Looking for a suggested offline resource list.

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Paul Golder | Forum Activity | Posted: Fri, Sep 30 2022 4:45 AM

Anyone have a list of suggested resources to have downloaded when attending a class or study while not being connected to the internet?

Something to minimize the "Can't do that without a internet connection" message.

Thanks

"As any translator will attest, a literal translation is no translation at all."

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JT (alabama24) | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Sep 30 2022 5:05 AM

My suggestion is to have a few bibles downloaded, a few general commentaties, a few more general resources. Your search abilitites are limited when you have no internet connection, which hampers much. 

Of course, you should have your textbooks downloaded. Wink

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SineNomine | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Oct 2 2022 6:44 PM

My answer depends a lot on your theology. For example, Pentecostals probably don't need to download the 1983 Code of Canon Law.

“The trouble is that everyone talks about reforming others and no one thinks about reforming himself.” St. Peter of Alcántara

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Joseph Turner | Forum Activity | Replied: Yesterday 4:26 AM

JT (alabama24):

Of course, you should have your textbooks downloaded. Wink

I would say this for sure. 

Concerning an actual class, as a teacher, I don't want students reading through a bunch of resources while I'm teaching.  I want them paying attention and then doing the supplemental study afterward.

It also depends on the class.  I would always expect to have access to the major translations.  If it's a language course, then I would expect lexicons along with your textbooks and a critical text.  If it's an exegesis course, I would expect maybe the top couple of commentaries on the book being studied.

In general, it might be nice to have a basic one/two volume commentary like the NIV Cultural Background Commentary or the like to get quick information on whatever contextual information might be necessary, but again, I would not expect students to be spending a lot of time reading through information while I'm teaching.  If you are using major commentaries in class, then you will probably be spending a good bit of time searching for information to find what you are looking for, which will be taking up your class time.

Something like the IVP Black Dictionaries or the Anchor Bible Dictionaries might also be good to have on hand.

Concerning a group study situation, I would also recommend the major translations, a background commentary, and maybe a larger commentary set in case something comes up within the group that you need to look up and isn't covered by the shorter commentary.

Introductions to the OT and NT might also be helpful in study situations for quick broad information concerning themes, audience, dating and such, but those would also be covered in something like the NIV Cultural Background Commentary.

Again I would have the IVP Black Dictionaries and ABD on hand.

A lot of this depends on what you mean by "class" (seminary classes or church offered classes?) and "study" (group participation studies or individual led?)  

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HJ. van der Wal | Forum Activity | Replied: Yesterday 6:23 AM

Joseph Turner:

Concerning a group study situation, I would also recommend the major translations, a background commentary, and maybe a larger commentary set in case something comes up within the group that you need to look up and isn't covered by the shorter commentary.

Twenty years ago (before I had ever heard about Logos/Libronix) I would usually take two or three paper Bibles with me: the default translation used in my church, my preferred study Bible and the TBS edition of the Bible in the original languages (i.e. Masoretic Text and Textus Receptus in one volume).

Nowadays I have 29 resources downloaded in the Logos app on my smartphone and about 100 resources on my iPad.

In addition to the resources already mentioned I have also found the NET notes (first edition) to be very useful. 

A synopsis of the four gospels might be useful depending on the situation. On my iPad I use "Gospel Parallels - NRSV" by Burton H. Throckmorton Jr. but this resource is not usable on smaller screens. 

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