Word study - how to know which greek version?

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David Uebergang | Forum Activity | Posted: Sun, Feb 28 2021 4:44 PM

Hi,

I'm doing a word study for a greek assignment, and I have to show which version of the greek I'm using. How do I find that info?

For example, if I display the word study results in ESV, how do I know if it's sbl or NA?

Thank you!

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Feb 28 2021 5:53 PM

If you are asking about the Bible Word Study Guide, the answer varies by section. If your are asking about the Workflow, I would expect it to also vary by section.

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Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Feb 28 2021 6:02 PM

David Uebergang:
For example, if I display the word study results in ESV, how do I know if it's sbl or NA?

Thread => ESV Interlinear Using What Greek Text? includes Faithlife reply

Bradley Grainger (Faithlife):

The ESV is aligned to the SBLGNT text. It does not take into account the ESV translators' choices to use alternate readings.

Thread => Error in search for <Lemma = lbs/el/εἰρήνη> in Bibles with Reverse Interlinears includes Faithlife reply

Andrew Batishko (Faithlife):

This is not a bug. The reverse interlinear data (original language information) for most Bibles is based on the SBLGNT for the New Testament, and the LHB for the Old Testament. The lemma in question doesn't appear in that verse in the SBLGNT.

followed by subsequent Faithlife reply that included:

Bradley Grainger (Faithlife):

Lee Patmore:
Why are the reverse interlinear bibles not based on the Greek text that actually stands behind them?
 

I'm not an expert on this, but my understanding is that those Greek texts aren't actually available. Each translation ends up being based on its own eclectic Greek text as the translation committee chooses different readings during the translation process, and only the major differences tend to be documented in translators' footnotes. (Sometimes the underlying Greek text is made available, as with Goodrich & Lukaszewski's A Reader's Greek New Testament, or Scrivener's GNT, but I believe both of those were "reverse engineered" back from the English translation, and not a product of the translation committee.)

 

We do not have the budget (or omniscience) to reconstruct each conjectural underlying Greek text from the English (or Spanish, German, etc.) translation as part of the reverse interlinear alignment process, so for simplicity we align everything to either the SBLGNT or TR based on the manuscript tradition the translation uses. This is just something to be aware of when performing Greek studies on a reverse interlinear: for the most part, you're studying the SBLGNT.

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David Uebergang | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Feb 28 2021 7:24 PM

Fantastic, just what I was after! Thank you kindly.

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Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 1 2021 11:37 AM

Logos Blog has SBLGNT article => https://blog.logos.com/pastors-use-different-greek-text/ 10 May 2017, which includes apparatus insights.

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