Resources for researching Greek and Hebrew

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Adam Rao | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 15 2013 1:18 PM

George Somsel:

I would not recommend Wallace as being your best choice.  Wallace has a tendency to give clues for how to understand the use of certain words by appealing to how you would translate it.  If you are going to rely on how you would translate a passage, you have alread made a decision regarding the form. 

George, what would you recommend instead? I've never cared for Mounce or Wallace because of their theological perspective, but I've never really looked for anything better, either. So, I'd love to hear if there are other options out there that I'm unaware of!

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Philana Crouch | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 15 2013 4:07 PM

Check out Read Greek in 30 Days or Less: New Testament, Old Testament, Apocrypha, Philo, Church Fathers. The author simplifies learning grammar. You might also check out Kairos: A Beginning Greek Grammar with Workbook and Answer Key it is in several of the base packages (Silver and above) in Logos 5.

Posts 222
Justin Cofer | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 15 2013 5:53 PM

George Somsel:

I repeat:

Never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never,       
never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never, never use an interlinear.  You will do yourself considerable harm in learning the language if you do so.

I absolutely agree.  If you want to learn Koine Greek, develop it, to read it, then don't use an interlinear.   I cannot tell you the pleasure of being able to read Koine Greek.  Interlinears (and particularly reverse interlinears) are dangerous because (1) the readers eye reads the English underneath it.  To use an illustration from Con Campbell, its like doing bicep curls without using your biceps.  Its lame and a waste of time if you want to workout your biceps.  If you are using an interlinear, you are not reading Greek.  You are reading the English translation and then looking to see what Greek word underlies the English translation. That may be helpful for the ENGLISH Bible student, but its terribly crippling to the Koine Greek NT student if he or she decides to chain themselves to an English translation.   (2)  Its dangerous because it gives the reader a false sense of security regarding his or her grasp Greek grammar.  Greek is not English.  Reverse interlinears put the Greek words in English order which means the reader -- being chained to the English translation -- never has a chance to read the Greek NT as Greek rather than as a secret code which needs to be decoded into English.  (3) It can put an unhealthy focus on the word level; -- rather than on larger units by which meaning is also communicated.  The sum is greater than the parts. In summary, interlinears should never be used by anyone desiring to be a student of the Koine Greek NT. Interlinears are dangerous. Πεπεισμαι δε ἀδελφοι μου ὁτι διαβολου ἐισιν.

 

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Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 15 2013 7:55 PM

George Somsel:

Paul DiCicco:
What is the resource I would need to add to this to use the interlinear function you refer to in your screenshot?

I repeat.  NEVER use an interlinear.  I assure you that you will regret having done so since you will forever be dependent on an existing translation.

Concur about not displaying Interlinear and Reverse Interlinear lines that mix up word order.  Only one language in a tab can be displayed that keeps linguistical context.

Thankful for Interlinear and Reverse Interlinear resources that have morphological tagging so can use visual filter highlighting:

With verbs and some more highlighted easy to "see" Greek and English correlation along with context for each language.

Wiki has =>  http://wiki.logos.com/Extended_Tips_for_Highlighting_and_Visual_Filters#Examples_of_visual_filters

Favorite Greek New Testament =>  Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament

George Somsel:
I would recommend Futato, Beginning Biblical Hebrew.

Michael Heiser has a web site companion => http://michaelsheiser.com/HWH.htm

Keep Smiling Smile

Posts 1400
Unix | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 16 2013 11:32 AM

I agree with George about interlinears - they are not useful + REALLY prohibitive for learning Gk. I agree about Wallace and Mounce, although I have Greek for the rest of us with standalone CD-ROM (my mom who studied exegetics 7 years ago borrows it to me).

Regarding grammars, I think George recommended: A Greek Grammar for Colleges:

George Somsel:
For Greek Smyth's Greek Grammar is very worthwhile.  Though it is geared toward classical Greek, it is also useful for Koine (the period of the NT).  In college I would spend several hours each night pouring over Smyth (until 3:00 am quite frequently).
Adam Rao:
George Somsel:
George, what would you recommend instead? I've never cared for Mounce or Wallace because of their theological perspective, but I've never really looked for anything better, either. So, I'd love to hear if there are other options out there that I'm unaware of!
I would not recommend Wallace as being your best choice.  Wallace has a tendency to give clues for how to understand the use of certain words by appealing to how you would translate it.  If you are going to rely on how you would translate a passage, you have alread made a decision regarding the form.

 

 


I have that, it was really cheap on pre-pub. It looks good. I would recommend it since it's good to have several beginners books to get past the novise phase:

Philana Crouch:

 

 


Regarding lexicons, see for example the discussion in: What lexicon to use with UBS Handbook set? For Lk & Acts, the best lexicon is (LSJ) but it's also among the most expensive ones. Personally I'm not going to buy BDAG - I'm going to wait for the next Edition (if it comes with the same frequency as all the previous Editions it will come in 2021).

Library ~1,500 incl.print +UBS Handbook NT
No internet. 8GB tablet~400 books. LAPTOPS 1366*768: '09 +SSD trulyergonomic.com, Winter '11/'12 8GB RAM 15.6" '13 hybr disk
Desktops: W7 3G RAM PentiumD 5,400rpm, W2000 Pradis just NIVAC Jn

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George Somsel | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 16 2013 5:01 PM

Unix living in celibacy:
Regarding lexicons, see for example the discussion in: What lexicon to use with UBS Handbook set? For Lk & Acts, the best lexicon is (LSJ) but it's also among the most expensive ones. Personally I'm not going to buy BDAG - I'm going to wait for the next Edition (if it comes with the same frequency as all the previous Editions it will come in 2021).

You may have a very long wait.  I have no particular knowledge regarding what might be in the pipeline, but it seems to have taken Danker forever to finish.

george
gfsomsel

יְמֵי־שְׁנוֹתֵינוּ בָהֶם שִׁבְעִים שָׁנָה וְאִם בִּגְבוּרֹת שְׁמוֹנִים שָׁנָה וְרָהְבָּם עָמָל וָאָוֶן

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