When did "Reverend" come into use?

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JoshInRI | Forum Activity | Posted: Tue, Apr 4 2017 6:24 PM

I know some use Pastor so and so...but when did "Reverend" come into play?

Can anyone use Logos to provide an answer please.  Thanks.

Respectfully,

Joshua in Rhode Island
(where not many would be revered or even respected I suspect..rocky ground here.)

Posts 6497
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Apr 4 2017 6:32 PM

When men tried to be like God they started using reverend! Others can pitch in with the using Logos part :)

DAL

Posts 5251
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Apr 4 2017 7:59 PM

Reverend, a title prefixed by courtesy to the name of any clergyman, though “clerk” (clericus) is the legal and strictly proper description of clergymen, and is, in official documents, placed after (as “Reverend” is before) their names.

In the Church of England and the Protestant Episcopal and Roman Catholic churches the title is given to ecclesiastics of the second and third orders, the bishops being styled “right reverend.” In some churches ordained abbesses and prioresses are called “reverend mothers.”

 John M’Clintock and James Strong, “Reverend,” Cyclopædia of Biblical, Theological, and Ecclesiastical Literature (New York: Harper & Brothers, Publishers, 1894), 1075.

Reverend (Lat. reverendus, ‘worthy of being revered’). An epithet of respect applied to the clergy since the 15th cent. Since the 17th cent. it has been used as a title prefixed to their names in correspondence. Archbishops and the Bp. of Meath (as the ‘Premier Bp. of Ireland’) are styled ‘Most Reverend’, other bishops ‘Right Reverend’, and deans ‘Very Reverend’. Abbesses, prioresses, and other nuns who have the title of ‘Mother’, are also styled ‘Reverend’ (or sometimes ‘Very Reverend’ or ‘Right Reverend’). The *Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland is ‘Right Reverend’. *Carthusian priests are an exception, all except the prior-general being styled not ‘Reverend’ but ‘Venerable’. The legal right of Nonconformists to the title was established by the ‘Keat Case’ in 1876, when a faculty was ordered for the erection of a tombstone on which a *Wesleyan minister was styled ‘Reverend’, the incumbent having previously refused to allow it to be set up.

cent. century.

cent. century.

Bp. Bishop.

Bp. Bishop.

 F. L. Cross and Elizabeth A. Livingstone, eds., The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (Oxford;  New York: Oxford University Press, 2005), 1403.

Posts 522
Gordon Jones | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Apr 5 2017 10:34 AM

reverend, the ordinary English prefix of written address to the names of ministers of most Christian denominations. In the 15th century it was used as a general term of respectful address, but it has been habitually used as a title prefixed to the names of ordained clergymen since the 17th century. In the Church of England, prefects apostolic who are not in episcopal orders (e.g., deans, provosts, cathedral canons, rectors of seminaries and colleges, and priors and prioresses) are addressed as “very reverend.” Bishops, abbots, abbesses, and vicars-general are addressed as “right reverend,” and archbishops and (in Roman Catholicism) cardinals are addressed as “most reverend.” The moderator of the Church of Scotland is also styled “right reverend.” Carthusians use the title “reverend” only for their prior-general; all other Carthusian priests are styled “venerable father.” While, strictly speaking, the term is an adjective to be followed by “Doctor” or “Mister,” its common usage has made it a noun.

 Encyclopædia Britannica, Encyclopedia Britannica (Chicago, IL: Encyclopædia Britannica, 2016).

Posts 52
Ezra Miller | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Apr 6 2017 10:18 PM

I just heard this listening to Chuck Smith the other day at work.  It's on a podcast, I think it's the C2000 series, somewhere in the Psalms.  I can't remember how he got on the topic either, but he said there was nothing to revere about the name "Chuck Smith".  Ironic considering how many folks were at the CC CM when he was there.

Posts 1861
David Thomas | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Apr 7 2017 8:43 AM

I guess I need to repent. For decades I have been under the impression that for those in congregational polities that it was used not as TITLE, but an ADJECTIVE to describe one who reveres God and has been set apart (ordained). I only use the term when signing Marriage Licenses and certificates (Baptism, membership, ordination, etc.) and NEVER want to communicate the expectation that DAL reads into the term (2nd usage).

see the third usage

reverend

[rev-er-uh nd, rev-ruh nd] /ˈrɛv ər ənd, ˈrɛv rənd/  Spell Syllables See more synonyms on Thesaurus.com adjective 1. (initial capital letter) (used as a title of respect applied or prefixed to the name of a member of the clergy or a religious order): Reverend Timothy Cranshaw; Reverend Mother. 2. worthy to be revered; entitled to reverence. 3. pertaining to or characteristic of the clergy. noun 4. Informal. a member of the clergy.

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Posts 10243
Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Apr 7 2017 9:09 AM

I think much has to do with traditions.

I'm to the right of DAL ... 'reverend' is inconceivable and even role tiles are artificial (eg pastor, father, etc). I ended up along the lines of Didache ... beware those who want to park and ask for money. This isn't to suggest I'm right. Only the dead know for sure.  But rejecting the titles and roles sounds disrespectful to most traditions. Egotistical, etc.


Posts 1026
EastTN | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Apr 7 2017 9:24 AM

Denise:

I think much has to do with traditions.

I'm to the right of DAL ... 'reverend' is inconceivable and even role tiles are artificial (eg pastor, father, etc). I ended up along the lines of Didache ... beware those who want to park and ask for money. This isn't to suggest I'm right. Only the dead know for sure.  But rejecting the titles and roles sounds disrespectful to most traditions. Egotistical, etc.

I think you're right about our use of titles being driven by tradition. I find it instructive that the New Testament spoke of the functions people performed - elder, deacon, pastor, bishop, evangelist, prophet, teacher - without adding any honorifics. This suggests the focus should be on how we can serve the church, rather than on personal status .

Posts 1699
JoshInRI | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Apr 8 2017 7:29 AM

Once again I am humbled and blessed by your courteous wise replies.

Thanks everyone.

Posts 6497
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Apr 8 2017 11:55 AM

Psalm 111:9 contains the word "Reverend" and it applies it to God.   Another synonym is the word "awesome."  According to some dictionaries the correct way  of using Reverend is by adding the definite article "The;"  hence "The Reverend John Doe."  But if the people that use this word as a title are interested in titles, then why not use the synonym also and call themselves "The awesome John Doe."  Well the answer I got once is that they don't want to sound stupid.  So that should tell you where their hearts are in regards to using titles just to be acknowledged by men. 

My extra two cents!

Blessings!

DAL

Ps.  By the way recently I met some guy that wanted to be called "The senior pastor" and his wife had the audacity to be telling the ladies that she wanted to be called "the first lady."  And here I was thinking I had heard it all!!! 😂

Posts 1861
David Thomas | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Apr 8 2017 12:17 PM

DAL:
Psalm 111:9 contains the word "Reverend" and it applies it to God.  
I had to do a Logos search on this word to find out how many translations use this gloss. I only found it in the ASV, AV, KJV, NKJV family of translations that I own. Interested to find it also in the paraphrase "The Message" in Matthew 23:7.

The translation ring in Bible Word Study for the Hebrew word in KJV reveals some other translations that few pastors would want associated with their character - not a whole lot of pastors want to be introduced as "the terrible Dave Thomas" or "the dreadful Dave Thomas"

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DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Apr 8 2017 5:48 PM

David Thomas:

DAL:
Psalm 111:9 contains the word "Reverend" and it applies it to God.  
I had to do a Logos search on this word to find out how many translations use this gloss. I only found it in the ASV, AV, KJV, NKJV family of translations that I own. Interested to find it also in the paraphrase "The Message" in Matthew 23:7.

The translation ring in Bible Word Study for the Hebrew word in KJV reveals some other translations that few pastors would want associated with their character - not a whole lot of pastors want to be introduced as "the terrible Dave Thomas" or "the dreadful Dave Thomas"

Thank You!

DAL

Posts 522
Gordon Jones | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 9 2017 1:56 AM

My understanding is that Reverend is a style rather than a title, the latter being conferred by an official institution and the former either a style of courtesy when used by others or self-styled when applied to oneself.

In the US, doctors are Doctors because their degree confers upon them the title of Medical Doctor (M.D.). In the UK, however, medical doctors graduate either with the title of Bachelor or, more commonly here in Scotland, Master. Yet everyone in the UK calls them Doctor because that is the traditional style. It is a courtesy title which acknowledges their expertise in a particular field.

As for Reverend, which I am happy to use of clergy/pastors in the same way I am happy to use the days of the week without conferring praise on Norse or Roman deities, I had assumed that the ending "-end" came from a (North?) Germanic root (cf. -ing) indicating that Reverend was someone who worships (God) and leads others in that worship. It seems I may have been incorrect and that it was, like doctors in the UK, more of a courtesy. It would be interesting to see the earliest examples of its usage.

Blessings on you all.

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Rich DeRuiter | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 9 2017 8:27 AM

When I was a child (several eons ago), the man in front (and he was always male then), was invariably called Reverend [last name]. Somewhere during my lifetime that changed to Pastor [first name].

I'm curious about both trends: the one you are pursuing, and the change to the currently common title of respect.

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PetahChristian | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 9 2017 8:54 AM

David Thomas:

DAL:
Psalm 111:9 contains the word "Reverend" and it applies it to God.  
The translation ring in Bible Word Study for the Hebrew word in KJV reveals some other translations that few pastors would want associated with their character - not a whole lot of pastors want to be introduced as "the terrible Dave Thomas" or "the dreadful Dave Thomas"

Also Psalm 99:3 "thy great and terrible name; for it is holy." Daniel 9:4 "the great and dreadful God." Nehemiah 1:5 "the great and terrible God."

Who is like God?

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DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 9 2017 9:23 AM

PetahChristian:

David Thomas:

DAL:
Psalm 111:9 contains the word "Reverend" and it applies it to God.  
The translation ring in Bible Word Study for the Hebrew word in KJV reveals some other translations that few pastors would want associated with their character - not a whole lot of pastors want to be introduced as "the terrible Dave Thomas" or "the dreadful Dave Thomas"

Also Psalm 99:3 "thy great and terrible name; for it is holy." Daniel 9:4 "the great and dreadful God." Nehemiah 1:5 "the great and terrible God."

Who is like God?

Youth ministers with a PhD will soon start calling themselves Doctor Dread to sound cool LOL 😂 

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PetahChristian | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 9 2017 9:34 AM

That's the thing about God. He doesn't have to come across as cool or hip or anything.

We can humble ourselves and exalt Him, or He can humble us.

Posts 52
Ezra Miller | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 9 2017 9:17 PM

For my experiences as a child, the pastor always was scary to me.  Now that I'm older, and have experienced life a bit, titles don't scare me.  I'm not afraid to question what a pastor says, in a respectful way, not just "Hey idiot! What are you talking about?" from the pew.  One thing I see with titles is a lot of guys who want to be like Benny Hinn or whomever else that makes gobs of money through scams use the term or title "Reverend". That's why I stay away from folks that have that title.  I usually will try to find what they are wanting--to share the love of Christ or to fill their pockets.

Posts 2340
Jan Krohn | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 10 2017 1:57 AM

From Wikipedia:

It is the gerundive or future passive participle of the verb revereri ("to respect; to revere"), meaning "[one who is] to be revered/must be respected".

From what I remember about my Latin classes, there's no way to give this an "active" meaning (the one who reveres). The one who reveres would be something like "Reverens", not "Referend".

I have to agree with DAL here...

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Josh Hunt | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Apr 10 2017 5:39 AM

I prefer just to be called by my first name. 

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