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Formella, Jesse | Forum Activity | Posted: Sat, Jun 5 2021 11:39 AM

I have a question to ask? I think I understand but I want a confirmation on what I think is true. I don't want to assume that I know the tool just yet. I want to be absolutely sure. I really want to learn how to use the Bible Word Study tool properly. Let's say I take the Greek Lemma 'Teleios.' On the graph ring, it seperates it into different color coated sections. For example, it shows that 'Teleios' in English has a couple meanings which are 'perfect,' 'mature,' and 'full.' This means that Greek Lemma 'Teleios' means 'perfect,' 'mature,' and 'full' in English? For me to understand how the graph works, it is not enough to know just English because the Greek Lemma is rich and has more meanings in English? If I use the morph query, it will give me all the verses to the Greek Lemma 'Teleios' to those 3 English words. This means, I can see the context and a broader understanding for just one Greek Lemma?

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Graham Criddle | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jun 5 2021 2:27 PM

Hi Jesse - and welcome to the forums

Formella, Jesse:
Let's say I take the Greek Lemma 'Teleios.' On the graph ring, it seperates it into different color coated sections. For example, it shows that 'Teleios' in English has a couple meanings which are 'perfect,' 'mature,' and 'full.' This means that Greek Lemma 'Teleios' means 'perfect,' 'mature,' and 'full' in English?

Not exactly.

It actually means that this is how the word has been translated in the version you are looking it.

As below, this is how the ESV has translated the word:

Image



To change the translation, hover your cursor at the top right of that section and open the Settings menu. Then choose a different translation. As you can see the NIV, for example, has translated the word differently.

Image



To get more insight into the range of meanings of the word, you can consult your lexicons - in the lemma section above the translation ring

Formella, Jesse:
If I use the morph query, it will give me all the verses to the Greek Lemma 'Teleios' to those 3 English words. This means, I can see the context and a broader understanding for just one Greek Lemma?

You don't actually need a morph search for this, a Bible search (assuming you are using a translation with a reverse-interlinear) would do it as shown below:

Image

Does this help at all?

Graham

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