Verbum 9 Tip 9aq: Guide section: Visualizations: Discourse analysis

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Docx files for personal book: Verbum 9 part 1Verbum 9 part 2Verbum 9 part 3Verbum 9 part 4Verbum 9 part 5Verbum 9 part 6Verbum 9 part 7;  How to use the Verbum Lectionary and MissalVerbum 8 tips 1-30Verbum 8 tips 31-49

Reading lists: Catholic Bible Interpretation

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Some Logos documentation

On Discourse Analysis:

The Lexham Discourse Hebrew Bible (LDHB) dataset is a complete analysis of select discourse features in the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament). This dataset is the result of years of study on the discourse devices that add emphasis, contrast, and rhetorical meaning to words. The Lexham Discourse Hebrew Bible dataset includes annotation for the entire text of the Hebrew Bible with over 20 discourse features, making this a powerful tool for studying the Hebrew Old Testament.[1]

The Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament (LDGNT) dataset is a complete analysis of select discourse features in the Greek New Testament. This dataset is the result of years of study on the discourse devices that add emphasis, contrast, and rhetorical meaning to words. The Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament dataset includes annotation for the entire text of the Greek New Testament with over 20 discourse features, making this a powerful tool for studying the Greek New Testament.[2]

On High Definition:

When the writers of the Old Testament penned their messages, they chose their words carefully so as to convey a particular meaning. They also, however, used language to create certain effects—to build suspense, to gain the reader’s attention, to signal that something really important was about to happen, or to point out that certain ideas were more important than others. Unfortunately, this kind of information has only been accessible to people who devoted years to studying Hebrew.

The Lexham High-Definition Old Testament (HDOT) uses a totally new approach. It identifies the attention-getters, suspense-builders, emphasis words, and outlining signals used by the original writers, and labels them for you right in the text. Instead of listing them in study notes or a commentary, I have annotated them for you, providing a wealth of information that has never before been accessible to non-Hebrew scholars.

The Lexham High-Definition Old Testament is based on years of research by linguists and Bible translators into what types of language devices Old Testament writers used to signal readers. I applied those research findings to the Hebrew text of the Old Testament. Using the power of reverse-interlinear technology, we transferred the labels from the original Hebrew to the corresponding English words, providing an accurate representation of the original Hebrew analysis in the ESV text.[3]

When the biblical writers penned their message, they did not just use random words. They did things to get our attention, build suspense, to signal that something really important was about to happen, or that a certain ideas were more important than others. Unfortunately, this information has only been accessible to people who devoted years of study to Greek.

The Lexham High Definition New Testament uses a totally new approach. Instead of forcing you to do all the years of study, and to master all kinds of technical terminology, it identifies the attention-getters, suspense-builders, emphasized words and outlining signals that the original writers used, and labels them for you right in the text. Instead of just mentioning them in study notes or a commentary, they are annotated for you, giving you a wealth of information that has never been accessible before.

The Lexham High Definition New Testament is based on years of research done by linguists and Bible translators into what kinds of language devices are used to signal different things to readers. These ideas were then applied to the Greek text of the New Testament. Then, using the power of reverse-interlinear technology, the labels were transferred from the original Greek to the corresponding English words, providing an accurate representation of the original Greek analysis in the ESV text. [4]

 

On Propositional Outlines
:

Throughout the Bible’s history, its text has been displayed in a variety of ways. Early Hebrew manuscripts lacked vowel markings. Chapter and verse references were later additions to the biblical text. The Lexham Propositional Outlines of the Old Testament follow in this tradition of adapting the way the text is displayed. Specifically, these propositional outlines are intended to help the reader follow an Old Testament author’s flow of thought.

In what follows, a proposition is defined as the meaning of a sentence. Thus, these outlines break the text down into its meaning bearing sentences further subdividing them as deemed useful. In addition, the outlines include categorization to help users follow a biblical author’s flow of thought.[5]

Throughout the Bible’s history, its text has been displayed in a variety of ways. Greek manuscripts were often in uppercase with no spaces between letters. Chapter and verse references were later additions to the biblical text. The Lexham Propositional Outlines of the New Testament follow in this tradition of adapting the way the text is displayed. Specifically, these propositional outlines are intended to help the reader follow a New Testament author’s flow of thought.

In what follows, a proposition is defined as the meaning of a sentence. Thus, these outlines break the text down into its meaning bearing sentences further subdividing them as deemed useful. In addition, the outlines include categorization to help users follow a biblical author’s flow of thought.Devil

Some linguistic terminology

Contemporary linguistics: Discourse analysis

Discourse analysis (DA), or discourse studies, is an approach to the analysis of written, vocal, or sign language use, or any significant semiotic event.

The objects of discourse analysis (discourse, writing, conversation, communicative event) are variously defined in terms of coherent sequences of sentences, propositions, speech, or turns-at-talk. Contrary to much of traditional linguistics, discourse analysts not only study language use ‘beyond the sentence boundary’ but also prefer to analyze ‘naturally occurring’ language use, not invented examples. Text linguistics is a closely related field. The essential difference between discourse analysis and text linguistics is that discourse analysis aims at revealing socio-psychological characteristics of a person/persons rather than text structure.

Discourse analysis has been taken up in a variety of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences, including linguistics, education, sociology, anthropology, social work, cognitive psychology, social psychology, area studies, cultural studies, international relations, human geography, environmental science, communication studies, biblical studies, public relations, argumentation studies, and translation studies, each of which is subject to its own assumptions, dimensions of analysis, and methodologies.[7]

Contemporary linguistics: Pragmatics

In linguistics and related fields, pragmatics is the study of how context contributes to meaning. Pragmatics encompasses phenomena including implicature, speech acts, relevance and conversation. Theories of pragmatics go hand-in-hand with theories of semantics, which studies aspects of meaning which are grammatically or lexically encoded. The ability to understand another speaker's intended meaning is called pragmatic competence. Pragmatics emerged as its own subfield in the 1950s after the pioneering work of J.L. Austin and Paul Grice.Music

Contemporary linguistics: Text linguistics

Text linguistics is a branch of linguistics that deals with texts as communication systems. Its original aims lay in uncovering and describing text grammars. The application of text linguistics has, however, evolved from this approach to a point in which text is viewed in much broader terms that go beyond a mere extension of traditional grammar towards an entire text. Text linguistics takes into account the form of a text, but also its setting, i. e. the way in which it is situated in an interactional, communicative context. Both the author of a (written or spoken) text as well as its addressee are taken into consideration in their respective (social and/or institutional) roles in the specific communicative context. In general it is an application of discourse analysis at the much broader level of text, rather than just a sentence or word.[9]

Discourse analysis

The Visualization Guide shows a single resource for Discourse Analysis:

P23-1 Discourse Analysis

However, there is another means by which discourse analysis tagging is accessed – as a visual filter.

P23-2 Visual Filter

An excerpt from Runge, Steven E. The Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament. Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2008–2014.

P23-3 Discourse Bible

  1. Some discourse analysis tags are shown with tags on the left and both the tags and the text indented to show hierarchy.
  2. Other discourse analysis tags are shown by codes inserted into the text.
  3. Mouse over on discourse analysis tags show the relevant definition from Runge, Steven E. The Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament: Glossary. Lexham Press, 2008. Mouse over a text word provides definitions for the in-text-tags that apply as well as the gutter line morphological data.
  4. The standard gutter line data is supplemented by the in-text-tags that apply.

The discourse Bible compared to the NRSV with the discourse analysis filter:

P23-3 Discourse Bible

Some resources to see discourse analysis in action:

  • Porter, Stanley E., and Jeffrey T. Reed. Discourse Analysis and the New Testament: Approaches and Results. Vol. 170. Journal for the Study of the New Testament Supplement Series. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1999.
  • Runge, Steven E. Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction for Teaching and Exegesis. Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2010.
  • Reed, Jeffrey T. A Discourse Analysis of Philippians: Method and Rhetoric in the Debate over Literary Integrity. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1997.


[1] Lydia Husser, Lexham Discourse Hebrew Bible: Dataset Documentation (Bellingham, WA: Faithlife, 2016).

[2] Lydia Husser, Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament: Dataset Documentation (Bellingham, WA: Faithlife, 2016).

[3] Steven E. Runge and Joshua R. Westbury, eds., The Lexham High Definition Old Testament: Introduction (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2012).

[4] Steven E. Runge, The Lexham High Definition New Testament: Introduction (Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2008).

[5] Jeremy Thompson, Lexham Propositional Outlines of the Old Testament: Dataset Documentation (Bellingham, WA: Faithlife, 2015).

Devil Jeremy Thompson, Lexham Propositional Outlines of the New Testament: Dataset Documentation (Bellingham, WA: Faithlife, 2015).

[7] Discourse analysis - Wikipedia accessed 7/24/2021 2:54 AM

Music Pragmatics - Wikipedia accessed 7/24/2021 2:58 AM

[9] Text linguistics - Wikipedia accessed 7/24/2021 1:19 PM

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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