How do I make my NA28 talk to me?

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Posts 99
Zak Metz | Forum Activity | Posted: Tue, Feb 16 2016 9:01 AM

I see the icon for a speaker next to the NA28 in the Library. How do I make it read to me? Is this for individual words? I'm learning Greek pronunciation so this would be really useful to me.

Posts 2851
Sascha John | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Feb 16 2016 9:11 AM

STRG+R

Greetings

Posts 2756
Erwin Stull, Sr. | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Feb 16 2016 9:30 AM

Ctrl+R (for Windows machines). The voice should be John Schwandt, and not the computer voice, so the pronunciation will be in human form.

Posts 50
LogosEmployee
John Schwandt | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Feb 16 2016 9:52 AM

If you have a MAC it is Command + R.  You can also see the "read aloud" option in tile icon list.  (Click on the the tile icon in the upper left of the tile.)

Currently, there is only the Erasmian (Machen system) version for reading the text aloud.  This is the most common system for biblical Greek students.  For individual lemmas you can select between Modern, Koine, and Erasmian systems.  As you work on pronunciation, make sure that you place the stress on the proper syllable.  This is a challenge for many people (including professors) using an Erasmian system.  I went to great lengths to ensure the proper syllables were accented.  Also, bear in mind that Greek has never enjoyed the sound of vocalic stop and and start between syllables or words (contra. German).  You will hear some natural Greek blending of vowels in these situations.  Enjoy! 

Posts 431
Adam Olean | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 2 2016 6:54 PM

John Schwandt:

If you have a MAC it is Command + R.  You can also see the "read aloud" option in tile icon list.  (Click on the the tile icon in the upper left of the tile.)

Currently, there is only the Erasmian (Machen system) version for reading the text aloud.  This is the most common system for biblical Greek students.  For individual lemmas you can select between Modern, Koine, and Erasmian systems.  As you work on pronunciation, make sure that you place the stress on the proper syllable.  This is a challenge for many people (including professors) using an Erasmian system.  I went to great lengths to ensure the proper syllables were accented.  Also, bear in mind that Greek has never enjoyed the sound of vocalic stop and and start between syllables or words (contra. German).  You will hear some natural Greek blending of vowels in these situations.  Enjoy! 

John, thank you for the description of your approach. I would be interested to hear how you handle grave accents. I recall that Randall Buth would generally not accent these unless, for instance, he were reading rather slowly, a natural pause intervened, or perhaps the accent occurred on a marked focal constituent (e.g., in the case of a newly asserted argument or predicate being placed in a non-default position to highlight it, sometimes followed by clitic). In the latter case, examples abound everywhere, but I recall discussions on the B-Greek forum citing examples from John 1. For example, "θεὸς" in John 1:1c and "ζωὴ" in John 1:4a (UBS5):

1a Ἐν ἀρχῇ ἦν ὁ λόγος,

1b καὶ ὁ λόγος ἦν πρὸς τὸν θεόν,

1c καὶ θεὸς ἦν ὁ λόγος.

4a ἐν αὐτῷ ζωὴ ἦν,

4b καὶ ἡ ζωὴ ἦν τὸ φῶς τῶν ἀνθρώπων

(John 1:4b is kind of interesting too. Is the topic "ἡ ζωὴ" stressed or only the verb and predicate that follow? Of course, there are other cases when a grave might receive stress as well. I know that prosody in ancient texts is a major area of study with many open questions.)

Finally, I recall hearing that you've recorded the GNT in Koine and/or Modern Greek pronunciation(s). If so, it would be great to see such alternatives offered in Logos in the future. I admittedly abandoned "Erasmian" not long after finishing Mounce's grammar several years ago, if not earlier. I found your website and Buth's materials helpful (among other resources). Thank you for your contribution to teaching and producing such useful material!

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