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Tom Parker | Forum Activity | Posted: Tue, Jun 12 2018 2:05 AM

I'm not sure whether this is particularly the correct place to post. However, I am looking for any resources available that might help me make use of the morph data on logos. It seems I have countless lexicons, but what I am after is a resource that might help translate "ἁγιαζόμενοι" in the sense of what the "VPPP-PNM" morph might mean, how it can be translated etc. beyond simply offering a translation of ἁγιάζω. I know BDAG gets a lot of love, but I think it may be too expensive and too advanced for what I need. What I am after is a way of being able to quickly tell on Logos what the morphology of a word might mean. (i.e. what it means that ἁγιαζόμενοι is a present passive participle etc. in terms of translation).

I hope that makes sense, any advice is gratefully received.

Posts 277
Lonnie Spencer | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jul 2 2018 9:20 PM

Tom,

I think what you are looking for is not a lexicon, which would give you lemma definitions, but a Greek grammar that would help explain how a participle, or other parts of morphology works in Greek. You may want to look at something like Wallace, "Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics."  He not only explains morphology but also includes a lot of examples that is helpful.  If you have no background with Greek you may want to check out the elementary Greek grammars like Mounce or Black. Grammars are just as important to know what's going on as the lexicons.

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Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jul 3 2018 9:41 AM

Tom Parker:
What I am after is a way of being able to quickly tell on Logos what the morphology of a word might mean.

Forum thread => Greek "cheat sheet" available? includes product link => http://www.logos.com/product/198/greek-new-testament-insert

Participles

Participles are verbal adjectives. They have characteristics of both the verb and the adjective. There are 6674 participles in the Greek New Testament, outnumbering infinitives by almost three to one; roughly one out of 20 words is a participle, and even then, their significance outweighs their number. The interpretation and classification of participles is one of the most important features of New Testament exegesis. First, identify the participle fully as to form (gender, case, number, tense, voice, mood, source); second, determine whether the participle should be classified as attributive, substantival, predicate, adverbial, or supplementary.

 Chapman, B., & Shogren, G. S. (1994). Greek New Testament Insert (2nd ed., revised.). Quakertown, PA: Stylus Publishing.

Thread => Learning Biblical Greek includes product link => Learning New Testament Greek Now and Then

Thread => Help with Greek includes Greek Morphology visual filter examples

Keep Smiling Smile

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Mark Barnes | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Jul 3 2018 1:51 PM

Tom Parker:
what I am after is a resource that might help translate "ἁγιαζόμενοι" in the sense of what the "VPPP-PNM" morph might mean, how it can be translated etc. beyond simply offering a translation of ἁγιάζω

If you hover over the word ἁγιαζόμενοι in most Bibles, at the bottom-left of the Bible panel, you'll see a little hover box that will say: verb present participle passive plural nominative masculine. That's what the VPPP-PNM stands for.

If you want the same information displayed more clearly, you can right-click on the word and display the Informational Panel. Under the section Word Info, you'll see the name text.

The even better thing about the Informational Panel is that if you hover over the words, they'll get defined. So if you're not sure what nominative means, hover over it, and you'll get a simple definition.

Another quick tip: if you click the arrow at the very top left of the informational panel, you'll get a drop down menu allowing you to choose whether the panel updates on hover or click. I personally much prefer click. That way, I can move my mouse about without worrying I'm going to lose the information in the panel.

You can then combine the morphology with the lexicons definition of the lemma, and hopefully that will tell you enough about the word for you to have a good understanding of what it means. In this case, you know ἁγιαζόμενοι is a form of ἁγιάζω (which means 'to sanctify'), it's in the present tense, it's a passive (so it's done to you, not by you) and a participle (which means it has characteristics of both a noun and a verb).

So the English translation will be "makes [people] holy", or "sanctifies [people]". The word 'people' isn't necessary, but it's implied by the passive, and some translations add it to make sure we understand the verb is talking about making others holy.

Does that help? If not, feel free to ask follow-up questions.

PS - I personally wouldn't buy a book of Greek Grammar just yet, certainly not one that says "beyond the basics"! Hopefully these tools will help you with the basics, and you can progress later if you want to.

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