Learning Greek

Page 1 of 1 (10 items)
This post has 9 Replies | 0 Followers

Posts 249
BriM | Forum Activity | Posted: Tue, Dec 20 2011 10:32 AM

I'm starting my first Greek class next year and wondering how it will relate to Logos.

My coursebook is paper-based with exercises to complete and a lot of memorisation. Scanning the notes, I can see towards the end that they talk about grammars, texts, apparatuses, BDAG etc. but I get the impression I'm supposed to steer away from these whilst I'm learning.

I was wondering how others have found the experience of learning Greek whilst having Logos. Is it good to leave off the computer whilst I'm learning or should I stick with Logos and forget the dead tree?

Posts 8666
TCBlack | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 20 2011 10:50 AM

I would limit my time with Logos during the early learning phase.  Nothing and I mean nothing will help your Greek like (1) Learning the vocabulary and (2) reading the NT in Greek - even the parts you don't understand - understanding comes through learning the vocab and the accompanying morphology rules and reading, reading, reading, reading.

Hmm Sarcasm is my love language. Obviously I love you. 

Posts 450
Alexander | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 20 2011 11:29 AM

Thomas Black:

I would limit my time with Logos during the early learning phase.  Nothing and I mean nothing will help your Greek like (1) Learning the vocabulary and (2) reading the NT in Greek - even the parts you don't understand - understanding comes through learning the vocab and the accompanying morphology rules and reading, reading, reading, reading.

 

Here is the most encouraging part of learning Greek... you can start reading the NT in Greek very quickly. The whole thing cover to cover. It may take time to understanding it but you can sure learn to read it quickly :)

Posts 103
Jason | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 20 2011 12:13 PM

Thomas Black:

I would limit my time with Logos during the early learning phase.  Nothing and I mean nothing will help your Greek like (1) Learning the vocabulary and (2) reading the NT in Greek - even the parts you don't understand - understanding comes through learning the vocab and the accompanying morphology rules and reading, reading, reading, reading.

I would agree with Thomas's advice here. Go easy on the Logos part until you get your feet wet for a semester or so.

the ancient art of shalom: thots on sustainable spirituality in san francisco - http://me.jasonkuo.com/thots

Posts 12514
Forum MVP
NB.Mick | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 20 2011 12:17 PM

Thomas Black:

I would limit my time with Logos during the early learning phase.  Nothing and I mean nothing will help your Greek like (1) Learning the vocabulary and (2) reading the NT in Greek - even the parts you don't understand - understanding comes through learning the vocab and the accompanying morphology rules and reading, reading, reading, reading.

However, I found Logos to be very beneficial as it can have Prof. Schwandt read it to me - coming to grips with the greek alphabet for the reading reading reading may be easier (http://www.logos.com/product/4207/greek-audio-new-testament ).  

Running Logos 9 latest (beta) version on Win 10

Posts 8666
TCBlack | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 20 2011 12:24 PM

MIck, quite right if you desire to stick with the Erasmian pronunciation which is dominant in (western?) seminaries.  

For auditory learners, hearing while you read along would be excellent.

Hmm Sarcasm is my love language. Obviously I love you. 

Posts 1883
Philana Crouch | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 20 2011 12:36 PM

Also you could use the exegetical guide by setting it to only show words of a specific frequency (words you don't learn as vocab) this could be printed and used to help you read. I remember purchasing a book that did this by Kubo, but since I can make my own with Logos I don't use it. Also you might want to check if your textbook is available in Logos. Mine is now, I intend to purchase it (as the binding in my original copy was so poor my entire class had our books split on us).

Blessings,

Philana

Posts 15805
Forum MVP
Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 20 2011 10:51 PM

BriM:
Is it good to leave off the computer whilst I'm learning or should I stick with Logos and forget the dead tree?

Depends on your learning style.  Would encourage memorization of Greek verses so can meditate on them.  For example, ponder verb tenses in John 1:1

Original Languages plus Scholar's Silver and above include a resource for building Greek Vocabulary so a reading plan may help.  English is not Greek.  Proper names tend to have a one to one correspondence between languages to identify a person, place, or thing.  Other words often have a different range of meaning.  The Greek vocabulary has the verb ἀκούω with meaning "I hear"; missing for this verb is a nuance with case usage.  The verb ἀκούω with accusative case means hearing with understanding (e.g. Acts 9:3) while usage with genitive case means heard sound, but not understand (e.g. Acts 9:7).

Logos has sentence diagramming, which can be helpful for reading and arranging Greek words to show flow of thought.  Also can add your own annotations.  Another option is a Personal Book (or Notes) with your own translation.

Interlinear resources have tagging.  Personally like to show manuscript form plus Louw-Nida number so can hover mouse over Louw-Nida number for a contextual range of meaning for a word (e.g. LN 24.76 in screen shot).  Likewise Thankful for Logos visual filter capabilities that can highlight words based on grammatical usage; easy to see range of verbal expression in a passage.

When striving to learn Greek language, prudent to avoid interlinear display of English Literal Translation and English Gloss in Logos.  Likewise prudent to avoid dead tree interlinear Bibles.  The danger of an interlinear is reading someone else's English translation and deceiving yourself about reading "Greek" since see Greek and English words together.  After doing your own translation, then have option to compare with others.

Greek verbal expression offers more than English.  When looking for a middle voice example, Philippians 4:8 has an imperative to consider.

Scholar's Silver and above includes "The Lexham Analytical Lexicon to the Greek New Testament" that has cognate words plus references for every Louw-Nida number.  In Greek Vocabulary, right clicked on ἀκούω, clicked headword, then clicked "The Lexham Analytical Lexicon to the Greek New Testament":

Hovering mouse over Louw-Nida numbers shows range of hearing use, including some idiomatic (e.g. whisper a secret).

Keep Smiling Smile

Posts 19637
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 20 2011 11:03 PM

Someone recently posted a PB of New Testament Words Used 50 Times or More, which could come in handy in learning Greek. Memorize these.

Stick with Logos vs. dead tree for things you aren't supposed to avoid, of course. But for things you're supposed to avoid, don't use the dead tree versions either. But there's still plenty you can do in Logos that doesn't involve looking up Greek parsings and such, which of course would detract from your learning the language. You can read your English Bible still, use commentaries, and all kinds of other books.

Posts 468
Charlene | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 20 2011 11:31 PM

Rosie Perera:

Someone recently posted a PB of New Testament Words Used 50 Times or More, which could come in handy in learning Greek. Memorize these.

Thanks, Rosie, for posting this. My Greek teacher handed out a poorly xerox copy of these words, on which we are tested every 3rd class. Now I can see the accents and breathing marks!

Charlene

Page 1 of 1 (10 items) | RSS