TIP of the day: Learning/reviewing Greek like a modern old fogey

Page 1 of 2 (22 items) 1 2 Next >
This post has 21 Replies | 1 Follower

Posts 26467
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Posted: Fri, Feb 12 2016 12:17 AM

You may have noted that I lean towards George's opinion of interlinears when over-used as a crutch. However, I am a fan of aids to help the mid-level language student to read, read, read and read. "Max 'n Mary" and the Readers view provide a very nice environment for reading.

1. Here is the basic layout - a bare bones Greek interlinear on the left and "Max 'n Mary" on the right. More specifically:

  • Nestle, Eberhard, Erwin Nestle, Barbara Aland, Kurt Aland, Johannes Karavidopoulos, Carlo M. Martini, and Bruce M. Metzger. The Greek New Testament with McReynolds English Interlinear. 27th ed. Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft, 1993.
  • Zerwick, Max, and Mary Grosvenor. A Grammatical Analysis of the Greek New Testament. Rome: Biblical Institute Press, 1974.

2. First set up the multi-view panel.

3. Then set the interlinear to Reader's edition format. You can even use the same 60 occurrences limit.

4. Note you get a full right-click Context Menu on the interlinear.

5. You get a significant Context Menu from the grammatical analysis side.

6. And one can modernize the layout by adding propositional outlines (speaker icons, ...

From the Logos blog:

Zerwick’s Grammatical Analysis of the Greek New Testament

| Wed, April 28, 2010

Many who use A Grammatical Analysis of the Greek New Testament in print affectionately refer to it as “Max & Mary” after the author and translator/reviser, Max Zerwick and Mary Grosvenor. The affection is for good reason, “Max & Mary” offer a helpful and informed analysis of the grammar of the Greek New Testament. And they do it in a commentary format, so the Logos Bible Software version (which you already have if you have the Portfolio LE edition of Logos) scrolls synchronously with your text — English (reverse interlinear? yes!), Greek, or whatever other New Testament edition you have.
I’ll be honest: I haven’t used this book much; it seems I have so many other tools available! But I’ve learned that I’m the one who has been missing out. Why? First, some minor points:

  1. There is a great little “Glossary of Grammatical Terms” included in the front matter.
  2. There are links throughout, by section number, to Zerwick’s Biblical Greek, Illustrated by Examples (included in the Introduction to Biblical Greek Collection)

I’ll use 1Ti 2.3-7 as an example of the kind of stuff that “Max & Mary” offer, listing the Greek text (NA27) with the Lexham English Bible translation interspersed. I’ve also highlighted in bold all of the terms that are mentioned. The analysis will follow for each verse, broken out with one item per line.

3 τοῦτο καλὸν καὶ ἀπόδεκτον ἐνώπιον τοῦ σωτῆρος ἡμῶν θεοῦ,
3 This is good and acceptable before God our Savior,

3 ἀπόδεκτος (< ἀποδέχομαι welcome) welcome, pleasing.
σωτήρ 1:1

4 ὃς πάντας ἀνθρώπους θέλει σωθῆναι καὶ εἰς ἐπίγνωσιν ἀληθείας ἐλθεῖν.
4 who wants all people to be saved and to come to a knowledge of the truth.

4 σωθῆναι aor. inf. pass. σῴζω.
ἐπί-γνωσις knowledge.
ἐλθεῖν aor2 inf. ἔρχομαι.

5 Εἷς γὰρ θεός, εἷς καὶ μεσίτης θεοῦ καὶ ἀνθρώπων, ἄνθρωπος Χριστὸς Ἰησοῦς,
5 For there is one God and one mediator between God and human beings, the man Christ Jesus,

5 εἷς…θεός there is one God.
μεσίτης mediator.

6 δοὺς ἑαυτὸν ἀντίλυτρον ὑπὲρ πάντων, τὸ μαρτύριον καιροῖς ἰδίοις.
6 who gave himself a ransom for all, the testimony at the proper time,

6 δούς aor2 ptc δίδωμι.
ἀντί-λυτρον ransom.
μαρτύριον evidence, testimony, i.e. to what has just been stated (v.4).
καιροῖς ἰδίοις at the proper time (time ordained by God).

7 εἰς ὃ ἐτέθην ἐγὼ κῆρυξ καὶ ἀπόστολος, ἀλήθειαν λέγω οὐ ψεύδομαι, διδάσκαλος ἐθνῶν ἐν πίστει καὶ ἀληθείᾳ.
7 for which I was appointed a herald and an apostle—I am speaking the truth, I am not lyinga teacher of the Gentiles in faith and truth.

7 εἰς ὅ to/for which.
ἐ-τέθην I was made, aor. pass. τίθημι appoint.
κῆρυξ -υκος ὁ herald, preacher.
ψεύδομαι lie, tell an untruth.
διδάσκαλος teacher.

Max Zerwick and Mary Grosvenor, A Grammatical Analysis of the Greek New Testament (Rome: Biblical Institute Press, 1974-), 629.

The analysis is rather compact and brief, but it gives helpful information, including potentially difficult bits of parsing/declension and glosses. These can help when reading or when thinking through a passage. Also helpful is the separation of prefix (typically prepositional) and root; this can help one recognize a word that might otherwise be unfamiliar. Lastly, they give some help for irregular forms (e.g. κῆρυξ -υκος ὁ in v. 7).
Max & Mary don’t just do this for a book of the NT, or a particular author; they do it for the whole Greek New Testament. That means that anywhere you go in the New Testament—any passage you’re studying—you can get some help from Max & Mary.
While I am impressed with the helpful analysis, I think I’m most impressed by a few paragraphs in the preface (quoted below in their entirety) that discuss the reason the work exists, and the people it is intended to help:

But most important of all is the purpose to be served. It is hoped that this English revised edition in its turn will mean that the Greek text of the New Testament will not remain exclusively a tool on the desks of a decreasing number of specialists but will become a living power in the hands of theologians, of preachers of the Word, of directors of Bible discussion-circles, and finally in the hands of those who pray in private from the Word of God. This is the purpose to be served. May God bless everyone helping it.

The student who has little knowledge of Greek should bear in mind while using this book that it is by no means necessary to understand immediately everything explained in it. The principle of one thing at a time will serve him well. Many of the linguistic subtleties go beyond the needs of the beginner and are intended for the more advanced student, interested perhaps in the characteristics of Hellenistic Greek as contrasted with classical Greek.

A helpful feature of this work (and a justification of its size) is the fact that a student can begin using it at whatever point he likes, each chapter being self-sufficient and not presupposing explanations given in the previous chapters.

Max Zerwick and Mary Grosvenor, A Grammatical Analysis of the Greek New Testament (Rome: Biblical Institute Press, 1974-), iii–iv.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 3672
Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 2:55 AM

The only addition to this I would add is that your tip depends on functionality that is only available in Logos Now. However, those who cannot display in the same window can still link the Greek NT with Zerwick. A useful layout could also include Zerwick's grammar in a corner or behind the front windows as he refers to it from time to time in his verse-by-verse explanations. The latter include links to the relevant sections in the former. 

Posts 1418
Forum MVP
Veli Voipio | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 5:30 AM

I started to use this feature right away when it came available, and now they have also fixed a minor bug on the Hebrew side. 

I haven't kept the interlinear text visible in my Greek reading but now I can occasionally check whether the text contains rare words.

Gold package, and original language material and ancient text material, SIL and UBS books, discourse Hebrew OT and Greek NT. PC with Windows 8.1

Posts 99
Zak Metz | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 8:19 AM

I'm a new Greek student, and this setup looked really useful. Then I discovered that (even though I'm on Platinum with the large Greek bundle) I don't have NA27 (I know I'm whining). I suspect I'll need it for school, but is there any reason I might go with the cheaper Lexham interlinear, or is this a case where you get what you pay for, and you need the real deal, a la BDAG/HALOT?

Posts 3672
Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 8:34 AM

You should be able to use any Greek New Testament you have. If you don't have it already, the SBL one is free. 

Posts 99
Zak Metz | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 9:27 AM

It's the Greek interlinear that I lack. I'm interested in the Reader's Edition view as MJ shows.

Posts 588
Bill Shewmaker | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 9:40 AM

Great post MJ. Is there an equivalent layout for the OT?

Posts 26467
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 1:05 PM

Francis:
. A useful layout could also include Zerwick's grammar in a corner

A good idea.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 26467
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 1:06 PM

Bill Shewmaker:
Is there an equivalent layout for the OT?

I don't know - I'll look for something equivalent to Zerwick.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 26467
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 1:12 PM

Zak Metz:
, but is there any reason I might go with the cheaper Lexham interlinear,

For reading, I'm sure the Lexham is fine. The real question is what your school requires.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 26467
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 6:04 PM

The closest Hebrew equivalent I can find for Hebrew is Analytical Key to the Old Testament (4 vols.) by Owens, John Joseph which, unfortunately, is not in my library to check. I guess we need a Hebrew scholar to step in with an equivalent resource for the layout.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 3672
Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2016 11:22 PM

The OT often does not have equivalent resources for two reasons: (1) Generally, the OT has been neglected in comparison to the NT. There are still many more NT than OT scholars in the academia today. (2) The size of the OT is so much greater than that of the NT that something equivalent to Zerwick would be considered a very daunting task (it was even for the whole NT!). 

I had researched this in the past and the closest I have found is also partial: the Baylor handbook series (https://www.logos.com/product/37360/baylor-handbook-series) which only has very few volumes published to date and only five in the OT in Logos, four of which are shorter books, and two of these the classic classroom easier books to translate (Ruth and Jonah). There are two additional volumes (Genesis part II, Esther) published but not available in Logos yet. BTW this series is also worth considering for the NT where there are many more books covered. It is pricier to get than Zerwick but more detailed. 

Depending on how many good grammars someone has, the grammars section of the exegetical guide can be handy if linked to the OT text, since it would list any grammatical discussion in which the passage is listed.

The NET Bible notes (which is a resource in its own right) can be also linked as a window and it does offer some interesting comments on the underlying Hebrew/Aramaic/Greek text. 

There are other steps that can provide similar information to what Zerwick does but they are not just panels you can link. For instance one can consult the translational notes of exegetical commentaries (e.g., the notes sections in WBC). Another one that can be handy is to make one's lexica into a collection and search for one's passage in them. It allows one to locate specific usages connected to the passage within lexica. 

Posts 2851
Sascha John | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 13 2016 1:27 AM

what if you don't have Max & Mary

Posts 588
Bill Shewmaker | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 13 2016 9:58 AM

MJ. Smith:

The closest Hebrew equivalent I can find for Hebrew is Analytical Key to the Old Testament (4 vols.) by Owens, John Joseph which, unfortunately, is not in my library to check. I guess we need a Hebrew scholar to step in with an equivalent resource for the layout.

Thank You MJ...I have those resources and shall try it out.

Edit: At first glance this looks encouraging... I linked the interlinear and Owens together...works like a charm. THANK YOU!!! 

Posts 26467
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 13 2016 11:13 AM

Sascha John:

what if you don't have Max & Mary

Unfortunately, I don't know Greek resources enough to offer another suggestion. What you want is something that will help with the uncommon grammar and vocabulary but will expect you to know the common stuff ... so you have to actually read the Greek nearly on your own.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 570
Schumitinu | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Feb 14 2016 1:32 AM

How is A Grammatical Analysis of the Greek New Testament different from Analytical Greek New Testament?

Posts 26467
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Feb 14 2016 1:50 AM

I don't own the Friberg morphology but the former A Grammatical Analysis of the Greek New Testament is a tool for reading the language not covering every item while Analytical Greek New Testament is a tagged resource for linguistic searches covering every item..

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 10030
Forum MVP
NB.Mick | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Feb 14 2016 6:11 AM

Schumitinu,

while I don't own Friberg either, I don't think a morphological analysis will get you that far (and if so, it's already contained in interlinears or even RIs).

Zerwick is very much comparable to the German works "Sprachlicher Schlüssel zum GNT" by Rienecker (ET: Linguistic Key to the GNT requested here and here ) and "Neuer Sprachlicher Schlüssel zum GNT" by Haubeck and Siebenthal (German edition on Logos PrePub - there seems to be a Spanish translation of it on Amazon, but no English one).

Those works not only give morphological parsing, but explain grammatical structure, e.g. in Mark 1 - as per MJ's screenshot - that Christ is gen.obj. which means it's the gospel about Jesus. All of those - unlike an interlinear or analytical GNT - don't give every word or lemma, because they assume familiarity with a vocabulary of words appearing more than 40, 60 or so times. Instead they focus on the grammatical and syntactical aspects, especially as they are relevant for understanding / translation. They give relevant cross-references and explanations. Zerwick links to his own grammar for deeper understanding of the Greek phenomena, my paper edition of H&S to the brief grammatical appendix (which probably is an excerpt of Siebenthal's NT Greek Grammar - also on PrePub). Occassionally H&S and quite frequently Rienecker may refer to technical commentaries (Rienecker very often cites Schlatter) for their explanations.

Hope this helps somewhat.

EDIT: @Sascha: If you don 't own it, you may consider buying it (good price given the value) - or wait for Haubeck/Siebenthal which one day should come around in a German language base package.

Running Logos 8 latest beta version on Win 10

Posts 15805
Forum MVP
Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 20 2016 10:24 PM

Schumitinu:

How is A Grammatical Analysis of the Greek New Testament different from Analytical Greek New Testament?

Keep Smiling Smile

Posts 2851
Sascha John | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Feb 20 2016 11:35 PM

Mick

thanks for the Tipp.

To the german Books I have both Siebenthal Books in Print (Grammar and Key..) so maybe some Day in a Base

Page 1 of 2 (22 items) 1 2 Next > | RSS