John, 2nd ed. (Tyndale New Testament Commentaries | TNTC)

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Paul Caneparo | Forum Activity | Posted: Fri, Mar 12 2021 10:55 AM

Has anyone used and compared this volume with the original?

I may purchase the Tyndale commentary set in the March Matchups sale. I'm only missing 3 volumes so it will only be $11. However, I was disappointed by Kruse's Pillar update as there was very little new content.

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Graham Criddle | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 12 2021 11:33 AM

I haven't compared them but, in Logos, the original has 389 pages and the 2nd edition has 467

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Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 12 2021 2:00 PM

Paul Caneparo:
However, I was disappointed by Kruse's Pillar update as there was very little new content.

It is an up date by the same author (Kruse). The organisation has been extended with additional sub-headings. The Comments are slightly longer (some shorter!), giving an overall longer commentary.

You may be disappointed by this update as well.

Dave
===

Windows 10 & Android 8

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Paul Caneparo | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Mar 12 2021 11:14 PM

Thanks for the 2 replies. I think I'll resist despite the great price. Karen Jones has a John commentary out next month and I think I'll out the money towards that.

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David Thomas | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Mar 13 2021 11:36 AM

Paul Caneparo:
Has anyone used and compared this volume with the original?

ORIGINAL

E. The coming of the Word into the world (1:14)

This fifth paragraph (c1) balances the third paragraph (c), and explains how the Word came into the world: The Word became flesh. He entered the world by becoming flesh (sarx), i.e. by becoming human. The Word did not cease to be the Word, but in the incarnation he changed his mode of being the Word. How the Word who ‘was God’ could become human is not explained. This became the subject of much debate in the early centuries of the church. However, the evangelist was not interested in explaining how the Word became human. He was more concerned to explain what the consequences of this were. The first of these was that he made his dwelling among us. The expression ‘made his dwelling’ translates one word (eskēnōsen), which, rendered literally, means ‘pitched a tent’ or ‘tabernacled’. The allusion is to the time when God’s presence was localized in the tabernacle in the midst of the camp of Israel (Exod. 40:34–38). The evangelist is saying that the Word becoming flesh and living among us is like God tabernacling among the tribes of Israel, or, put in other words, the presence of God was localized in Jesus the incarnate Word.
The second consequence of the Word becoming human is that the evangelist could say we have seen his glory. The reference to ‘glory’ is also an allusion to God’s presence in the tabernacle. Exodus 40:34–35 tells us that when Moses completed the construction of the tabernacle, ‘Then the cloud covered the Tent of Meeting, and the glory of the Lord filled the tabernacle. Moses could not enter the Tent of Meeting because the cloud had settled upon it, and the glory of the Lord filled the tabernacle.’ As the glory of God was once present in the tabernacle, so it was now present in the Word made flesh. Moreover, the evangelist, including himself among the eyewitnesses, says ‘we have seen his glory’, and then describes two aspects of the glory they saw. First, it was the glory of the One and Only, who came from the Father. He uses a special word (monogenēs) when he describes the Word as ‘the One and Only’. It stresses the uniqueness of the Word who came from the Father (see Additional note: Monogenēs, pp. 71–72). The evangelist indicates here, as he stresses repeatedly throughout the Gospel, that this unique one whose glory they saw came ‘from the Father’ into the world (5:36, 37, 43; 6:42, 57; 8:16, 18, 42; 12:49; 13:3; 14:24; 16:28; 17:21, 25; 20:21). He was the one who came ‘from above’ (3:31) and as such was the only one who could make the Father known (18).
Second, the glory the eyewitnesses saw was full of grace and truth. The expression ‘grace and truth’ (charis kai alētheia) is found only twice in the NT, here and in 1:17. It is almost certainly the evanglist’s rendering of a similar expression ‘kindness and faithfulness’ (eleos kai alētheia) that is used frequently in the LXX as a translation of the Hebrew expression ḥesed we’ĕmet (e.g. Josh. 2:14; 2 Sam. 2:6; 15:20; Pss. 24:10 [ET 25:10]; 60:8 [ET 61:7]; 83:12 [ET 84:11]; 84:11 [ET 85:10]; 88:15 [ET 89:14]). The expression is used in Exodus 34:6–7, a passage in which God makes his glory known to Moses: ‘And he passed in front of Moses, proclaiming, “The LORD, the LORD, the compassionate and gracious God, slow to anger, abounding in love and faithfulness (ḥesed we’ĕmet), maintaining love to thousands, and forgiving wickedness, rebellion and sin.” ’ The ‘love and faithfulness’ that constituted the glory of God proclaimed to Moses is now found in the Word incarnate. What was proclaimed to Moses by the Lord as he passed by has now been seen, embodied in the incarnate Word, by the eye-witnesses.
The word ‘grace’ (charis), which the evangelist uses as his equivalent for the Hebrew, ḥesed, is found in only three places in John, all of them in the Prologue (14, 16, 17), and all of them in descriptions of the Word become flesh. Central to the glory of God revealed in the incarnate Word is his grace. As the Gospel of John unfolds, the grace of the Word incarnate in Jesus is seen again and again: he provides abundance of wine at the wedding feast of Cana (2:1–12), heals the official’s son (4:43–54), causes the lame man at the Pool of Bethesda to walk (5:19–30), feeds the five thousand (6:1–15), gives sight to the man born blind (9:1–6), and restores Lazarus to life (11:38–44). His grace is seen most importantly in laying down his life for his people (10:11, 15), in giving eternal life (4:14; 6:27; 10:28; 17:2) and sending the Holy Spirit to those who believe (15:26; 16:7).
The Hebrew word ’ĕmet, for which the evangelist substitutes the Greek word alētheia, translated ‘truth’, has the root meaning of ‘reliability’. God is reliable both in his words and actions. He can be depended upon to carry out what he promises, and his words are always true. When the evangelist says the Word incarnate was ‘full of grace and truth’, he is affirming that the reliability of action and word predicated of God may also be predicated of the Word. The Word is reliable and truthful, he speaks the truth (8:45–46), testifies to the truth (18:37), and embodies the truth about God and his plan for salvation (14:6).


Colin G. Kruse, John: An Introduction and Commentary, vol. 4, Tyndale New Testament Commentaries (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2003).


Exported from Logos Bible Software, 1:33 PM March 13, 2021.

REVISED

E. The coming of the Word into the world (1:14)

This fifth paragraph (c′) balances the third paragraph (c) and explains how the Word came into the world: The Word became flesh. As Köstenberger explains, the word ‘became’

does not mean ‘changed into’ in the sense that Jesus, by becoming human, ceased to be God. Nor does it mean ‘appeared’ human … or even ‘took on’ humanity … The main point is that God now has chosen to be with his people in a more personal way than ever before.

The Word did not cease to be the Word, but in the incarnation he changed his mode of being the Word. How the Word who ‘was God’ could become human is not explained. This became the subject of debate in the early centuries of the church. However, the evangelist was not interested in explaining how the Word became human. He was more concerned to explain what the consequences of this were. The first of these was that he made his dwelling among us. The expression made his dwelling translates one word, eskēnōsen, which, rendered literally, means ‘pitched a tent’ or ‘encamped’. The allusion is to the time when God’s presence was localized in the tabernacle in the midst of the camp of Israel (cf. Exod. 40:34–38). The evangelist is saying that the Word becoming flesh and living among us is like God ‘encamping’ among the tribes of Israel. Revelation 21:3 depicts the ultimate blessing of believers thus: ‘And I heard a loud voice from the throne saying, “Look! God’s dwelling-place is now among the people, and he will dwell [skēnōsei] with them. They will be his people, and God himself will be with them and be their God.’
The second consequence of the Word becoming flesh is that the evangelist could say, We have seen his glory. The reference to glory is also an allusion to God’s presence in the tabernacle. Exodus 40:34–35 tells us that when Moses completed the construction of the tabernacle,

Then the cloud covered the tent of meeting, and the glory of the LORD filled the tabernacle. Moses could not enter the tent of meeting because the cloud had settled on it, and the glory of the LORD filled the tabernacle.

As the glory of God was once present in the tabernacle, so it was now present in the Word made flesh.
Moreover, the evangelist, including himself among the eyewitnesses, says We have seen his glory, and then describes two aspects of the glory they saw. First, it was the glory of the one and only Son, who came from the Father. He uses a special word (monogenēs) when describing the Word as the one and only. It stresses the uniqueness of the Word who came from the Father (see ‘Additional note: monogenēs’, pp. 65–66). The evangelist indicates here, as he stresses repeatedly throughout the Gospel, that this unique one whose glory they saw came from the Father into the world (cf. 5:36, 37, 43; 6:42, 57; 8:16, 18, 42; 12:49; 13:3; 14:24; 16:28; 17:21, 25; 20:21). He was the one ‘from above’ (3:31) and as such was the only one who could make the Father known (1:18).
Second, the glory the eyewitnesses saw was full of grace and truth. The expression ‘grace and truth’ (charis kai alētheia) is found only twice in the New Testament: here and in 1:17. It is almost certainly the evangelist’s rendering of a similar expression, ‘kindness and faithfulness’ (eleos kai alētheia), which is used often in the LXX as a translation of the Hebrew expression ḥesed wĕ’ĕmet (cf. e.g. Josh. 2:14; 2 Sam. 2:6; 15:20; Pss 24:10 [ET 25:10]; 60:8 [ET 61:7]; 83:12 [ET 84:11]; 84:11 [ET 85:10]; 88:15 [ET 89:14]). The expression is used in Exodus 34:6–7, a passage in which God makes his glory known to Moses: ‘And he passed in front of Moses, proclaiming, “The LORD, the LORD, the compassionate and gracious God, slow to anger, abounding in love and faithfulness [ḥesed wĕ’ĕmet], maintaining love to thousands, and forgiving wickedness, rebellion and sin.’ The ‘love and faithfulness’ which constituted the glory of God proclaimed to Moses is now found in the Word incarnate. What was proclaimed to Moses by the Lord as he passed by has now been seen, embodied in the incarnate Word, by the eyewitnesses.
The word ‘grace’ (charis), which the evangelist uses as his equivalent for the Hebrew ḥesed, is found in only three places in John, all in the prologue (1:14, 16, 17) and all of them in descriptions of the Word become flesh. Central to the glory of God revealed in the incarnate Word is his grace: his favour towards people and his loving action in providing for their needs, most importantly in effecting salvation for them. As the Gospel of John unfolds, this grace is seen again and again; for example, Jesus provides abundance of wine at the wedding feast of Cana (2:1–12), heals the official’s son (4:43–54), causes the lame man at the Pool of Bethesda to walk (5:1–15), feeds the five thousand (6:1–15), gives sight to the man born blind (9:1–7) and restores Lazarus to life (11:38–44). His grace is seen most importantly in his laying down his life for his people (10:11, 15), in giving them eternal life (4:14; 6:27; 10:28; 17:2) and in sending them the Holy Spirit (15:26; 16:7).
The Hebrew word ’ĕmet, for which the evangelist substitutes the Greek word alētheia, translated truth, has the root meaning of reliability. God is reliable in both his words and his actions. He can be depended upon to carry out what he promises, and his words are always true. When the evangelist says the Word incarnate was full of … truth, he is affirming that the reliability of action and word predicated of God may also be predicated of the Word. The Word is reliable and truthful, he speaks the truth (8:45–46), testifies to the truth (18:37) and embodies the truth about God and his plan for salvation (14:6).


Additional note: monogenēs

The word monogenēs, rendered ‘the one and only Son’ in 1:14 in the NIV, is in some other translations rendered ‘only begotten’. That the word should be translated as ‘the one and only Son’ is confirmed by its usage elsewhere in the New Testament, where it is found a total of nine times. It is found three times in the Gospel of Luke: once to describe the ‘only son’ of the widow of Nain (Luke 7:12), once to describe the ‘only daughter’ of Jairus (Luke 8:42) and once to describe the ‘only child’ of the man who sought Jesus’ help for his demon-possessed boy (Luke 9:38). It is found once in Hebrews where Isaac, whom Abraham was about to sacrifice, is described as his ‘one and only’ son (Heb. 11:17)—in Abraham’s case, his one and only son by Sarah. In each case the expression is used to add poignancy to a story by highlighting the fact that it was the person’s ‘one and only’ child who was in dire need, was threatened or had died. The stress is not upon the fact that the person was begotten/born of the father or mother concerned, but upon the fact that the father or mother had only one child and that child was the one who was so sadly affected. It is found once in 1 John 4:9, where the author emphasizes the fact that the one whom God sent into the world was his ‘one and only’ Son. Once again the emphasis is not that Jesus was ‘begotten’ of God, but that God had only one Son, and this ‘one and only’ Son he sent into the world that ‘we might live through him’.
In the Gospel of John monogenēs is used in three other places and in each case it is used in relation to Jesus as God’s Son. In 1:18 we are told that ‘No one has ever seen God, but the one and only Son [monogenēs], who is himself God and is in the closest relationship with the Father, has made him known’. And in 3:16 we find: ‘For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only [ton monogenē] Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.’ Finally, in 3:18 we read: ‘whoever does not believe stands condemned already because they have not believed in the name of God’s one and only [monogenous] Son.’ In each case monogenēs denotes, not that the Son was ‘begotten’ of the Father, but rather his uniqueness as the ‘one and only’ Son of God.


Colin G. Kruse, John: An Introduction and Commentary, ed. Eckhard J. Schnabel, Second edition., vol. 4, Tyndale New Testament Commentaries (London: Inter-Varsity Press, 2017).


Exported from Logos Bible Software, 1:34 PM March 13, 2021.

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Jan Krohn | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Mar 13 2021 12:29 PM

Btw, this commentary is included in Logos 9 Silver. If you plan to upgrade anyway, then there's no need to get the commentary now, especially if there are so many other attractive deals.

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Paul Caneparo | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Mar 13 2021 10:57 PM

David Thomas:

Paul Caneparo:
Has anyone used and compared this volume with the original?

ORIGINAL

E. The coming of the Word into the world (1:14)

This fifth paragraph (c1) balances the third paragraph (c), and explains how the Word came into the world: The Word became flesh. He entered the world by becoming flesh (sarx), i.e. by becoming human. The Word did not cease to be the Word, but in the incarnation he changed his mode of being the Word. How the Word who ‘was God’ could become human is not explained. This became the subject of much debate in the early centuries of the church. However, the evangelist was not interested in explaining how the Word became human. He was more concerned to explain what the consequences of this were. The first of these was that he made his dwelling among us. The expression ‘made his dwelling’ translates one word (eskēnōsen), which, rendered literally, means ‘pitched a tent’ or ‘tabernacled’. The allusion is to the time when God’s presence was localized in the tabernacle in the midst of the camp of Israel (Exod. 40:34–38). The evangelist is saying that the Word becoming flesh and living among us is like God tabernacling among the tribes of Israel, or, put in other words, the presence of God was localized in Jesus the incarnate Word.
The second consequence of the Word becoming human is that the evangelist could say we have seen his glory. The reference to ‘glory’ is also an allusion to God’s presence in the tabernacle. Exodus 40:34–35 tells us that when Moses completed the construction of the tabernacle, ‘Then the cloud covered the Tent of Meeting, and the glory of the Lord filled the tabernacle. Moses could not enter the Tent of Meeting because the cloud had settled upon it, and the glory of the Lord filled the tabernacle.’ As the glory of God was once present in the tabernacle, so it was now present in the Word made flesh. Moreover, the evangelist, including himself among the eyewitnesses, says ‘we have seen his glory’, and then describes two aspects of the glory they saw. First, it was the glory of the One and Only, who came from the Father. He uses a special word (monogenēs) when he describes the Word as ‘the One and Only’. It stresses the uniqueness of the Word who came from the Father (see Additional note: Monogenēs, pp. 71–72). The evangelist indicates here, as he stresses repeatedly throughout the Gospel, that this unique one whose glory they saw came ‘from the Father’ into the world (5:36, 37, 43; 6:42, 57; 8:16, 18, 42; 12:49; 13:3; 14:24; 16:28; 17:21, 25; 20:21). He was the one who came ‘from above’ (3:31) and as such was the only one who could make the Father known (18).
Second, the glory the eyewitnesses saw was full of grace and truth. The expression ‘grace and truth’ (charis kai alētheia) is found only twice in the NT, here and in 1:17. It is almost certainly the evanglist’s rendering of a similar expression ‘kindness and faithfulness’ (eleos kai alētheia) that is used frequently in the LXX as a translation of the Hebrew expression ḥesed we’ĕmet (e.g. Josh. 2:14; 2 Sam. 2:6; 15:20; Pss. 24:10 [ET 25:10]; 60:8 [ET 61:7]; 83:12 [ET 84:11]; 84:11 [ET 85:10]; 88:15 [ET 89:14]). The expression is used in Exodus 34:6–7, a passage in which God makes his glory known to Moses: ‘And he passed in front of Moses, proclaiming, “The LORD, the LORD, the compassionate and gracious God, slow to anger, abounding in love and faithfulness (ḥesed we’ĕmet), maintaining love to thousands, and forgiving wickedness, rebellion and sin.” ’ The ‘love and faithfulness’ that constituted the glory of God proclaimed to Moses is now found in the Word incarnate. What was proclaimed to Moses by the Lord as he passed by has now been seen, embodied in the incarnate Word, by the eye-witnesses.
The word ‘grace’ (charis), which the evangelist uses as his equivalent for the Hebrew, ḥesed, is found in only three places in John, all of them in the Prologue (14, 16, 17), and all of them in descriptions of the Word become flesh. Central to the glory of God revealed in the incarnate Word is his grace. As the Gospel of John unfolds, the grace of the Word incarnate in Jesus is seen again and again: he provides abundance of wine at the wedding feast of Cana (2:1–12), heals the official’s son (4:43–54), causes the lame man at the Pool of Bethesda to walk (5:19–30), feeds the five thousand (6:1–15), gives sight to the man born blind (9:1–6), and restores Lazarus to life (11:38–44). His grace is seen most importantly in laying down his life for his people (10:11, 15), in giving eternal life (4:14; 6:27; 10:28; 17:2) and sending the Holy Spirit to those who believe (15:26; 16:7).
The Hebrew word ’ĕmet, for which the evangelist substitutes the Greek word alētheia, translated ‘truth’, has the root meaning of ‘reliability’. God is reliable both in his words and actions. He can be depended upon to carry out what he promises, and his words are always true. When the evangelist says the Word incarnate was ‘full of grace and truth’, he is affirming that the reliability of action and word predicated of God may also be predicated of the Word. The Word is reliable and truthful, he speaks the truth (8:45–46), testifies to the truth (18:37), and embodies the truth about God and his plan for salvation (14:6).


Colin G. Kruse, John: An Introduction and Commentary, vol. 4, Tyndale New Testament Commentaries (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2003).


Exported from Logos Bible Software, 1:33 PM March 13, 2021.

REVISED

E. The coming of the Word into the world (1:14)

This fifth paragraph (c′) balances the third paragraph (c) and explains how the Word came into the world: The Word became flesh. As Köstenberger explains, the word ‘became’

does not mean ‘changed into’ in the sense that Jesus, by becoming human, ceased to be God. Nor does it mean ‘appeared’ human … or even ‘took on’ humanity … The main point is that God now has chosen to be with his people in a more personal way than ever before.

The Word did not cease to be the Word, but in the incarnation he changed his mode of being the Word. How the Word who ‘was God’ could become human is not explained. This became the subject of debate in the early centuries of the church. However, the evangelist was not interested in explaining how the Word became human. He was more concerned to explain what the consequences of this were. The first of these was that he made his dwelling among us. The expression made his dwelling translates one word, eskēnōsen, which, rendered literally, means ‘pitched a tent’ or ‘encamped’. The allusion is to the time when God’s presence was localized in the tabernacle in the midst of the camp of Israel (cf. Exod. 40:34–38). The evangelist is saying that the Word becoming flesh and living among us is like God ‘encamping’ among the tribes of Israel. Revelation 21:3 depicts the ultimate blessing of believers thus: ‘And I heard a loud voice from the throne saying, “Look! God’s dwelling-place is now among the people, and he will dwell [skēnōsei] with them. They will be his people, and God himself will be with them and be their God.’
The second consequence of the Word becoming flesh is that the evangelist could say, We have seen his glory. The reference to glory is also an allusion to God’s presence in the tabernacle. Exodus 40:34–35 tells us that when Moses completed the construction of the tabernacle,

Then the cloud covered the tent of meeting, and the glory of the LORD filled the tabernacle. Moses could not enter the tent of meeting because the cloud had settled on it, and the glory of the LORD filled the tabernacle.

As the glory of God was once present in the tabernacle, so it was now present in the Word made flesh.
Moreover, the evangelist, including himself among the eyewitnesses, says We have seen his glory, and then describes two aspects of the glory they saw. First, it was the glory of the one and only Son, who came from the Father. He uses a special word (monogenēs) when describing the Word as the one and only. It stresses the uniqueness of the Word who came from the Father (see ‘Additional note: monogenēs’, pp. 65–66). The evangelist indicates here, as he stresses repeatedly throughout the Gospel, that this unique one whose glory they saw came from the Father into the world (cf. 5:36, 37, 43; 6:42, 57; 8:16, 18, 42; 12:49; 13:3; 14:24; 16:28; 17:21, 25; 20:21). He was the one ‘from above’ (3:31) and as such was the only one who could make the Father known (1:18).
Second, the glory the eyewitnesses saw was full of grace and truth. The expression ‘grace and truth’ (charis kai alētheia) is found only twice in the New Testament: here and in 1:17. It is almost certainly the evangelist’s rendering of a similar expression, ‘kindness and faithfulness’ (eleos kai alētheia), which is used often in the LXX as a translation of the Hebrew expression ḥesed wĕ’ĕmet (cf. e.g. Josh. 2:14; 2 Sam. 2:6; 15:20; Pss 24:10 [ET 25:10]; 60:8 [ET 61:7]; 83:12 [ET 84:11]; 84:11 [ET 85:10]; 88:15 [ET 89:14]). The expression is used in Exodus 34:6–7, a passage in which God makes his glory known to Moses: ‘And he passed in front of Moses, proclaiming, “The LORD, the LORD, the compassionate and gracious God, slow to anger, abounding in love and faithfulness [ḥesed wĕ’ĕmet], maintaining love to thousands, and forgiving wickedness, rebellion and sin.’ The ‘love and faithfulness’ which constituted the glory of God proclaimed to Moses is now found in the Word incarnate. What was proclaimed to Moses by the Lord as he passed by has now been seen, embodied in the incarnate Word, by the eyewitnesses.
The word ‘grace’ (charis), which the evangelist uses as his equivalent for the Hebrew ḥesed, is found in only three places in John, all in the prologue (1:14, 16, 17) and all of them in descriptions of the Word become flesh. Central to the glory of God revealed in the incarnate Word is his grace: his favour towards people and his loving action in providing for their needs, most importantly in effecting salvation for them. As the Gospel of John unfolds, this grace is seen again and again; for example, Jesus provides abundance of wine at the wedding feast of Cana (2:1–12), heals the official’s son (4:43–54), causes the lame man at the Pool of Bethesda to walk (5:1–15), feeds the five thousand (6:1–15), gives sight to the man born blind (9:1–7) and restores Lazarus to life (11:38–44). His grace is seen most importantly in his laying down his life for his people (10:11, 15), in giving them eternal life (4:14; 6:27; 10:28; 17:2) and in sending them the Holy Spirit (15:26; 16:7).
The Hebrew word ’ĕmet, for which the evangelist substitutes the Greek word alētheia, translated truth, has the root meaning of reliability. God is reliable in both his words and his actions. He can be depended upon to carry out what he promises, and his words are always true. When the evangelist says the Word incarnate was full of … truth, he is affirming that the reliability of action and word predicated of God may also be predicated of the Word. The Word is reliable and truthful, he speaks the truth (8:45–46), testifies to the truth (18:37) and embodies the truth about God and his plan for salvation (14:6).


Additional note: monogenēs

The word monogenēs, rendered ‘the one and only Son’ in 1:14 in the NIV, is in some other translations rendered ‘only begotten’. That the word should be translated as ‘the one and only Son’ is confirmed by its usage elsewhere in the New Testament, where it is found a total of nine times. It is found three times in the Gospel of Luke: once to describe the ‘only son’ of the widow of Nain (Luke 7:12), once to describe the ‘only daughter’ of Jairus (Luke 8:42) and once to describe the ‘only child’ of the man who sought Jesus’ help for his demon-possessed boy (Luke 9:38). It is found once in Hebrews where Isaac, whom Abraham was about to sacrifice, is described as his ‘one and only’ son (Heb. 11:17)—in Abraham’s case, his one and only son by Sarah. In each case the expression is used to add poignancy to a story by highlighting the fact that it was the person’s ‘one and only’ child who was in dire need, was threatened or had died. The stress is not upon the fact that the person was begotten/born of the father or mother concerned, but upon the fact that the father or mother had only one child and that child was the one who was so sadly affected. It is found once in 1 John 4:9, where the author emphasizes the fact that the one whom God sent into the world was his ‘one and only’ Son. Once again the emphasis is not that Jesus was ‘begotten’ of God, but that God had only one Son, and this ‘one and only’ Son he sent into the world that ‘we might live through him’.
In the Gospel of John monogenēs is used in three other places and in each case it is used in relation to Jesus as God’s Son. In 1:18 we are told that ‘No one has ever seen God, but the one and only Son [monogenēs], who is himself God and is in the closest relationship with the Father, has made him known’. And in 3:16 we find: ‘For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only [ton monogenē] Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.’ Finally, in 3:18 we read: ‘whoever does not believe stands condemned already because they have not believed in the name of God’s one and only [monogenous] Son.’ In each case monogenēs denotes, not that the Son was ‘begotten’ of the Father, but rather his uniqueness as the ‘one and only’ Son of God.


Colin G. Kruse, John: An Introduction and Commentary, ed. Eckhard J. Schnabel, Second edition., vol. 4, Tyndale New Testament Commentaries (London: Inter-Varsity Press, 2017).


Exported from Logos Bible Software, 1:34 PM March 13, 2021.

Thanks David. I note the monogenēs Additional note exists in the original too, so the difference is quite marginal.

Posts 1721
Paul Caneparo | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Mar 13 2021 11:00 PM

Jan Krohn:

Btw, this commentary is included in Logos 9 Silver. If you plan to upgrade anyway, then there's no need to get the commentary now, especially if there are so many other attractive deals.

Thanks. I have the Waltke abridged Proverbs commentary on pre-order. That's released on 23rd March. I'll see if I like that before then deciding if I go for the Tyndale set as the other 2 volumes I don't currently have in Tyndale are the revised Proverbs and Ecclesiastes ones.

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