Pastors reading fiction - ala Vyrso

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Bruce Dunning | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Nov 14 2015 2:29 PM

Thanks Floyd for bringing this to our attention. I have a confession to make. I do a lot of reading but I don't read much fiction. That being said, I know it is good for me so I "force myself" to do so and some of my reasons are articulated in the blog you highlighted.

But I'm quite picky at what I read and only will read what comes highly recommended from people I trust. Actually I'd be interested in hearing from people on this forum what they think are the best fiction books they have read and why they would recommend that book. If Faithlife carries them that would even be better.

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Mark Barnes | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Nov 14 2015 2:36 PM

I don't think I've ever read a single example of literary fiction that I've enjoyed or found helpful (unless 1984 and Animal Farm counts). On the other hand, I quite enjoy adventures by authors like Tolkien, J. K. Rowling, John le Carré and Robert Harris. 

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Nov 14 2015 3:14 PM

Mark Barnes:
I don't think I've ever read a single example of literary fiction that I've enjoyed or found helpful

I'm on the opposite side of the fence e.g. Class Trip by Emmanuel Carrere makes one consider the plight of a criminal's son; The Old Gringo by Carlos Fuentes covers the clash of cultures, The Three-Arched Bridge by Ismael Kadare on the border between Muslim and Christian cultures, ...

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mab | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Nov 14 2015 6:45 PM

I used to read fiction growing up, but I've been so overwhelmingly swamped after college trying to keep up and learning multiple disciplines that It's been in the attic. Now that I'm on Logos, I've got a single priority.

I should still cut out a leisure read time bracket for fiction and I could fire up some of the gems I've gathered in Noet. 

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Kenute P. Curry | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Nov 14 2015 8:10 PM

Would love to see:

C. S. Lewis "The Chronicles of Narnia" 

J. R Tolkien "The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings Trilogy"

Robert Jordan "The Wheel of Time Series-15 Volumes"

either on LOGOS, NOET, or VYRSO.

Have noted that LOGOS already as C. S. Lewis "The Space Trilogy (Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, That Hideous Strength)."

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Floyd Johnson | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Nov 14 2015 8:58 PM

One more reason, though parallel to those listed here, is that it may help us understand our parishioners.  Whether it is Christian fiction or not, the fiction of the culture often reflects what it is or what it is becoming.  Knowing either  of these  allows us to better prepare  our people for the challenges they may face.

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Floyd

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Jan Krohn | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Nov 15 2015 1:58 AM

Some more recommendations, Christian and secular mix

* C.S. Lewis Space trilogy

* Ben Hur

* Dr Heiser's Façade and Portent

* Day of the Triffids

* Pilgrim's Progress

* Hamlet

* Sherlock Holmes

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HansK | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Nov 15 2015 4:23 AM

Jan Krohn:

Some more recommendations, Christian and secular mix

Dr Heiser's Façade and Portent

Mike's books are on Vyrso :-)

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GregW | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Nov 15 2015 5:00 AM

Mark Barnes:

I don't think I've ever read a single example of literary fiction that I've enjoyed or found helpful (unless 1984 and Animal Farm counts). On the other hand, I quite enjoy adventures by authors like Tolkien, J. K. Rowling, John le Carré and Robert Harris. 

I think you're probably displaying your "Britishness" there Mark - my list would be almost the same, although I'd probably add some of G K Chesterton's work and I've particularly enjoyed some of le Carre's later "angry" novels (the Constant Gardener, Absolute Friends, the Mission Song) having been thoroughly put off literary fiction at school over 40 years ago by being force-fed Graham Greene and Shakespeare.


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Kenute P. Curry | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Nov 15 2015 6:13 AM

Jan Krohn C. S. Lewis "Space Trilogy (Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, That Hideous Strength)" and the "Pilgrim's Progress" is already on LOGOS, so those you can buy.

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EastTN | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 16 2015 5:36 AM

GregW:

...having been thoroughly put off literary fiction at school over 40 years ago by being force-fed ... Shakespeare.

One reason that many people have been put off Shakespeare is that the way his plays are taught in the average high school is terrible.  They are not literature intended to be read, but plays intended for live performance.  When English teachers try to analyze them the way they would a novel, they quickly become incredibly boring.

If you were willing to give him another chance, I would suggest going to a live professional performance of one of his comedies.  (Or, for the low budget option, rent a copy of Kenneth Branagh's movie version of Much Ado About Nothing).  This is not "literary fiction" - it's pure silliness distilled down and channeled on the stage through men in doublets and tights.  His tragedies are more serious, of course, but it's the same basic deal.  They come alive on stage in a way that they simply don't on the page. (But I would still start with a comedy; in my judgment, they're more accessible.)  Treating Shakespeare as literature instead of theatre is a bit like asking a teenager to read old Seinfeld scripts and "get it" without ever seeing the show.

As an aside, you might think the language would be a barrier.  It really isn't.  Actors who specialize in Shakespeare learn a host of little tricks with gestures and body language to help the audience follow what's going on.  Done by professionals, it works remarkably well.

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Floyd Johnson | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 16 2015 11:11 AM

&

EastTN:
If you were willing to give him another chance, I would suggest going to a live professional performance of one of his comedies.  (Or, for the low budget option, rent a copy of Kenneth Branagh's movie version of Much Ado About Nothing).  This is not "literary fiction" - it's pure silliness distilled down and channeled on the stage through men in doublets and tights.  His tragedies are more serious, of course, but it's the same basic deal.  They come alive on stage in a way that they simply don't on the page. (But I would still start with a comedy; in my judgment, they're more accessible.)  Treating Shakespeare as literature instead of theatre is a bit like asking a teenager to read old Seinfeld scripts and "get it" without ever seeing the show.

I agree - high school left me feeling indifferent to the Bard. Three or four years later, my college brought in a professional troupe.  In the afternoon they did a free performance of Midsummer's Night Dream in the campus' grassy quad  and I was hooked. That evening they gave a ticketed performance in our campus' little theater. Both were well done and left me, still 45 years later, looking forward to watching Shakespeare  whenever I am able.

Blessings,
Floyd

Pastor-Patrick.blogspot.com

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