Stelle in Philo gesucht

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Sascha John | Forum Activity | Posted: Mon, May 8 2017 1:40 AM

Hallo 

kann mir jemand sagen welches Werk das ist ich find die Stelle weder im Internet noch in meinem Logos Philo

Philo de profug IV, 262 sqq.

Danke

Sascha

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ilian | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, May 8 2017 4:46 AM

Sascha John:

kann mir jemand sagen welches Werk das ist ich find die Stelle weder im Internet noch in meinem Logos Philo

Philo de profug IV, 262 sqq.

Hi Sascha, kannst du etwas über den Kontext sagen? Das könnte bei der Suche helfen...

"de profug."sollte m.E. "De Profugis" (Περι φυγαδων - über Flüchtlinge) heißen. Das kann ich jedoch nicht richtig einordnen. Ich bin kein Philo-Kenner...

Aber "IV, 262" könnte folgendes Zitat sein:

"What of Moses? Is he not everywhere celebrated as a prophet? For it says, “if a prophet of the Lord arise among you, I will be known to him in vision, but to Moses in actual appearance and not through riddles” (Num. 12:6, 8), and again “there no more rose up a prophet like Moses, whom the Lord knew face to face” (Deut. 34:10)."

Philo. (1929–1962). Philo. (F. H. Colson, G. H. Whitaker, & J. W. Earp, Übers.) (Bd. 4, S. 417). London; England; Cambridge, MA: William Heinemann Ltd; Harvard University Press.

τί δὲ Μωυσῆς; οὐ προφήτης ᾄδεται πανταχοῦ; λέγει γάρ· “ἐὰν γένηται ὑμῶν προφήτης κυρίου, ἐν ὁράματι αὐτῷ γνωσθήσομαι, Μωυσῇ δὲ ἐν εἴδει, καὶ οὐ διʼ αἰνιγμάτων,” καὶ πάλιν “οὐκ ἀνέστη ἔτι προφήτης ὡς Μωυσῆς, ὃν ἔγνω κύριος αὐτὸν πρόσωπον πρὸς πρόσωπον.”

Philo. (1929–1962). Philo: Greek Text. London; Cambridge, MA: William Heinemann Ltd; Harvard University Press.

Passt das zum Kontext?

Posts 2851
Sascha John | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, May 8 2017 9:33 AM

Danke Illian

Es geht um die Freistädte bei Ambrosius Flucht vor der Welt. Er bezieht sich auf Philo. Deine Vermutung mit der Übersetzung.

[1][[On Flight and Finding 94–96 >> https://ref.ly/logosres/philo;ref=WorksOfPhilo.Fug_94-96;off=256;ctx=are_six_in_numbers._~Perhaps_we_may_say_t]]  | The Works of Philo 
„Perhaps we may say that the most ancient, and the strongest, and the most excellent metropolis, for I may not call it merely a city, is the divine word, to flee to which first is the most advantageous course of all. (95) But the other five, being as it were colonies of that one, are the powers of Him who utters the word, the chief of which is his creative power, according to which the Creator made the world with a word; the second is his kingly power, according to which he who has created rules over what is created; the third is his merciful power, in respect of which the Creator pities and shows mercy towards his own work; the fourth is his legislative power, by which he forbids what may not be done. […]

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