) When I tried to upload my validation document it tried then complained that it was too big (4MB) and I had to start again from scratch. It didn't tell me how big the file had to be but I was successful with a file of 1.6MB. I was surprised it didn't upload after I'd selected but rather attempted to do so after the whole form had been submitted.

2) The class level terminology seems geared to the American system and uses terms unfamiliar to British (and perhaps other nationalities).

Other than that, it went quite well.

Posts 117
Kenny Larsen | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Aug 26 2011 9:59 AM

Can we please have litre helping question marks? Being from the UK I have no idea what a credit hour is, nor how I would convert to it (I randomly picked a middle number Wink)!

Oh, and as an aside theres no mention of what degree is acceptable - previously there was no issue with me not being on a Theology related degree, does anyone know if this is still the case?

Thanks!

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JT (alabama24) | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Aug 26 2011 10:11 AM

Kenny - 

I can't help you with Academic Pricing issues, but I can answer what a "credit hour" is. In most schools, one class is "3 credit hours." This means that it meets for 3 hours each week over the course of the semester [it could be 3 hours on one day or 1 hour 3 days]. A semester is generally 4 months long and there are 2 a year. Some schools do "intensives" during the summer which shorten the time frame one takes a course.

An undergraduate degree is usually 120 "credit hours" or 40 courses. A "Master of Divinity" is often 90 "credit hours," or 30 courses. Undergraduate "full time" is generally 12 "credit hours" a semester; Graduate "full time" is 9 "credit hours."

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Kenny Larsen | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Aug 26 2011 10:23 AM

Thanks for that - I guessed about right then! Perhaps it would be worth Logos adding these guidelines amounts so people in other systems can convert.

Posts 249
BriM | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Aug 30 2011 1:11 AM

Kenny Larsen:
Perhaps it would be worth Logos adding these guidelines amounts so people in other systems can convert.

Yes, I'd agree that there ought to be some way of understanding what to enter.

I put in the number of hours of study I'm supposed to do each week as I thought that was what a "credit hour" would be. I'm distance learning so I don't attend any formal classes and therefore the above definition would suggest I should enter zero. I don't think that either figure is what was intended but have no idea what I should have put in.

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JT (alabama24) | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Aug 30 2011 4:18 AM

BriM - 

If you are a distance learning student for an accredited school in the US, you will have "credit hours." Call your academic advisor if you are unsure what they are. There is no correlation between "how much you put in" each week and credit hours. The formula I gave explains what the term means more than anything. Even with Distance Learning, someone, somewhere was responsible for determining that the course you are taking is worthy of 3 credit hours. Most courses in the states (for an accredited college or university) will be 3 credit hours.

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BriM | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Aug 30 2011 4:47 AM

Ah, but I'm UK, not US.

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JT (alabama24) | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Aug 30 2011 6:41 AM

BriM:
 Ah, but I'm UK, not US. 

Ah, OK. My bad. Smile Maybe if I ask you some questions, we can figure it out a bit.

1) How many courses are required for a bachelor's (4 year) degree?

2 ) Do you generally divide up into 2 "semesters," 3 "trimesters", 4 "quarters" or something else entirely?

3) Are most classes the same length, or do some go for 4 months, while others go for 8?

 

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BriM | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Aug 30 2011 7:28 AM

A standard bachelor's degree takes 3 years and would need 120 credits per year that come from modules earning 10, 20, 30 or 40 credits each. The year is broken into 3 terms of about 10 weeks each.

For distance learning, it takes 3 times as long, so my course is 9 years, doing 40 credits per year. I have to do 10 hours of study per week, including course notes, books and assessments. A 20-credit module for me takes 6 months

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JT (alabama24) | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Aug 30 2011 8:12 AM

BriM - 

I do not work for Logos, but here are my thoughts.

I did some research after I read your post and think that it would be best to look at a "year" rather than a "degree." In the US, Bachelors degrees are normally 4 years. Based upon your post and additional research on my part, it looks like in the UK they are 3 years. If a year's worth of work is 120 UK credits, that would be equivalent to 30 "credit hours" in the US [120 UK credits = 30 credit hours].

If you are asked how many "credit hours" you are taking in the semester,

1. Figure out how many credits you will take in a year: [120]

2. Since a semester is half of a year, divide that number by 2: [60]

3. Divide that number by 4: [15]

I know that you are in a distance learning program, but if I understand you correctly, the system is the same, it just takes longer. That is potentially true in the US as well. In many programs here, distance learning students have the flexibility to accelerate or slow down a degree. For example, a student can finish a "4 year" degree in 3 years or 8. A student is considered full time if they are on schedule to finish in 5 years [12 credit hours per semester for 10 semesters]. Anything less than 12 credit hours is considered "part time."

I think it would be best to contact Logos, but if you don't get a response, I think that my formula is within the spirit (if not letter) of the law.

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