What is difference between WBC Revised edition and 2nd edition

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Mark | Forum Activity | Posted: Tue, Sep 1 2015 11:56 PM

In the Zondervan sale, dynamic pricing is setting a $9.99 price for WBC vol 24 and 25 second editions.  I already own an edition by the same author, same WBC series, same vol that is listed as a revised edition.  What is the difference?  Seems like Zondervan wants me to pay about $20 to receive something I already have.

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Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 2 2015 12:04 AM

You need to look at (1) dates of publication; (2) whether the authors have changed (which happens in some cases); (3) how the number of pages has changed (as an indication of new material). Using look inside (including that of amazon.com) you can get a sense of which sections have been most expanded. (4) You can also google for reviews of these volumes' latest edition, which will normally point out what is new.

Posts 2206
Mark | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 2 2015 1:20 AM

Thanks Francis.  It appears as if the Revised editions are from 2005 and the 2nd editions from 2004.  This now explains the reason why the Zondervan sales price is so cheap.

Posts 3771
Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 2 2015 2:54 AM

You may conclude that it is not worth for you to upgrade these particular volumes, and I cannot speak to that because, although I own them, I have not looked specifically at the differences between their different editions nor have the time to do it now. What I can say, however, is that the volume on Joshua, for instance, is substantially updated and expanded and goes by the same sale price. What I am saying is that the cheap sale price is not a reflection of the relative quality and value of individual volumes. In fact, it costs as much for someone to get one of these volumes for the first time as it does for you to get a second edition, although for the other person it is a 100% gain.

Posts 245
Alexxy Olu | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 2 2015 2:56 AM

Thanks for this timely information.

I was just pondering the same question before deciding what to do.

Posts 3771
Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 2 2015 3:14 AM

It can also be a good buying strategy to get second editions when they are at a price that is cheap and unlikely to occur again (or very rarely so), because, if in the future new or updated volumes come out, your dynamic price on the whole collection would have become lower. 

Posts 2206
Mark | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 2 2015 4:06 AM

Francis:
You may conclude that it is not worth for you to upgrade these particular volumes,

I understand what you are saying and agree that it may be worth it for someone else. But this is not an upgrade.  It is a downgrade. Same author, but the revised edition is the upgrade as it was published a year after the 2nd edition.

As far as dynamic pricing in the future goes, as far as I am aware (and I may be wrong), but Zondervan is allowing dynamic pricing for the month of September only.  I would be thrilled to learn that I am wrong.  But that is my understanding.

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JT (alabama24) | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 2 2015 4:53 AM

Your understanding is correct Mark. 

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Whyndell Grizzard | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 2 2015 5:51 AM

I reviewed my WBC series- have several revised volumes and several 2nd editions- my total number in WBC is 67 volumes. So even at 9.99 I still glad I took the deal.

Posts 352
Cynthia Tucker | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 2 2015 7:00 AM

So I purchased the entire WBC set. Do I have all the most recently published books or not?

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Jack Caviness | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 2 2015 8:58 AM

Cynthia Tucker:
Do I have all the most recently published books or not?

You do. At least that is what FL reported in another thread.

Posts 2279
Andy | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 2 2015 12:08 PM

Cynthia Tucker:

So I purchased the entire WBC set. Do I have all the most recently published books or not?

Hi Cynthia,

I think that this is the post to which Jack refers,

https://community.logos.com/forums/p/114932/760515.aspx#760515

Blessings,

Posts 352
Cynthia Tucker | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 2 2015 12:16 PM

Andy:

I think that this is the post to which Jack refers,

https://community.logos.com/forums/p/114932/760515.aspx#760515

Awesome! Thanks guys. Glad to know I have the current editions.

Author of the Chronological Word Truth Life Bible Series

WordTruthLifeBible.com

Posts 2780
Erwin Stull, Sr. | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Sep 2 2015 11:48 PM

I had the original 59 volume set and was blessed (by my son) to get the 62 volume upgrade during this special sale. Just missing 3 older volumes now (19, 24, 25) which are not that important since the material is covered in the newer editions. To top that off, the Logos bonus is in fact a bonus. Thank you Logos and Zondervan. I can not even think about the other sale packages, however, I am grateful, happy and blessed to receive what I have to continue and enhance my studies. Big Smile

Posts 1586
John Kight | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Sep 3 2015 11:20 AM

From the preface of the revised edition of Isaiah: 

"The opportunity to issue a revised edition of this commentary allowed me to make necessary changes and to bring the work up to date by adding recognition of new literature.

The essential recognition of the poetic and dramatic nature of Isaiah remains. But much about the way the commentary structures the material is different. The first edition’s use of generations of kings to chronologically arrange all sixty-six chapters went beyond the book’s historical references and did not achieve the unity for the book that I had hoped.

Instead, this edition uses insights that have emerged from more recent published studies to present a new literary view of the book. The literary integrity of the different acts (Isa 5:1–12:613:1–27:1328:1–33:2434:1–49:4;49:5–54:17b54:17c–61:11) is central to my understanding of the whole book. Chaps. 1–4 and 62–66 are seen as an envelope for the book.

My special thanks go to James W. Watts, who has edited the work, brought order out of chaos, and made my argument much more readable and understandable. Melanie McQuere has done her usual thorough work in copyediting."

For book reviews and more visit sojotheo.com 

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John Kight | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Sep 3 2015 11:22 AM

From the preface of the revised edition of Psalms 1-50:

"The premature death of Peter Craigie in September 1985 deprived biblical interpretation of a fine scholar in the prime of his working career (he was forty-eight on August 18, 1985). Before his death he had written seven books and more than forty articles, and he was well on the way to writing the commentary on Jeremiah in the Word Biblical Commentary. In the preface to the book published in his honor after his death, Lyle Eslinger and Glen Taylor, the editors, describe Craigie as a “tall dignified Scots-Canadian whose warm spirit and charming humour functioned in tandem with a quiet yet confident Christian faith.” He was known for his integrity and his courteous responses to students, religious groups, church ministers, and fellow professional scholars (see Ascribe to the Lord: Biblical and Other Studies in Memory of Peter C. Craigie, JSOT SS 67 [Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1988]). His former students considered him to be a master teacher.

Craigie’s commentary on Pss 1–50 was written very quickly, a product of his knowledge and efficiency in research. In this first volume published of the Word Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament, he refined the format set by the editors for these commentaries. In the author’s preface to this volume, he says that he had sought to find a “middle path” between the “surfeit of knowledge” about the Psalms and his objective of maintaining their vitality while “trying to clarify the meaning of each psalm in the modern world.” When he was writing the commentary, I remember being deeply impressed, and somewhat intimidated, by his ability to write so well so quickly.

The quality of his work in the commentary is demonstrated by the fact that twenty-one years after its publication it is still in print, respected and well received. In the preface of the commentary, Craigie lamented his inability to thank “an old friend,” Mitchell Dahood, who died on March 8, 1982. One of the especially valuable aspects of his commentary is his interaction with the multitude of proposals for reading made by Dahood in his three-volume Anchor Bible commentary on the Psalms. In 1990 in the preface to my commentary on Pss 51–100 I wrote of continual recourse to Dahood’s work, commenting that while we very frequently reject his readings, he forces us to justify our own even if we repudiate his. The freshness and audacity of Dahood’s proposals have faded in the past few years, but he belongs to the roster of “premier gadflies” in the study of Hebrew poetry. Craigie’s engagement with his work is still useful.

In the preface of my commentary, I admitted that I had been for some years a “missing tooth” between the work of Peter Craigie and that of Leslie Allen (Psalms 101–50WBC 21), having “crawled along” behind their two volumes already in print. I have still crawled along, this time behind the revision of Leslie Allen, published in 2002. The revision of Craigie’s commentary follows a different pattern from that of Allen’s, who revised his own work. In the beginning, there was uncertainty about the nature of the revision. In the first place, I had considerable trepidation about revising Craigie’s work, fearing that I would damage its quality. Also, I worked for some months on the assumption that the publisher and editors wanted a full revision of each Psalm—essentially, a new commentary. The matter was subsequently clarified so that Craigie’s work would be left unchanged with an extensive supplement added at the end of Craigie’s commentary (as has been done in some other volumes of the Word Biblical Commentary). Illness, surgeries, other responsibilities, and my normal snail-like pace slowed the process. I am grateful to the publisher and to John D. W. Watts, the editor, for their patience and support. Joel F. Drinkard and Peter J. Gentry, two colleagues of mine at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, have helped with this project through their friendship, lending me books, their counsel, and other assistance. All of my work in the Word Biblical Commentaries has been helped by the editorial work of Melanie McQuere. She has often improved the text and saved me from many errors.

For the completion of this project, I owe a great debt of gratitude to W. Dennis Tucker, Jr., a former student of mine. He has been a constant associate in the preparation of the supplement, having written the section on recent developments in the exegesis of the Psalter. He has also prepared the bibliography, assisted by his students at Ouachita Baptist University in Arkadelphia, Arkansas, and at Truett Theological Seminary of Baylor University in Waco, Texas, where he now teaches. He has contributed liberally out of his busy schedule of teaching, writing, and family life to help me get the work done. Since Peter Craigie was an excellent teacher, who expended great efforts to guide and encourage his students, I think that he would be pleased to have a young scholar working on this supplement.

The supplement consists of three sections, with a few excursuses and extended notes interspersed, and an updated bibliography. The first section deals with some of the developments in the understanding and analysis of Hebrew poetry. The second section, written by Dennis Tucker, surveys some recent contributions to the exegesis and interpretation of the Psalms. The third section attempts to bring together contemporary work on the nature of the Psalter and the arrangement of psalms in it. The fourth section provides a selected and updated bibliography for the overall study of the book of Psalms and an updated bibliography for each of Pss 1–50. Relevant bibliographies are attached to each of the three main sections, plus some other bibliography pertinent for the excursuses and notes and attached to them. The bibliographies are not exhaustive, but their size and scope indicate the extensive nature of Psalm study in recent years.

Readers may be somewhat perplexed, and understandably so, by the lack of a section dealing with the theology of the Psalms. However, most of the theological work on the Psalms in recent years has been done in monographs and special studies, and more are on the way. Dennis Tucker reviews some of the most important of these in the section on the exegesis of the Psalms, and some others appear in other sections. The books of Hans-Joachim Kraus (Theology of the Psalms, trans. K. Crim [Minneapolis: Augsburg, 1986]; originally published as Theologie der Psalmen[Neukirchen-Vluyn: Neukirchener Verlag, 1979]) and Hermann Spieckermann (Heilsgegenwart: Eine Theologie der Psalmem, FRLANT[Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1988]) are still the basic works. Unfortunately, Spieckermann is not available in English. Also, recent commentaries contain the treatments (extended in some cases) of varied theological subjects, notably the commentaries of Mays, McCann, Hossfeld and Zenger, Schaefer, Terrien, and Wilson. Perhaps the time is near for a theology of the Psalter that considers the theological significance of groups of psalms in their canonical order. Such a work is not yet visible on my horizon, but even now one or more may be underway somewhere in the world of Psalm study.

All of us who read and study the Psalms are in debt to a long, long line of scholars, whose labors are our heritage. How much better it is to have a “surfeit of knowledge” about the Psalms than to be confronted by the heap of words, colons, lines, and verses in the Psalter with no guidance from others. We are thankful that many laborers have worked in this vineyard before us, with room for more. The harvest is not finished."

For book reviews and more visit sojotheo.com 

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John Kight | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Sep 3 2015 11:25 AM

From the preface of the revised edition 2 Corinthians:

"Since the present volume first appeared in 1986, it is obviously in need of a makeover. This is the task of the reviser, who happily is the same person as the one who prepared the first edition. Yet right at the outset of this enterprise, I became aware that the job could not be undertaken in any worthy fashion without help, both divine and human.

The first source of help is mentioned in no perfunctory way since, for an octogenarian, every day and every opportunity are a gift from above. I gladly pay this acknowledgment.

Human assistance has come to me in several ways. Let me, like Marcus Aurelius, reckon up my debts. And in this, as the title page will show, I express my gratitude to a cohort of willing helpers. First on the list is Dr. Carl N. Toney, who has found no assignment too much but, cheerfully, expertly, and with amazing alacrity, has fashioned the first draft into something readable and far richer than I could have made it. He is the coordinator of the revision as well as the author of the final version of the sections on rhetorical criticism, the composition of the epistle, and the resurrection in 2 Corinthians. Doctoral candidate Mark W. Linder has contributed the section on the social setting of 2 Corinthians. A thirdmember of the team is Dr. David J. Downs, now teaching at Fuller Theological Seminary, who has consented to summarize his dissertation to produce a section on the collection in 2 Corinthians as a harbinger of his published work. Mention should also be made of former student Dr. Benjamin Schliesser, who helped to unravel some turgid German expressions. I am in their debt along with the associate editor, Dr. Lynn A. Losie, and copy editor Melanie McQuere.

A word of explanation is called for as to the format to be followed. The text of the earlier commentary has been worked over to correct a few slips; to update some of the abbreviations, such as BDAG; and to change the punctuation to ensure a smoother reading. The first attempt of writing the commentary took me nearly a decade to prepare, and, on review, I am not inclined to meddle with the text. Further reflections, however, have given me and my fellow helpers a chance to look at the Pauline letter again. The fruit of this review has been to add these additional notes and supply the new bibliography with occasional comments and annotations. Several excursuses have been added to enrich the present volume.

This revision is an attempt to make our study of Paul’s challenging—and in some respects enigmatic—letter more serviceable. If this effort has in any way been successful, it is to the credit of my helpers, as indicated, and to the opportunities provided by extended visits to the libraries at Fuller and the Claremont School of Theology as well as the Dr. Williams’s Library, London, Tyndale House, Cambridge, and the International European Baptist Seminary, Prague, and finally by the secretarial assistance at Azusa Pacific University, Haggard Graduate School of Theology, courtesy of Barbara Hayes."

For book reviews and more visit sojotheo.com 

Posts 948
Lew Worthington | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Sep 3 2015 1:58 PM

Thanks, John. That's helpful.

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GaoLu | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Sep 4 2015 4:26 PM

I'm still trying to figure out how 5 books (2 new, 3 updates)  X $9.99 = $53.63.  Do I get a mystery book thrown in?  Or maybe I get 10% back in Logos credit and that accounts for it?  Numbers are still off.  

Posts 948
Lew Worthington | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Sep 4 2015 6:32 PM

Gao Lu:

I'm still trying to figure out how 5 books (2 new, 3 updates)  X $9.99 = $53.63.  Do I get a mystery book thrown in?  Or maybe I get 10% back in Logos credit and that accounts for it?  Numbers are still off.  

You've got it as indicated here and in a couple other recent posts. Doing the math then means that doing the remainder of the set (with dynamic pricing, etc.) means you'll end up paying about 9.65 per volume. ((53.63*.9)/5)

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