Learning Latin

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This post has 21 Replies | 6 Followers

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mab | Forum Activity | Posted: Sun, Dec 14 2014 8:24 PM

In the back of my mind, I have become a bit more curious about learning Latin. Not for heading to Rome, but I see more mixed works like Ussher and I suspect there are many more that might be more accessible if one knew some Latin.

Any suggestions on trying to at least picking up some basics for this ancient language. Inside or outside Logos. This is still a back burner item for me, but I'd like to at least get some basic skill learning on the calendar for study.

The mind of man is the mill of God, not to grind chaff, but wheat. Thomas Manton | Study hard, for the well is deep, and our brains are shallow. Richard Baxter

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George Somsel | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 15 2014 12:00 AM

You probably already have

Nunn, H. P. V. An Introduction to Ecclesiastical Latin. Cambridge: University Press, 1922.

It's not the best tool for learning Latin, but it's there.  There is also

Collins Latin Dictionary Plus Grammar

. Glasgow: HarperCollins, 1997.

which has a very basic grammar and dictionary.  Also, there is

Lewis, Charlton T., and Charles Short. Harpers’ Latin Dictionary. New York; Oxford: Harper & Brothers; Clarendon Press, 1891.

which is simply (??) a dictionary. 

george
gfsomsel

יְמֵי־שְׁנוֹתֵינוּ בָהֶם שִׁבְעִים שָׁנָה וְאִם בִּגְבוּרֹת שְׁמוֹנִים שָׁנָה וְרָהְבָּם עָמָל וָאָוֶן

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Ben Amundgaard (Faithlife) | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 15 2014 9:53 AM

mab:
Any suggestions on trying to at least picking up some basics for this ancient language. Inside or outside Logos. This is still a back burner item for me, but I'd like to at least get some basic skill learning on the calendar for study.

This is a great set for learning Latin: https://noet.com/products/36369/lingua-latina-familia-romana-collection

It's part of the Latin Classics Research Library: https://noet.com/products/47110/latin-classics-research-library

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Posts 2839
mab | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 15 2014 4:01 PM

I found Nunn in my library. The first Noet set looks good and I'll keep that in mind. Need to pay off my current load first.Thank you so much!

The mind of man is the mill of God, not to grind chaff, but wheat. Thomas Manton | Study hard, for the well is deep, and our brains are shallow. Richard Baxter

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 15 2014 4:46 PM

Ben - you are being mean to me Crying The link offers no way for me to put it on my wishlist.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 2839
mab | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 15 2014 4:58 PM

MJ. Smith:

Ben - you are being mean to me Crying The link offers no way for me to put it on my wishlist.

Save it in Pocket for now.

The mind of man is the mill of God, not to grind chaff, but wheat. Thomas Manton | Study hard, for the well is deep, and our brains are shallow. Richard Baxter

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Bruce Dunning | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 15 2014 7:42 PM

This is the resource that I have been slowly working my way through. - https://www.logos.com/product/34080/introduction-to-latin-collection

Using adventure and community to challenge young people to continually say "yes" to God

Posts 2839
mab | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 15 2014 8:18 PM

Bruce Dunning:

This is the resource that I have been slowly working my way through. - https://www.logos.com/product/34080/introduction-to-latin-collection

That looks good, Bruce. Right on my wishlist and very affordable.Thanks!

The mind of man is the mill of God, not to grind chaff, but wheat. Thomas Manton | Study hard, for the well is deep, and our brains are shallow. Richard Baxter

Posts 792
James Hiddle | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 15 2014 8:24 PM

Bruce Dunning:

This is the resource that I have been slowly working my way through. - https://www.logos.com/product/34080/introduction-to-latin-collection

Thanks for the resource.

God Bless you always my Brother in Christ!

James

Posts 5321
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 15 2014 9:21 PM

New Steps in Latin Collection (3 vols.) This is a far cheaper option albeit probably not as good as the one Ben mentioned.

-Dan

Posts 2839
mab | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 15 2014 10:07 PM

The focus seems to vary. The Latin used in the Vulgate, Church Fathers, Classical writers, seems to differ from what I can tell so far. Not necessarily one better than the other, just different. Hopefully it's more on the vocabulary side of things that they differ. 

The mind of man is the mill of God, not to grind chaff, but wheat. Thomas Manton | Study hard, for the well is deep, and our brains are shallow. Richard Baxter

Posts 5321
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Dec 15 2014 10:37 PM

I do not read latin only occasionally decipher it. It has for english readers a very unusual grammar... I did purchase the above set but have yet to dive into it... It's approach seemed to be the best for my desires.

-Dan

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Graham Criddle | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 16 2014 12:22 AM

MJ. Smith:

Ben - you are being mean to me Crying The link offers no way for me to put it on my wishlist.

You should be able to add it to a wish list from https://www.logos.com/product/36369/lingua-latina-familia-romana-collection 

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Jan Krohn | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 16 2014 1:27 AM

I took Latin classes for 6 years at high school a long time ago. I wish I could remember a bit more of it...

The fact that there's a difference between classical Latin and ecclesiastical Latin is very much true. The vocabulary and grammar both overlap of course, but the choice of words and grammatical constructs to use, and above all the writing style is different.

The first year text book we used back then was focused on classical Latin. Most classical writers used to have a lot of images in their text, and put a lot of effort to have a stylish text flow. I would even say, especially the poets, valued the text flow (number and length of syllables etc) above the content.

Ecclesiastical Latin on the other hand is pragmatic. The writers cared about their readers, and wanted them to understand the content easily. They avoided complex constructs. Ecclesiastical Latin is easier to understand, but not as nice to read.

I did prefer ecclesiastical Latin (after all I'm male ;-)

Looking back to that time now, 20 years later, the classical poets (Ovid, Aesop, Petronius...) left a more lasting memory and impression on me.

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Bruce Dunning | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 16 2014 4:17 AM

mab:

Bruce Dunning:

This is the resource that I have been slowly working my way through. - https://www.logos.com/product/34080/introduction-to-latin-collection

That looks good, Bruce. Right on my wishlist and very affordable.Thanks!

For those same reasons I ended up choosing this resource.

Using adventure and community to challenge young people to continually say "yes" to God

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Bruce Dunning | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 16 2014 4:19 AM

Also, since we are on the topic of learning Latin some of you might be interested in a thread that I started about learning Latin vocabulary - https://community.logos.com/forums/t/96832.aspx

Using adventure and community to challenge young people to continually say "yes" to God

Posts 98
Rick Carmickle | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 16 2014 6:21 PM

If you want help learning Latin, try:

The Teaching Company: http://www.thegreatcourses.com/courses/latin-101-learning-a-classical-language.html

Or Latin Via Ovid: http://www.amazon.com/Latin-Via-Ovid-Course-Edition/dp/0814317324 with accompanying CDs.

You would want to learn basic grammar and proper pronunciation as well and this will help.

Posts 2839
mab | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 16 2014 7:58 PM

Lots of great replies. Going to churn this through and make a decision. I'm getting a head start for the new year which means putting all my study intentions on the calendar.

The mind of man is the mill of God, not to grind chaff, but wheat. Thomas Manton | Study hard, for the well is deep, and our brains are shallow. Richard Baxter

Posts 5909
SineNomine | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Dec 17 2014 6:11 AM

For a systematic study of classical Latin, nothing beats Wheelock's Latin, now in its 7th edition (although the 6th edition revised works just fine).

For ecclesiastical Latin, the most common text in Catholic universities and seminaries that teach Latin is Collins' Primer of Ecclesiastical Latin.

Unfortunately, Faithlife has neither in its collection thus far. Because they are both (comparatively) very popular, there are online resources for them.

If you want a lousy experience of learning classical Latin that will be just about useless for reading real texts, I heartily recommend the Cambridge Latin series.

I have used all three of the above options. If you'd like the opinions of a well-regarded Catholic layman (and canon law professor) whose professional work relies heavily on Latin, click here.

Please use descriptive thread titles to attract helpful posts & not waste others' time. Thanks!

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Ben Amundgaard (Faithlife) | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Dec 17 2014 9:36 AM

SineNomine:
Wheelock's Latin

I would really like us to get Wheelock's!

SineNomine:
Collins' Primer of Ecclesiastical Latin.

I'm going to add this to my list (if it's not already there).

If I remember correctly (and it's been a while), doesn't Wheelock's offer guidance on Ecclesiastical Latin as well as Classical Latin (I may just be remembering that they go over differences in pronunciation ...)?

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