50 Best Christian Books Ever

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JT (alabama24) | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jun 17 2014 6:39 PM

Steve:
I think not ... tell us.

I did... In the "discussions" section, rather than in the "news" section. 

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Deacon Steve | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jun 17 2014 7:00 PM

You are way head of me ... as always ...  Someday I'll grow up.  Maybe.  Hopefully.  Tongue Tied

Thank you.

Smile

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JT (alabama24) | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jun 17 2014 7:16 PM

Steve:
You are way head of me ... as always

Uh... not so much. I am fairly inexperienced with Faithlife, especially in recent months. I didn't even know that they had "discussions," which seems like a very good addition. I wonder though if admins can remove posts / threads. I could not remove my own one (which MJ said to keep).

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Deacon Steve | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jun 17 2014 7:24 PM

It's a wonderful contribution and a great read.

Yes

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fgh | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 18 2014 6:51 AM

MJ. Smith:
Not quite the ideal forum but I've started a discussion group on faithlife https://faithlife.com/literary-reading-appropriate-for-a-christian-book-club/ intended simply to be a place to share titles we've found interesting recreational reading that we can vaguely relate to Christianity or God or religion.

I don't trust Faithlife, so I never join groups as anything more than Observer. Could you change the settings so that I can post anyway? Currently I can't even 'Like', which is the strictest settings I've seen for a group so far.

"The Christian way of life isn't so much an assignment to be performed, as a gift to be received."  Wilfrid Stinissen

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 18 2014 12:27 PM

will do later today

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 18 2014 7:31 PM

The security has been opened up ... I'd simply left the defaults.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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NB.Mick | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jul 26 2015 6:29 AM

Rosie Perera:

 I would add:

  •  
  • A Little Exercise for Young Theologians – Helmut Thielicke
  •  

Went to PrePub without anyone noticing and is - as of today - almost there!

(thanks Logos for telling on the L6 homepage)

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James Hiddle | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jul 26 2015 8:15 AM

50 best books and the Bible isn't a part of that what the deal?

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Susan Tan | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jul 26 2015 8:35 AM

There are many important Christian books but I have found the two most important books ever written after the bible to be:

Creation's Jubilee by Dr. Stephen E. Jones

Found here:

http://gods-kingdom-ministries.net/teachings/books/creations-jubilee/

Absolute Surrender by Andrew Murray....audio and book available free on ccel.org

http://www.ccel.org/ccel/murray/surrender.html

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NB.Mick | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Jul 26 2015 8:40 AM

Susan Tan:
Absolute Surrender by Andrew Murray....audio and book

for the book, check out https://www.logos.com/product/4273/absolute-surrender-and-other-addresses 

audio is under development: https://www.logos.com/product/43646/absolute-surrender

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Garrett Mercier | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 30 2017 8:04 AM

Thank you James for your post.  I was beginning to think that I was the only one thinking that no one here is championing the Bible as worthy of a Christian's read.  It is obvious, but it should be on every list anyway.  Are we actually reading God's Word, or just reading the works of those who have?  Thanks.

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David A Egolf | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 30 2017 12:20 PM

Garrett Mercier:

Thank you James for your post.  I was beginning to think that I was the only one thinking that no one here is championing the Bible as worthy of a Christian's read.  It is obvious, but it should be on every list anyway.  Are we actually reading God's Word, or just reading the works of those who have?  Thanks.

As some Christian apologists like to point out, the Bible is NOT a single book.  It is 66 books by various authors.  Thus, from the apologists viewpoint, they attest to each other. So any list of great books should probably start at 67.  Big Smile

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David Thomas | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jun 30 2017 1:28 PM

David A Egolf:
So any list of great books should probably start at 67.  Big Smile

And that is assuming the English division of books, Should 1 & 2 Kings be 1 book or two? etc. Big Smile Not to contradict my brother, but to nuance. Also noticing that this is a three-year old thread that was briefly revisited 2 years ago and has been revisited.

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Hamilton Ramos | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, May 12 2018 11:05 AM

Hi all, just came across this thread. Very interesting.

My question is: what would be the best way to make a collection of the Best Christian books ever?

1) tagging

2) manual one by one added to the collection

3) is there a rule that can be used?

The second question is:

What could be the main thrusts (christianity wise) of the majority of the books? salvation, Christlikeness, theology, holiness, spiritual growth, spiritual direction, bearing fruit?

Is there a way to find out other than reading all n keeping detailed notes?

Thanks ahead of time for any input, and hope I do not annoy anyone by reviving the thread.

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Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, May 13 2018 3:29 PM

Hamilton Ramos:

Hi all, just came across this thread. Very interesting.

My question is: what would be the best way to make a collection of the Best Christian books ever?

1) tagging

2) manual one by one added to the collection

3) is there a rule that can be used?

The second question is:

What could be the main thrusts (christianity wise) of the majority of the books? salvation, Christlikeness, theology, holiness, spiritual growth, spiritual direction, bearing fruit?

Is there a way to find out other than reading all n keeping detailed notes?

Thanks ahead of time for any input, and hope I do not annoy anyone by reviving the thread.

I would do it with tagging. Make up a single tag e.g., BestXanBooks or ChristianClassics, and apply it to the book you own that are in whatever list you're working off of (a superset of all the lists posted above in this thread, perhaps).

Then make a collection with the rule mytag:ChristianClassics

I wouldn't use such a collection for searching, but rather just to help you tick off the books you want to read someday in your lifetime. I'd tag each one as "FINISHED" once you've read it.

And each of these books is unique. I don't think there's an easy way to categorize the majority of them with "main thrusts" like what you've listed, except "spiritual growth" probably applies to most of them. The more you read of such time-honored classics, the more you'll grow as a Christian, both in understanding of Christian history and in your knowledge of and relationship with God. It would be good to read them together with others and discuss them in a book group. And/or take notes and read what others have written about them. Having a familiarity with such books will also help you as you read the vast majority of Christian literature written since then, as the best authors are well familiar with the classics and will refer to them from time to time, and you'll get more out of their books the more you know the classics.

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Hamilton Ramos | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, May 13 2018 9:50 PM

Thank you Rosie for the input.

Spiritual growth is important, but has been too generically defined without measuring results by objective evidence.

I read an article saying that after all the years of doing the same over and over, that spiritual growth is not evident in the flock of most traditions.

A deeper analysis is needed to identify the critical variables that would assure the conductive environment to high performance with respect to growth.

I will use the collection to take a closer look in that respect.

Blessings.

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, May 13 2018 11:19 PM

Hamilton, you might want to read some of the Orthodox writings on spiritual growth some of which do a good job of describing benchmarks and dangers. I don't share the concern "that spiritual growth is not evident in the flock of most traditions". It appears to me that those who seek spiritual growth, achieve it to varying degrees. Many in the flock don't seek spiritual growth but rather want the minimum effort to achieve heaven (or avoid hell). The lists provided in this thread are not necessarily intended for spiritual growth; some are, but many are more spiritual encouragement.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, May 13 2018 11:37 PM

Hamilton Ramos:

Thank you Rosie for the input.

Spiritual growth is important, but has been too generically defined without measuring results by objective evidence.

I read an article saying that after all the years of doing the same over and over, that spiritual growth is not evident in the flock of most traditions.

A deeper analysis is needed to identify the critical variables that would assure the conductive environment to high performance with respect to growth.

I will use the collection to take a closer look in that respect.

Blessings.

"measuring results"

"objective evidence"

"deeper analysis"

"critical variables"

"conducive environment"

"high performance"

These are not things I ever hear Jesus saying. These sound like a scientific or business model applied to the church, the body of Christ. Admittedly, neither he nor his disciples ever said "spiritual growth" either, but Paul came close with 1 Cor 2:6, Eph 4:11-13. There's also Heb 5:12-6:3.

Maturity in faith is one of those things like marital love that as soon as you try to measure it with precision you kill it. There are some general things one would hope that a community is growing in if they are maturing in faith: biblical literacy, for example. I suppose one could measure that by doing standardized tests across various congregations and comparing how people are doing on these over time. But...ick! I wouldn't want to be part of a church that did that. One would also hope there are more and more decisions to follow Christ and more baptisms. But apart from that (at least the baptisms are countable, but decisions can be mushy and hard to count; how committed is someone, really, when they make that decision), you can't really measure spiritual growth. It happens over years, precisely by doing the same thing over and over. That's called liturgy, and it teaches us habits of mind and heart. We grow more docile towards the things of the Lord through prayer and worship and hearing the Word read and explained, through giving and serving and getting to know and love our fellow parishioners. When you interfere in that process by trying to measure how it's going and manipulate the variables to make it turn out with "high performance" results, that is anathema to relationship with Jesus. He simply said "Come, follow me."

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Hamilton Ramos | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, May 14 2018 5:14 AM

Thank you MJ, as always good advice.

Rosie: do not get me wrong, more than derogatory criticism, I am into constructive one.

Christian worldview: very specific, many responsibilities about it, most of the flock do not even know what the word means.

A very dynamic disciple went around colleges asking:

Have you ever lied? how about taken something from work or or downloading from the internet without paying for? have you ever lusted for someone or had impure thoughts about the person, and that person not being your mate? how about cheating in school?, etc.

You can imagine the answers. If you ask the same, to the regular flock and in  all honesty, you will get similar answers with very few exceptions. Plus probably add tax paying cheating practices, unethical business practices, actual adultery, etc.

(and those exceptions are probably you, MJ, etc).

And this lack of growth has been going on for a long time *.

Objective evidence? to love God is to obey Him, and Jesus Christ gave about 257 commands. The same have been categorized in different ways and are easy to find in internet.

Before anyone says legalism take a good look at the Bible:

Rev 21:8  But as for the cowardly, the faithless, the detestable, as for murderers, the sexually immoral, sorcerers, idolaters, and all liars, their portion will be in the lake that burns with fire and sulfur, which is the second death."

There are metrics, what about indolence? apathy? etc. And in Southern more latitudes what about Chistian responsibility and stewardship? New converts to protestantism in the South (not all) seem to have this "entitlement" attitude... Does God have to come down to give them house, cars, riches, etc? are they not to plan, work, cooperate, organize?

Objective evidence?: Bible says whoever does not work, should not eat (rough paraphrase).

So we have to sit and think hard about the cause of the situation. Could it be our systems?

You being a very intelligent academic woman: which system (of the two above) would you think would be a more conductive environment to high performance in the development of Christlikeness, godliness, good bear of fruit and good stewardship?

Is a system in which you teach the sheep to sit for 40 years to listen to sermons and pay tithes what God wants as conductive environment, or is a system like the one listed to the right what the NT witnesses to and what God intended?

Are we to be prepared for all good deeds individually alone, or does God wants us to be so prepared for collective systems and institutions too?

And please remember, I am not criticising you, I am probably just frustrated that we have been 2000 so years into this and we are in a status that is a shame from very different angles.

Can and should we do something about it even if we are not formal leadership? The topic begs the question.

Kind regards.

* Even in the discovery of America and colonization, the priests, etc. came with good intentions, the explotation was mostly by the flock that conducted unethical business transactions, and politicians that isolated and confiscated land and possessions.

Fray Bartolome de las Casas went to the authorities in Spain to intercede for the aborigines, event that many believe could be taken as the forerunner of the Human Rights movement.

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