Rights associated with Logos notes

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Jim | Forum Activity | Posted: Wed, May 12 2010 3:18 PM

Here's an interesting thread on Amazon uploading people's notes on books they read in Kindle.

A few comments raise interesting concerns.

If I keep notes in Logos that I later intend to use for a book, am I risking compromising my interest and rights to that material by letting Logos store those notes?

There are already world-wide conversations about the legal responsibilities and rights of storage providers. If an internet service provider can be forced by a government to hand over even temporary information, can they force Logos to hand over user notes in a legal case?

In these times, criticism of people's "life-styles" can be considered criminal in the UK and other countries. Suppose Logos' servers are hacked or information leaked through a mistake that leads to incarceration, fines or death. You might not think this is an issue because we all have the best of intentions, but the world around us is building quite an anti-Christian attitude. Logos' users are also not restricted to living in the United States.

Given the direction society is going in, I'm beginning to be more defensive about information.

I don't think Logos can take the approach of asking all of us to assume that they are entirely neutral or benevolent in this issue. They might intend to be, but can be forced to divulge information that an evil society can use to damage people.

At the very least, just as Logos licenses their product with a contract to customers, they should at least enter into a contract to keep anything a user writes absolutely confidential. Is that in place? I don't remember seeing anything about it when I bought L4? Did I miss anything? 

Have a great day,
jmac

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Fred Chapman | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, May 12 2010 3:35 PM

Jim:

Here's an interesting thread on Amazon uploading people's notes on books they read in Kindle.

A few comments raise interesting concerns.

If I keep notes in Logos that I later intend to use for a book, am I risking compromising my interest and rights to that material by letting Logos store those notes?

There are already world-wide conversations about the legal responsibilities and rights of storage providers. If an internet service provider can be forced by a government to hand over even temporary information, can they force Logos to hand over user notes in a legal case?

In these times, criticism of people's "life-styles" can be considered criminal in the UK and other countries. Suppose Logos' servers are hacked or information leaked through a mistake that leads to incarceration, fines or death. You might not think this is an issue because we all have the best of intentions, but the world around us is building quite an anti-Christian attitude. Logos' users are also not restricted to living in the United States.

Given the direction society is going in, I'm beginning to be more defensive about information.

I don't think Logos can take the approach of asking all of us to assume that they are entirely neutral or benevolent in this issue. They might intend to be, but can be forced to divulge information that an evil society can use to damage people.

At the very least, just as Logos licenses their product with a contract to customers, they should at least enter into a contract to keep anything a user writes absolutely confidential. Is that in place? I don't remember seeing anything about it when I bought L4? Did I miss anything? 

Jim I cannot speak regarding the intellectual rights regarding our notes, however as far as a government entity gaining forcing logos to provide information regarding our data, there is probably not a legitimate concern there. If they want the data and have a case that enables them to get a warrent requiring Logos to provide information on you, they probably have a case that is good enough to get a warrent to search your computer(s). So they are going to get it either way.

If they are ever interested in my notes it must mean they have solved every other crime on the books and are just bored.Smile

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JimTowler | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, May 12 2010 4:58 PM

Jim:
Given the direction society is going in, I'm beginning to be more defensive about information.

The points you raise, and the comments in the Amazon thread (to this date/time) raise valid concerns for some users of these kinds of devices, web-services or reader applications.

Myself and others have been asking for the choice to disable the SYNC of our user-generated content so it is NOT stored on the Logos servers.

Idealy, we could set the sync control to one of: Solid OFF, Default OFF but by document, Default ON but by document, Solid ON. Then a flag for each user item, that could be set and display to indicate state.

To date, Logos has not been prepaired to provide anything other than what amounts to the "Solid ON" as above. At best, its possible to disable some of the automatic use of the internet within the application, but its an all-or-nothing switch. To disable SYNC that way, you need to give up "Report Typo", Homepage information and maybe a few lesser things. Not ideal.

At least one user is known to have found a way to block sync by controlling what external IP connections are permitted, but its less than idea, and the application never gives up doing retries all day.

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, May 12 2010 5:07 PM

Today's New York Times had an article on the Microsoft Office 2010 free cloud computing version and the $500 version due out in June. Having always preferred off-site backups, I have no problem turning the subtleties of data preservation over to those who specialize in the area.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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Jim VanSchoonhoven | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, May 12 2010 5:18 PM

Fred, I could not disagree with you more, Jim may be off in some areas, but his concerns are valid and in the next few years this will become more clear to those that have open minds.

Even now there are becoming more and more abuses of power under different laws that most Americans don't even know are on the books.

I seriously doubt that these abuses can be stopped at this point in time, but at least if a person is open minded, when things become worse a person may be able to avoid some of the problems that otherwise would certainly fall upon him and his family.  

In Christ,

Jim 

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, May 12 2010 5:34 PM

JimVanSchoonhoven:
Fred, I could not disagree with you more,

Can we declare politics, social prognostication, legal rulings, judgment of individuals, etc. as all NOT related to Logos software? I probably should edit or remove my previous post.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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Floyd Johnson | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, May 12 2010 5:45 PM

MJ. Smith:
Can we declare politics, social prognostication, legal rulings, judgment of individuals, etc. as all NOT related to Logos software? I probably should edit or remove my previous post.

MJ:

I usually agree with you - but this time I do not.  As long as LOGOS has chosen to store information on their (or on other's) servers, it seems wise to discuss the legal and ethical ramifications of choosing to let them do so.  It may be tiring to hear some of the same arguments restated, but it is an important discussion - regardless of your concerns or the lack there of.

Blessings,
Floyd

Pastor-Patrick.blogspot.com

Posts 1367
JimTowler | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, May 12 2010 5:54 PM

Floyd Johnson:
As long as LOGOS has chosen to store information on their (or on other's) servers, it seems wise to discuss the legal and ethical ramifications of choosing to let them do so.  It may be tiring to hear some of the same arguments restated, but it is an important discussion - regardless of your concerns or the lack there of.

It tiring to still be asking for the choice to turn off SYNC for some or all of our own content.

Yes - its an important discussion, and it is about Logos and the Logos applications, so it belongs here.

For now, I have blocked all SYNC, but I would much rather turn it back on, and just turn off a flag on a few selected items as it suits me.

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, May 12 2010 6:16 PM

Floyd Johnson:
it seems wise to discuss the legal and ethical ramifications of choosing to let them do so.

I agree - when that is being discussed. However, "I seriously doubt that these abuses can be stopped at this point in time, but at least if a person is open minded, when things become worse a person may be able to avoid some of the problems that otherwise would certainly fall upon him and his family.  " is NOT a discussion of legal and ethical ramifications. That post is the one that made me not want to go over this again.

I had gone back and removed much of my original post to stick solely to legal issues - which would be very appropriate if people could speak from knowledge (which I do not have) instead of passing on third-hand fears. For example, I do think a group of UK users presented a solid case based on UK law that they need the ability to label prayer lists as not synced - recognizing explicitly the loss of functionality in backup and syncing multiple copies.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Anonymous | | Replied: Wed, May 12 2010 6:27 PM

IMHO,

The right way that cloud services (whether Logos, Microsoft, Google, Amazon, etc) should be done is for the client end to do strong encryption so that the servers are only  storing encrypted files that they nor any government can access without the decryption key that only the end-user has access to.  The reasons this is not done, are, I think, twofold:

1) It adds complexity for the end user.  Now to access files from different client devices, he has to get the keys onto that device.  Anyone who's wrestled with ssh keys knows what a pain that can be, especially when the keys need to be changed.

2) The server companies want access to the data, at least in aggregate, for various purposes.  Some not so bad (to improve service based on usage), some pretty bad (targeted advertising).

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Jim VanSchoonhoven | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, May 12 2010 7:51 PM

MJ. Smith the fact that you state my comment was not addressing legal and ethical ramifications is shocking because that is what I am addressing without going into details, which, I can not go into.

I would be interested what do you assume I was talking about???

In Christ,

Jim

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, May 12 2010 11:07 PM

JimVanSchoonhoven:
I would be interested what do you assume I was talking about???

It is awkward to determine how to answer you without crossing lines of courtesy and propriety. I think the best way for me to handle this is to ask you to identify the following elements of your post for me:

  • factual statements of valid concerns (yes, I agree there are valid concerns)
  • factual statements concerning how cloud computing raises these concerns
  • factual statements concerning the ramifications of law with regards to cloud computing
  • concrete examples of changes in legal rulings that effect the valid concerns
  • unsubstantiated assertions as to the effects of cloud computing
  • classification of people who do/do not agree with asserted concerns
  • unsubstantiated assertions on the consequences for those in the "wrong" classification

I apologize that I have not found a more neutral way to describe the type of statements I consider to address legal and ethical concerns and those I do not. However, let me put this in the context of how I evaluate a line of argument, in general:

  1. Identify each assertion
  2. Cross out clearly fallacious assertions (emotional appeals etc.)
  3. Link assertions that are made in support of another assertion to that assertion.
  4. Link assertions that are made to deny another assertion to that assertion.
  5. Mark assertions into 3 groups - those that I know to be true, those that I know to be false and those that require research for me to have a well-formed opinion.
  6. Develop a well-formed opinion including an awareness of what type of information would require that I re-evaluate my opinion.

An imperfect answer but the best I can come up with for now.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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Jim VanSchoonhoven | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, May 12 2010 11:57 PM

MJ. Smith, I have no idea how any of your last statements related to you thinking I was not addressing an opinion on the legal and ethical ramifictions. Maybe you need to reread my post.

I was very general in my comments, and I will keep my statements general concerning our rights, and for a good reason, you can take heed concerning my words or not, it is up to you, but keep an open mind and keep your eyes open, in the media, about abuses of power, by this country, look in the areas of telephone and internet records being searched without proper authority.  There are examples in the last few years of some very interesting court cases concerning certain abuses that were discovered. 

We don't need to get carried away on these subjects, but it is nice to know if a bus is out of control and heading your way,  so that you are able to step out of the way of the bus if you can.

By the way Libronix 3 did not have these concerns.

I will state it again, Jim has valid concerns!

In Christ,

Jim

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, May 13 2010 12:00 AM

JimVanSchoonhoven:
I will state it again, Jim has valid concerns!

Which I have consistently recognized. So we'll leave it there.Smile

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 668
Jim | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jun 14 2010 11:42 AM

Excerpt from a 1/20/10 article: [emphasis mine]

Microsoft Corp.'s top legal official today called on Congress to create new laws that would give data stored in the cloud the same protections as data stored on a PC. He also called for tougher penalties for hackers who access data centers, citing significant damage that's often done in such attacks....

 

And in the same article concerning a contract between the City of Los Angeles and Google:

 

Moreover, the contract signed last October obligates Google to keep the city's data physically located in the United States. The contract allows the city to audit the data to ensure compliance...

 

And near the conclusion

 

Users of cloud services will need to know what is happening to their data, Nelson added. Cloud providers will not only have to ensure data is safe, but "we are going to have to show them why it is safe," he said, and that will mean having technology that can show customers when their data is accessed.

Jonathan Rochelle, a group product manager at Google, said there is nothing special about the privacy and security risks in the cloud, but those risk are "more transparent, more collective and more open. "

Mark Rasch, attorney and technology expert, writes [2008]:

This iteration of "cloud computing" puts your personal data on an accessible server held by a third party, which you replicate on multiple machines and access from virtually anywhere. Putting aside the security, data storage, data retention, data destruction and other pesky issues associated with doing business in the cloud, one fundamental issue remains: Your data is being hosted, stored and transmitted through a third party.  As far as the law is concerned then, that third party has control of your data and may therefore be subject to a subpoena for your data, often without your knowledge or ability to object.

In "Who owns the data cloud, the answers could get tricky [2010]"  at Government Computer News, participants in a panel make these comments:

Cloud computing refers to services, applications, and data storage delivered online through powerful file servers. ....Why do we [the US gov't] have our data in India or China or other places where they shouldn’t be?....The hard question from a public cloud perspective is, how do you ensure the data is now your property and not the property of the cloud vendor?...One possible way to maintain control is to encrypt the data before it leaves the organization’s boundary. It would only be decrypted when it gets back into the enterprise.

These articles show that knowledgeable companies, government agencies and individuals are concerned about the issues I brought up in my original post. It certainly seems that legal issues regarding ownership rights and data security in cloud computing are important and lack clear legal definition. It is then up to the vendors of such services to establish clear policies and contractual guarantees as best they can and to inform their customers of legal responsibilities as well as risks. Again I ask has Logos done this and I missed it? (If so, it wouldn't be the first time I've raised an issue out of ignoranceWink)

Christians can be, and in my opinion will certainly be, in a more precarious situation than the general public in regards to their cloud data. And if so the reason would be due to the cultural atmosphere. The general public seems to be marching (or marched) down the path of political correctness. They certainly have no philosophy to oppose it with. Christians might argue that we don't have anything to fear since we aren't crooks nor have malicious or harmful intent. But maliciousness is becoming a matter of political correctness.

The governments of Europe and the USA are focused upon political correctness. The legal guarantees and definitions of the original US constitution have now been twisted to fit these current philosophies. In the UK a pastor was recently arrested (then released) for making casual comments about homosexuality while witnessing. This was not an isolated case by far. The general tenor of the power elite is that a Christianity that calls people to repentance and Biblical moral accountability is a significant source of irritation and problems. I certainly don't preach against people with a judgmental attitude, but simple Biblical truth about sin is becoming more and more offensive to our society as they reject God more and more.

Fred made the point that the government can get my personal PC too. But the difference is that it is a lot harder to search through thousands of individual computers spread out all over the country/world than it is to search Logos' data base.

Please note that missionaries in sensitive countries already keep such data in encrypted partitions on their HDD,  so this is not a futuristic, trivial point.

Again I'm just thinking about the future based upon trends I see going on. I think that Solomon's advice was to do just that, so I'm not ashamed of asking some prudent questions.

As a result of thinking this over, I'm just going get into the habit of keeping my personal commentary, sermons etc. outside of Logos4 and only storing stuff that is direct quotations and links to references inside Logos4. Who knows, maybe someday just owning certain resources will be criminal, but since I think that's a way off in the future yet,  I won't be that paranoid now. 

Have a great day,
jmac

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Bobby Terhune | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jun 14 2010 1:14 PM

Jim,

I have a question about your comment about political correctness. If my thoughts (Logos Notes) can get me into trouble, I would think the fact that I have a large library of politically incorrect Christian books licensed to me and stored on my computer will by then have become a problem for me.

After all, the books I have contain hate speech by some accounts, and the fact I own these books can be construed by some authorities as reflecting my views as well. If things get that weird, it will probably be the local authorities or local people that know us that would turn us in or report us. If we live as Christians, the authorities should not have any trouble finding us, and I think my notes in the cloud will make little difference to the outcome for my life.

Posts 668
Jim | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jun 14 2010 3:39 PM

BobbyTerhune:
After all, the books I have contain hate speech by some accounts, and the fact I own these books can be construed by some authorities as reflecting my views

I made that point at the end of my last post. Historically that type of discrimination has been employed. It's not a serious issue in the US yet, however the trend is moving in that direction and already has serious momentum. Who knows if and when it will become an urgent matter to us. But the signs of it are getting stronger by the year. Logos is building a platform for the future so I bring these things up as something that I would feel better if they were considered now.

 

Have a great day,
jmac

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Rich DeRuiter | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jun 15 2010 8:39 AM

As an amateur song-writer, I've looked into copyright issues from a particular perspective, but I have at least looked into them.

There are two levels of copyright in the U.S. One is where material is registered as copyrighted with the government, and the other is where a copyright is simply asserted by an individual without registering the copyright with the government. Both have legal standing, though the former has a stronger legal standing than the latter.

In addition to that there are different uses of materials that copyright covers: to use material as one's own (e.g., when one does research for a company that uses the material produced as it's own material without attributing individual authorship); to produce derivative material (as an editing committee might do after contracting out a portion of a work to an individual researcher, but not quoting directly from the author's work); distribution of the attributed material (as in the Logos Sermon File addin, which posts sermons to the Logos sermon web site); and performance/display of a work of art (e.g., music, a play, etc.).

It's critical to understand what kind of copyright we're talking about here, and what use we want to control.

First, it's possible to use the assertion of copyright to add a level of legal standing to anything we write (or compose), by simply putting the notice "(c) Copyright, 2010, Richard DeRuiter, all rights reserved" at the end of any piece of information we want to protect in some way. Normally, for the way I use notes, I'm not going to do this. It's overkill. If someone wants to claim credit for the idea that 'mortal bodies' in Romans 8:11 (NIV) is thematically connected to 'body of death" in Rom 7:24, that's fine with me, and I couldn't prove that they came up with the observation independently of me anyway.

Nor would I find it necessary to assert a copyright on material that is on a server somewhere, but encrypted, or otherwise unavailable (by other security measures) to anyone but me. It's another example of overkill (IMHO).

But if I'd put that same material on a blog, I might want to, especially if I wanted to protect my rights to publish such material for profit, or protect it from others who might. Here too a simple assertion of copyright may be enough.

On the other hand, if I'm doing ground-breaking research in an area of value to others, I may want to protect my work in a more formal sense. And if I were to publish my work in book (or other form) for general distribution, I'd want a higher level of copyright protection. This means money, and sometimes lawyers, so it's not something I'm likely to do very often, if ever.

Between these two is a hybrid-option that some song-writers use: assert the copyright and then send yourself a registered letter with a copy of the material inside. This is a way to prove that you have the material in your hand at a prior date to one who may assert that he/she is the real author of the material.

Please note that these things are all hotly debated by authors, song-writers, etc.

Regarding distribution rights, two things seem clear: first, when we agree to Logos EULA, we agree to allow Logos to store our personally generated documents on its servers. It's legally difficult to get around that agreement. Second, it's not clear that copyright protection would help keep these documents from government scrutiny. That is really a constitutional matter for the U.S. (other countries will have their own protections -- or lack of them -- in place).

Having said all that, let me assert my opinion (which carries no legal weight, of course) on the copyright status of user notes and other user documents generated in L4: As long as notes can be tied to the author who generated them, that material belongs to the one who generated the material. If we quote copyrighted material, the same rules apply as anywhere else: if we should publish or distribute our notes for others, we must attribute material we quote to its author. If we're only quoting material for personal use (think of the analogy of note cards in research), I don't think there's anything to worry about, from a legal perspective (though it makes finding the source harder later, should we decide to use the quote).

Privacy and confidentiality are really separate matters, have almost nothing to do with copyrights (except for a discussion on distribution rights), and have been discussed extensively on these forums. I don't see a need to repeat my views in this thread. But I will say this: even if L4 did not upload information to it's servers, the note system is not confidential and, in my opinion, does not meet any standard of confidentiality. Anyone with access to your copy of L4 on your computer can read your notes. Further such breaches, closer to those affected, has a higher potential to do harm to the one who's confidentiality is breached. Pastors and other church leaders should never store confidential information on any computer at any time, unless those files are protected by a password known only to those who have a right to see that confidential information. Period. (Note that I distinguish privacy: protecting my personal information, from confidentiality: protecting private information entrusted to me.)

Finally, should society decide that it is illegal to be an authentic, Bible-believing/living, born-again, spirit-filled Christian, I would hope that there would be plenty of other evidence to convict me than what may be found in my Logos notes.

 Help links: WIKI;  Logos 6 FAQ. (Phil. 2:14, NIV)

Posts 668
Jim | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jun 15 2010 11:39 AM

Richard, I always appreciate your posts and this was no different. I too have had some involvement with copyrights, but its been quite some time ago so your info was helpful. The idea of the registered letter is interesting. I suppose you have to keep it sealed until presented in evidence in a court?

You are certainly right on target when you say

it's not clear that copyright protection would help keep these documents from government scrutiny
.
I'd say it is NO protection. It's even debated whether copyright is of ANY protection NOW. It is probably more of a protection if you are very wealthy and there is a lot of money at stake.

Here's some further thoughts prompted by your post (keep in mind I'm not a lawyer, but have had a little bit of experience with patent and copyright material and that I too am just expressing my opinions):

  • Up until recently, what we kept on our physical computers has been no different than what we kept on paper in a set of file drawers. If we take reasonable measures to control access, then the information can be considered owned by us and private. The definition of reasonable measures is going to depend on the environment. In our homes or private office we may not need to lock the files, but in a high traffic area a lock is necessary. The more measures we take to exert control over our material the easier it is to defend a claim of privacy and rights associated with ownership. The same applies to a computer. If we keep our computers in our physical possession, locked up and perhaps password protected or encrypted if necessary, then anyone who copies and uses our info without our explicit permission could be legally liable for damage or loss of income we may suffer. But just because one or two friends or colleagues do read it with or without our permission does not technically constitute publication.
  • Original sermons, Bible study lessons as well as written words and artwork are the author's creative work and can be considered their intellectual property if they take appropriate measures to keep them private. They then have the right to copyright them, profit from them, and control their distribution.
  • As you know, if someone publishes their material, that is, clearly makes it available for general consumption without the copyright notice, then they cannot later claim copyright protection.
  • Some publishers will not consider work that has been previously make public.
  • You said
    As long as notes can be tied to the author who generated them, that material belongs to the one who generated the material.
    As you already know, the key issue in claiming legal ownership is the action taken to control access.
  • Now the internet changes all this. People are finding out the emails are not private property. Even their searches are subject to government surveillance. Now comes cloud computing. Cloud computing is similar to keeping your papers/notes in a file cabinet located in a public storage facility where thousands of people come and go to store their files. If you do that, then your rights of ownership are going to depend upon the contract you have with the owners of the facility, the measures they take to protect your material and the laws governing that kind of business. Keeping with this analogy, it would be prudent then to consider what "neighborhood" the storage facility is located in. Is it a high crime area? Do the criminals have powerful tools? Is corruption common in the local culture? If so I'd at least expect very strong protections (walls, gates, locks, lights, patrol guards) and strong guarantees from the owner. I would also want to know what the local laws are (where the files are physically stored) and how that local government has applied them and how they are likely to apply them in the future.
  • Logos may have the best of intentions. But there is already precedence that since businesses have more at stake and are more visible targets than individuals government pressure is effective at getting them to reveal data.
  • This is somewhat similar to a situation we had about 10 years ago. Churches were getting gung-ho about putting all manner of church activities and information on the web because that's what the world was doing. "Let promote our missionaries!" Sounded wonderful at first. However we had to quickly stop people from putting pictures and information about missionaries serving in certain countries because it would endanger their ministry and in some cases, lives.

Perhaps people think I'm a nut at this point but I just think we should consider that we are ambassadors and aliens in a foreign kingdom and act accordingly. Furthermore I have found in my career that it's the things you take for granted that come back to bite you. At the very least I'm hoping that this thread will alert people to think about these things.

I'd like to see Logos honor these concerns in the design of the program. For example, allow people the option to flag some user data so it will not be stored on their server. I also think that the program needs a clear indication at the top that shows "working offline". It's too late when you see the little arrows going 'round when you didn't want to be on line. Frankly, if I was going to certain countries to work, I would not want Logos 4. Even a slight slip of it sending data through foreign ISPs could spell difficulty or disaster.

Have a great day,
jmac

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jun 15 2010 12:38 PM

Richard DeRuiter:
As an amateur song-writer, I've looked into copyright issues from a particular perspective, but I have at least looked into them.

Thank you for bringing your experience to the topic. What you say corresponds to the free legal advice to artists with regards to poetry and literature. I also appreciate your making the distinction between privacy and confidentiality; they are not the same and should not be confused.

If someone is truly concerned about the copyright, they can add a final note to each note file asserting their copyright to the material. However, if I were to take that tack, I'd be more concerned that my quoting of other sources clearly fall within fair use guidelines.

If someone is truly concerned about search warrants (yes I understand this may not apply in certain mission countries), remember that a search warrant can be obtained for your computer and files just as easily (or with as much difficulty) as for your off-site storage ("cloud" if you insist).

Now can we all recite together Matthew 6:34. I'm tired of flogging a dead horse.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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