Westminster is back - Interpretation Commentary now available on pre-pub

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Mark Smith | Forum Activity | Posted: Mon, Aug 16 2010 11:45 AM

Much requested.

http://www.logos.com/products/prepub/details/6751?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+LogosPrepubs+%28Logos+Pre-Publications%29

Daily Study Bible is expected, too. Looks like it might be coming soon.

Pastor, North Park Baptist Church

Bridgeport, CT USA

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Greg | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Aug 16 2010 11:50 AM

I'm excited to see it because I've heard so many requests for it to return to Logos. I haven't had any experience with this commentary at all.

Can anyone out there who has help me justify committing $700 to purchase it?

Thanks!

Greg

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Mark Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Aug 16 2010 2:13 PM

Greg,

I don't have this series or any of the individual volumes. There are folks here that speak very highly of some individual volumes in the series. I may be telling you what you already know, but D.A. Carson says this about the series:

The Interpretation series of commentaries (/John Knox) focuses less on detailed exegesis than on the thrust and themes of the biblical books, presented in a way best calculated to help the preacher and to relate the text to a wider context. The aim is admirable; the execution is mixed, partly because the thinness of the exegesis sometimes allows room for rather too much speculation.

Carson, D. A. (2007). New Testament commentary survey (6th ed.) (24). Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic.

If you check here: http://www.bestcommentaries.com/best.aspx you'll see that by their rating system no single Interpretation commentary is listed in the Top Two for any Bible book. Checking some individual Bible books on that same site you'll see where the Interpretation volumes fall within their ratings.

I know this isn't exactly the information you desire. Hopefully someone with a preference for or greater experience with these commentaries can help out.

Pastor, North Park Baptist Church

Bridgeport, CT USA

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Mike Aubrey | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Aug 16 2010 2:18 PM

Mark A. Smith:
Carson, D. A. (2007). New Testament commentary survey (6th ed.) (24). Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic.

I don't have my copy in front of me, but I know from memory that Tremper Longman III's OT commentary survey generally speakers quite highly of many of the volumes - Walter Brueggemann on Genesis is one volume in particular that is absolutely fantastic.

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DIsciple II | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Aug 16 2010 2:43 PM

Mark and Greg. It's great to see it back., though glad its one prepub i can ignore since I already own it.

Greg Masone:

I'm excited to see it because I've heard so many requests for it to return to Logos. I haven't had any experience with this commentary at all.

Can anyone out there who has help me justify committing $700 to purchase it?

Thanks!

Greg

Greg I recommend viewing the set at BestCommentaries: http://bestcommentaries.com/series/interpretation-int/.  From this page you can click on any title in the set and get reviews on that volume.

Greg, this is the series preface:

Series Preface

This series of commentaries offers an interpretation of the books of the Bible. It is designed to meet the need of students, teachers, ministers, and priests for a contemporary expository commentary. These volumes will not replace the historical critical commentary or homiletical aids to preaching. The purpose of this series is rather to provide a third kind of resource, a commentary which presents the integrated result of historical and theological work with the biblical text.

An interpretation in the full sense of the term involves a text, an interpreter, and someone for whom the interpretation is made. Here, the text is what stands written in the Bible in its full identity as literature from the time of "the prophets and apostles," the literature which is read to inform, inspire, and guide the life of faith. The interpreters are scholars who seek to create an interpretation which is both faithful to the text and useful to the church. The series is written for those who teach, preach, and study the Bible in the community of faith.

The comment generally takes the form of expository essays. It is planned and written in the light of the needs and questions which arise in the use of the Bible as Holy Scripture. The insights and results of contemporary scholarly research are used for the sake of the exposition. The commentators write as exegetes and theologians. The task which they undertake is both to deal with what the texts say and to discern their meaning for faith and life. The exposition is the unified work of one interpreter.

The text on which the comment is based is the Revised Standard Version of the Bible and, since its appearance, the New Revised Standard Version. The general availability of these translations makes the printing of a text in the commentary unnecessary. The commentators have also had other current versions in view as they worked and refer to their readings where it is helpful. The text is divided into sections appropriate to the particular book; comment deals with passages as a whole, rather than proceeding word by word, or verse by verse.

Writers have planned their volumes in light of the requirements set by the exposition of the book assigned to them. Biblical books differ in character, content, and arrangement. They also differ in the way they have been and are used in the liturgy, thought, and devotion of the church. The distinctiveness and use of particular books have been taken into account in decisions about the approach, emphasis, and use of space in the commentaries. The goal has been to allow writers to develop the format that provides for the best presentation of their interpretation.

The result, writers and editors hope, is a commentary that both explains and applies, an interpretation that deals with both the meaning and the significance of biblical texts. Each commentary reflects, of course, the writer’s own approach and perception of the church and world. It could and should not be otherwise. Every interpretation of any kind is individual in that sense; it is one reading of the text. But all who work at the interpretation of the Scripture in the church need the help and stimulation of a colleague’s reading and understanding of the text. If these volumes serve and encourage interpretation in that way, their preparation and publication will realize their purpose.

The Editors

 

 

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Dominick Sela | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Aug 16 2010 6:01 PM

I have used books by Walter Brueggemann and Pheme Perkins in classes, both books were excellent (Pheme Perkins was an intro academic book she wrote "Reading the New Testament", and Brueggemann's was a highly acclaimed tome, "Theology of the Old Testament" . Perkins is on faculty at Boston College, and Brueggemann, one of the top Old Testament  scholars of our time, is Professor of Old Testament Emeritus at Columbia Theological Seminary, Decatur, GA.

If the rest of the authors are as good as these or better, this is an outstanding prepub. It is a little expensive, but I imagine these are top academic scholars.

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Michael McLane | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Aug 16 2010 9:15 PM

I like the covers!

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Donovan R. Palmer | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Aug 17 2010 12:14 AM

Dominick Sela:
If the rest of the authors are as good as these or better, this is an outstanding prepub. It is a little expensive, but I imagine these are top academic scholars.

I consulted my usual commentary and reference surveys as I have not used this series before.  I wouldn't mind having it, but $700 is a price that would make it 'something I must really have' to justify.

The $139 update on DSB is similar. I never found Barclay to be that difficult to understand as we are not that distant from his style of English. Until I read the prepub stuff, it genuinely never entered my mind that it could be contemporized.

Both good resources, but both a bit pricey particularly if you already own DSB.

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Alex Scott | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Aug 17 2010 12:47 AM

Donovan R. Palmer:
Both good resources, but both a bit pricey particularly if you already own DSB.

Even worse if you already have the NT Interpretation but not the OT

Longtime Logos user (more than $30,000 in purchases) - now a second class user because I won't pay them more every month or year.

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Dominick Sela | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Aug 17 2010 5:35 AM

It's a lot of money but at about $16 a book for these scholarly references it's a good deal to be sure.

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DIsciple II | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Aug 17 2010 6:08 AM

Alex Scott:

Donovan R. Palmer:
Both good resources, but both a bit pricey particularly if you already own DSB.

Even worse if you already have the NT Interpretation but not the OT

Ouch!  Maybe they will be broken up at some stage.....

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