Verbum Tip 4ah: Bible Browser: Intertext

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Posted: Sat, Dec 19 2020 12:58 PM

Docx files for personal book: Verbum 9 part 1How to use the Verbum Lectionary and Missal

Please be generous with your additional details, corrections, suggestions, and other feedback. This is being built in a .docx file for a PBB which will be shared periodically.

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Facet: Intertext

Relevant resources:

  • Jones, David A. 2009. Old Testament Quotations and Allusions in the New Testament. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software. (in Bible Harmony format)
  • Beale, G. K. 2012. Handbook on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament: Exegesis and Interpretation. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic.
  • Beale, G. K., and D. A. Carson. 2007. Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament. Grand Rapids, MI;  Nottingham, UK: Baker Academic;  Apollos.

Dataset

  • DB:SD-NT-USE-OF-OT NT-USE-OF-OT.lbssd
  • DB:SD-NONCANONICAL-INTERTEXTS NONCANONICAL-INTERTEXTS.lbssd

Documentation

  • “About” in Jackson, Jeffrey Glen, ed. 2015. New Testament Use of the Old Testament. Bellingham, WA: Faithlife.
  • Brannan, Rick. 2017. Noncanonical Texts’ Use of the Bible: Dataset Documentation. Bellingham, WA: Faithlife.

Data

Canonical

From “About”:

Noncanonical

From the documentation:

Structure

Each Intertext label includes some combination of the following attributes:

•  Relationship: The intertextual relationship between the canonical and noncanonical references.

•  Citation: An explicit reference to scripture with a citation formula (e.g. “It is written,” or “the Lord says,” or “the prophet says,” or something along those lines).

•  Quotation: A direct reference to scripture, largely matching the verbatim wording of the canonical source but without a citation formula.

•  Allusion: An indirect but intentional reference to scripture, but likely intended to invoke memory of the scripture.

•  Echo: A verbal parallel evokes or recalls a scripture (or series of scriptures) to the reader, but likely without authorial intention to reproduce exact words.

•  Corpus: The noncanonical corpora analyzed and curated for this dataset include:

•  Apostolic Fathers

•  Dead Sea Scrolls Sectarian Material

•  Old Testament Pseudepigrapha

•  Nag Hammadi Codices

•  New Testament Apocrypha

•  Works of Josephus

•  Works of Philo

•  Source: The canonical (Biblical) source of the intertextual relationship

•  Target: The noncanonical reference that is in intertextual relationship with the canonical text[1]

This dataset is built off data in the Ancient Literature Dataset.

Faithlife Assistant

The Faithlife Assistant is opened from the Command Box with “Show Faithlife Assistant” or by the selection of Tool à Utilities à Faithlife Assistant. In the three examples below, I have entered text into the “Ask something“ box at the bottom of the panel rather than using speech as would be the usual practice.

 

 

Bible Browser

Intertext Source in the Bible Browser is limited to Biblical texts i.e. only the New Testament Use of the Old Testament data is available.

Filtering by:

  • Intertext à Relationship: Citation
  • Intertext à Source: Isaiah

Interactive

  • Jackson, Jeffrey Glen, ed. 2015. New Testament Use of the Old Testament. Bellingham, WA: Faithlife.
  • Documentation under “About”

Duplicating the Bible Browser filtering results in a different count (61 vs. 67).

Setup:

  • Chose translation (A) which defaults to your highest priority Bible.
  • Toggle to show/not show original language text (B)
  • Facets with their values to select (C)
    • Type
    • Book (NT)
    • Book (Source)
    • Speaker (NT)
    • Speaker (Source)
    • Addressee (NT)
    • Addressee (Source)
    • Literary Types (NT)
    • Literary Types (Source)
    • People (NT)
    • People (Source)
    • Places (NT)
    • Places (Source)
    • Things (NT)
    • Things (Source)
    • (Preaching) Themes (NT)
    • (Preaching) Themes (Source)
    • Sort of facet values (D) may be set “By Count” which is traditional or “A-Z”

Example:

  • Bread crumb (1) for facet selection:
    • Type: Citation
    • Book (Source): Isaiah
    • Choice of sequence (2) – New Testament reference in canonical order or Source (Old Testament) reference in canonical order.
    • Under the New Testament and source references:
      • Selected translation (3)
      • Greek New Testament (4)
      • Hebrew Old Testament (5)
      • Greek Old Testament i.e.LXX (6)

Context Menu and Information Panel

The Information Panel for the source text is unlike previous labels in that there are several entries, five to be precise. These include two corpuses – Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and New Testament:

A similar look at the Target: Matthew 1:23 shows more entries (9) and more corpuses – Old Testament Pseudepigrapha, Nag Hammadi Codices, New Testament. Note that while there may be multiple relationships, only one appears in the information panel.

The Context Menu reflects the same multiple Intertext entries – with copy reference and search functions but no option to open the target or source texts.

Search

From Verbum Help:

Interactive Dataset Labels

The following labels are typically delivered as supplemental datasets that accompany or mirror interactives.

Intertext Labels

The dataset behind the New Testament Use of the Old Testament interactive identifies when one text directly relates to another. The Intertext label is comprised of:

•     Corpus ~ "New Testament" — This Corpus is currently always New Testament.

•     Relationship ~ "..." — Speaks to how the two texts are connected.

•    Citation — An explicit reference to Scripture with a citation formula (e.g. “It is written,” or “the Lord says,” or “the prophet says”).

•    Quotation — A direct reference to Scripture, and is largely matching the verbatim wording of the source but without a quotation formula.

•    Allusion —  An indirect but intentional reference to Scripture that is likely intended to invoke memory of the Scripture.

•    Echo — A verbal parallel evokes or recalls a Scripture (or series of Scriptures) to the reader, but likely without authorial intention to reproduce exact words.

•     Source ~ <Bible ...> OR Target ~ <Bible ...> — Both expect a Bible reference;  "Source" specifies the text referring to another text, and "Target" is the text being referred to.

For example:

•     {Label Intertext WHERE Corpus ~ "New Testament" AND Relationship ~ "Citation" AND Source ~ <Is 40:3>}

•     {Label Intertext WHERE Corpus ~ "New Testament" AND Relationship ~ "Citation" AND Target ~ <Mt 3:3>}[2]

The first Intertext Label for Matthew 1:23 yields a search argument of {Label Intertext WHERE Corpus ~ "Nag Hammadi Codices" AND Relationship ~ "Allusion" AND Target ~ <NagHammadiCodices NHC II 3, 71:18–19>}. Yes, the datatype reference for a non-Biblical reference is new and needs a full explanation tomorrow.

The fifth Intertext label for Matthew 1:23 generates the somewhat uninteresting search argument {Label Intertext WHERE Corpus ~ "New Testament" AND Relationship ~ "Citation" AND Source ~ <Is 7:14>} with this result.

The final intertext label for Matthew 1:23 and the final example generates the search argument {Label Intertext WHERE Corpus ~ "Old Testament Pseudepigrapha" AND Relationship ~ "Allusion" AND Target ~ <Pseudepigrapha Testament of Solomon 15.11>}. In this case, run a basic search which will select many bibles and some commentaries.



[1] Rick Brannan, Noncanonical Texts’ Use of the Bible: Dataset Documentation (Bellingham, WA: Faithlife, 2017).

[2] Verbum Help (Bellingham, WA: Faithlife, 2018).

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