Referring to PBs in an academic paper

Page 1 of 1 (5 items)
This post has 4 Replies | 0 Followers

Posts 1875
Paul-C | Forum Activity | Posted: Thu, Dec 1 2011 6:53 AM

Has anyone referred to, or quoted from, any Personal Books they have incorporated into Logos 4 in any academic papers they have written?

I was thinking of the example of, say, an out of copyright work which you have incorporated into PB and then want to quote from in your paper.  Presumably the page numbers of your PB might not correspond to a formal edition of the work since you may have formatted it differently.  Therefore, would you still cite that work in your paper in general terms, or do you steer clear of citing from such works, and stick to "properly published" works?

This was just a thought I had as I was building a PB recently and I'd be interested to know people's views.

Posts 5573
Forum MVP
Rich DeRuiter | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 1 2011 8:20 AM

Paul Clarke:
Has anyone referred to, or quoted from, any Personal Books they have incorporated into Logos 4 in any academic papers they have written?

I haven't. However I have quoted from regular copyrighted materials from Logos without page numbers. The format is described in academic standards as "quoting from electronic works." This could refer to on-line works, such works in PDF format, and/or such works in Logos format (etc.). Page numbers are not required if they are not provided. However, it seems some academic institutions don't follow the standards they subscribe to on this point. It would be best to consult with a representative of your institution on this point.

One further point may be that, since your PB came from somewhere, you ought to cite the source as the place you found it online (e.g. CCEL.org), or any other source provided within the work or at the site you found it.

 Help links: WIKI;  Logos 6 FAQ. (Phil. 2:14, NIV)

Posts 30823
Forum MVP
JT (alabama24) | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 1 2011 8:26 AM

Paul - 

My personal opinion is that you should ask your professor what his or her preference may be. Ultimately, that is all that really matters. I see several options:

  1. Your professor may require you to have the printed page numbers. Personally I think that is ridiculous and a hardship for students, without any real benefit. Sometimes in life however, you just have to play the game.
  2. Your professor may want you to give some sort of reference from where you got the material (i.e. the website where you found the material)
  3. Your professor may allow you to use a logos reference for the citation, which would be the best case scenario.

macOS, iOS & iPadOS | Logs |  Install

Posts 1875
Paul-C | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 1 2011 9:50 AM

Thanks for your posts guys.  Much appreciated.

Posts 112
Keith Gant | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 1 2011 10:48 AM

Google Books is a good tool to add to your arsenal for academic work. If a work is out of copyright, there’s a fair chance GB will have the full work available as a PDF download. It will have a photo-representation of each page so you can get the page numbers.

But even for recent works, go into GB (or even just Google) and search for a long string of text such as half of a sentence from your work, putting the text in quotes for an exact search. GB will often return a hit giving you the name of your book and the page number for that text (which is all that you need), even if it appears on a page which is not available for viewing in GB.

Page 1 of 1 (5 items) | RSS