Hermeneia is newly available for download, and on sale for 50% off!!

Page 1 of 7 (131 items) 1 2 3 4 5 Next > ... Last »
This post has 130 Replies | 9 Followers

Posts 18703
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Posted: Tue, Sep 14 2010 11:45 AM

I've been waiting for this one for a while because $1200 was just too much to shell out, and it was available on CD only. But I just noticed today on the "new ebooks" feed (http://www.logos.com/ebooks/new) that it has just been released as a downloadable product. And they've slashed the price to $598!

Hermeneia (43 vols.)

Posts 1674
Paul N | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 14 2010 11:49 AM

wow thats what I call a price cut!  Would being downloadable cause this to be so much less expensive?

Posts 18703
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 14 2010 11:55 AM

Paul Newsome:

wow thats what I call a price cut!  Would being downloadable cause this to be so much less expensive?

Probably not, but they're probably trying to offer an incentive on it since this set has probably not sold many copies the way it was priced before. I'm guessing they will still make enough of a margin on it at this price to make it worth their while or they wouldn't be doing this. The previous price was probably somewhat constrained by the publisher, but now without having to ship it on CD they might have more freedom to negotiate a lower price.

I'm very excited about this and have emailed my Sales Rep to see if that's the bottom line price or if he can do even better than that. I'm ready to spring for it even at that price, though. Who knows how long the sale will last.

Posts 853
Michael McLane | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 14 2010 11:55 AM

This is a great deal. Having never had the opportunity to actually use Hermeneia for study, I understand it is rather technical, which I tend to like. With that, how would you describe the content and approach against WBC (more academic/technical, etc.)? Or, is there another set that you would compare it?

Posts 620
Jonathan | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 14 2010 12:14 PM

Wow! When did this happen? Was this announced in an email?

Rosie, did you get the special "Frequent Forum Posting" discount?

Syntax Searching Group | Michigan Logos Users | L5 FAQ | OSX 10.10 | 2.4 GHz i5 | 8 GB Ram

Posts 18703
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 14 2010 12:20 PM

Michael Paul:

This is a great deal. Having never had the opportunity to actually use Hermeneia for study, I understand it is rather technical, which I tend to like. With that, how would you describe the content and approach against WBC (more academic/technical, etc.)? Or, is there another set that you would compare it?

It's about as academic/techical as they come. Close to WBC in level of detail, but it also treats non-canonical books such as 1 Enoch. It has extremely thorough footnotes. There are a few volumes that you can search through and peruse some sample pages on Amazon.com. Do more than just click on the sample pages, since that will probably get you only the introduction. Actually search for something you know will be found throughout the commentary pages, such as LXX. Then click on one of the search hits fairly far into the commentary and page forward and backward from there. Here's one that has that search inside feature: http://www.amazon.com/Peter-Commentary-Hermeneia-Critical-Historical/dp/0800660307

Posts 18703
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 14 2010 12:25 PM

Jonathan:

Wow! When did this happen? Was this announced in an email?

 

I don't know. Could have been as recently as this week. I've been making a point of checking the "new ebooks" page (http://www.logos.com/ebooks/new) every so often, and I just happened to check it this morning after not checking for a couple of weeks. I think you can set it up to have it feed into your feed reader but I'm not sure how. It doesn't show that it has an RSS feed. But just I tried pasting it into Google Reader and Google Reader claims it will track the page for me and let me know when there are any changes. We'll see.

Jonathan:

Rosie, did you get the special "Frequent Forum Posting" discount?

Hee hee! I wish. Smile

I've just been told by my Sales Rep that $598 is the best price ever offered, even better than it was in pre-pub. The 40 volume pre-pub price was $500, and the 3 volume upgrade pre-pub price was $129.95.

So I'm going to buy it now! Yipee!!!

Posts 1134
Juanita | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 14 2010 12:36 PM

Jonathan:

Wow! When did this happen? Was this announced in an email?

Rosie, did you get the special "Frequent Forum Posting" discount?

My salesman called me last Friday and offered this deal to me then so I already have them on my system.  It helps to be in contact with your dedicated sales person.

 

Posts 13368
Forum MVP
Mark Barnes | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 14 2010 12:37 PM

Hermeneia is pretty critical in its approach (for better and worse), and like most sets quite variable. It's not very theological, but will often pay close attention to historical background. Some of the volumes are quite old (though not as bad as ICC), and several are translations from German theologians. The problem with the older volumes is that they sometimes employed methods which have not stood the test of time. Sometimes they're surprisingly brief, other volumes (e.g. Romans) are very substantial.

Carson says of the NT volumes: "Hermeneia (SCM/Fortress) is a full-scale critical commentary series that devotes considerable attention to parallel texts. Unlike the ICC, allowance is made for readers without a classical education by providing translations (usually from the Loeb edition) of cited Greek and Latin authors. Several of the volumes are translations of German works, and initially this included some extremely dated books (e.g., Bultmann on the Johannine Epistles), but these are being replaced (in this instance by a major commentary written by Strecker). Haenchen on John, however, should have been put out to pasture long ago. “Parallelomania” (to use Sandmel’s famous expression) and a naive appeal to history-of-religions assumptions frequently surface in the volumes of this series, but the series remains invaluable for the serious exegete and expositor. A few volumes are outstanding (e.g., Attridge on Hebrews)."

Tremper Longman has a slightly higher view on the OT volumes.

Personally I find it useful for academic work, but with one or two exceptions only, not really useful for preaching (because it tends to answer questions I'm not really asking in sermon preparation).

Completely at random, here's the comments on Acts 13:8 from various technical commentaries (there happens to be two commentaries on Acts in Hermenia - t:

Hermeneia (new): As Susan Garrett shows, Paul and Bar-Jesus “represent superhuman figures.” In literary terms, their function is symbolic. The magus, now identified as “Elymas,” with the incomprehensible explanation that renders this name or title, took exception to the pair. The setting is utterly vague. Is the reader to envision an interview in the gubernatorial palace, with Sergius seated while Saul and Barnabas address him (in turn?), and the magus in his normal place, or a less formal conversation in private rooms? If the pair had no opportunity to speak, what was the ground of Bar-Jesus’s objection (and v. 12b*)? A discussion on a street-corner seems quite unlikely. There is no background; all is foreground, the confrontation, marked by “seek” (ζητέω [vv. 7*, 8*, 11*]), “proconsul,” “faith”/“believe” (πίστις, πιστεύω [vv. 7*, 8*, 12*]). Between these two pillars, Bar-Jesus is crushed. His attempt to dissuade results in persuasion. The favored magus becomes a blind beggar. The “change of names” evidently serves the same end. The good Jew Saul is also the good Roman Paul,67 while the barbarous appellation “Bar-Jesus” belongs to Elymas (or Hetoimas, etc.), who is better titled “Bar-Satan” (v. 10*).

Hermeneia (old): The magician’s new name is surprising. The word Elymas is obscure. Luke apparently understands it (in Diodorus Sic. 20.17.1; 20.18.3, a Libyan name) as an appellative, “magician”; or does he equate Bar-Jesus and Elymas?18 Some have proposed Semitic derivations: from the Aramaic אַלִּימָא = “strong,” or the Arabic alim, which is close to μάγος, “magician” (˓ālim, “learned”; ˓al̄im, “omniscient,” used only of Allah), or from the Aramaic חלמא, “expert in the interpretation of dreams.” In an inscription Ηλειμ is found as a name (in Tyre). Codex D has the form ΕΤ[Ο]ΙΜΟΣ, “Hetoimos,” by which many are reminded of the Jew ΑΤΟΜΟΣ, “Atomos,” who posed as a magician (Josephus Ant. 20.142). Jews enjoyed a certain fame as magicians (cf. 19:13*).21 At an early point μάγος, “magician,” had a derogatory connotation in Greek; Philostratus (Vita Apoll. 1.2) rejects this designation for Apollonius of Tyana. Again, we recognize the Lukan criticism of magic. Its style is not that of the philosophical criticism of miracles. Luke does not say that magic is a fraud (in the manner of Lucian, in his Philops.), but that it is destroyed by the power of Jesus (cf. Ignatius Eph. 19.3).

NICNT: But the sorcerer did his best to distract the proconsul’s attention from the gospel, opposing it for all he was worth; no doubt he suspected that, if the proconsul paid too much attention to the faith the missionaries were proclaiming, his own place at court was likely to be endangered.
The Greek word translated “magician” or “sorcerer” is magos. As Peter confronted Simon Magus in Samaria, so Paul confronts Barjesus in Cyprus. A Jew, even a renegade Jew (as this man evidently was), would not have been a member of the magian priesthood; he was a magos in the more popular sense. Luke calls him a false prophet, not (probably) in the sense that he foretold things which did not come to pass, but in the sense that he claimed falsely to be a medium of divine revelation. Elymas, the alternative name which Luke gives him, is probably a Semitic word with a similar meaning to magos; it cannot be an interpretation of “Barjesus.”

ICC: At this point the magus, who may perhaps be thought of as court astrologer, intervenes. ἀνθίστατο, middle; cf. 6:10, where in a similar context the active is used. If Luke intends any difference, which is doubtful — he may be following sources — the present verse will suggest that the magus spoke up on his own account; he was not representing the proconsul, who in fact turned out to be of a different mind. The magus is now called Ἐλύμας, and it is affirmed that so his name μεθερμηνεύεται. After an ὄνομα which is undoubtedly Semitic in form (v. 6) this word can mean only, is translated. It is however impossible to translate Bar-Jesus as Elymas, since Elymas (Ἐλύμας) is not a Greek word (at least, it is not listed in LS; ἔλυμος has several meanings: case, quiver, a kind of pipe, millet). It might be wise to cut short discussion of the problem that results by saying with Bengel, ‘Barjehu et Elymas, nescio quomodo, synonyma sunt.’ Failing this, the simplest and probably correct solution is that both names were, in the tradition (or traditions) that Luke used, applied to the man in question, and that Luke assumed that the form that appeared to be Greek must be a translation of the Semitic; cf. 4:36. The assumption is a natural one, though Luke might have reflected that the Latin Paul is not a translation of the Semitic Saul (v. 9). There are however other possibilities; for much detail see P. W. Schmiedel in EBib, s.v. Barjesus; Clark (350–4); Metzger (402f.); Hemer (227f.); and all the commentaries. One line of attack is to reconsider the meaning of Βαριησοῦς (with the textual variants) in the light of Ἐλύμας, or rather of the variant Ετοιμας which appears in D, supported, with not a little variation, by a number of Old Latin MSS and Lucifer. This form of the name, which suggests the adjective ἑτοῖμος, ready, has given rise to the suggestion that behind Βαριησοῦς should be seen the Aramaic and Syriac root š-w-ʾ which, among other things, signifies (according to Driver, quoted by Clark; the Aramaic שוא does not appear in Jastrow, though the corresponding Syriac word is in Payne Smith) to be equal, sufficient, worth, deemed worthy, hence perhaps ready for some purpose. Another suggestion rests upon a variant in Josephus, Ant. 20:142, which is often read Σίμωνα ὀνόματι … Ἰουδαῖον, Κύπριον δὲ τὸ γένος, μάγον εἶναι σκηπτόμενον. In this passage there is substantial evidence for reading, instead of Σίμωνα,Ἄτομον (printed in the text e.g. of L. H. Feldman) and this form of the name is not unlike Ἐτοιμᾶς; either could be a corruption of the other, and J. R. Harris (Expositor, fifth series, 5 (1902), 189–95) thought that Ἕτοιμος should be accepted as the original text of Acts. F. C. Burkitt (JTS 4 (1903), 127–9) conjectured that the text had suffered corruption and that Bar-Jesus was originally glossed by Luke ὁ λοιμός, the pest, the pestilent fellow. On the assumption that Elymas represents not the name Bar-Jesus but the occupation of the magus it has been suggested that we should think of the Aramaic חלמא an interpreter of dreams, or of אלימא, strong, powerful; alternatively, there is the Arabic ‘alim, wise, learned. See L. Yaure (JBL 79 (1960), 297–314). But ‘Why should a Jew in Cyprus at the court of a Roman consular governor be called by an obscure Arabic nickname?’ (Begs. 4:144). A simple error seems the best explanation. Apparently the proconsul was inclined to look with favour on the message of Barnabas and Saul: ἥδιστα ἤκουεν αὐτῶν (D*(E)syh** mae). This the magus intended to discourage; acceptance of the Christian message would no doubt have meant the end of his employment (whether because the proconsul no longer believed in sorcery or because he thought the missionaries more powerful sorcerers). ἡ πίστις can here be hardly other than the faith, though it is noted in v. 12 that Sergius Paulus believed, that is, became a believer, that is, exercised faith.

Anchor: 8. Elymas the magician. MS D reads the name as Etoimas. (for that is what his name means). This is a Lucan explanation of the Greek name Elymas, but that that name means magos, “magician,” is far from clear. No one knows what it means. Ancient versions have simply transliterated the name: thus, Vg Elimas; Pešitta ʾEllumas; Bohairic Elumas. Some modern commentators (e.g., J. Lightfoot) have invoked Arabic ʿalîm, “wise man, magician,” but that too is problematic, because its relationship is still unexplained. L. Yaure (“Elymas—Nehelamite—Pethor,” JBL 79 [1960]: 297–314) interprets it as a form of Aramaic ḥālômāʾ, “dreamer,” which is no better, pace Schneider, Apg., 2.122, because ḥālôm is the Hebrew word for “dream,” not Aramaic.
opposed them, seeking to turn the proconsul away from the faith. I.e., from Christianity. Luke uses pistis in the content sense of what Christians believe, what later theologians have called fides quae (see NOTE on 6:7).

Posts 1674
Paul N | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 14 2010 12:47 PM

Jonathan:

Wow! When did this happen? Was this announced in an email?

I was just reading through the new books last night so it didn't pop up on the list until earlier today

Posts 26768
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 14 2010 1:44 PM

Michael Paul:
I understand it is rather technical, which I tend to like.

technical yes, but very understandable - enough so to be used as a text on the Song of Solomon in a lay summer non-credit class. It's my first choice of Commentaries.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 26768
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 14 2010 1:51 PM

Rosie Perera:
it also treats non-canonical books such as 1 Enoch

Rosie, I know from your wording that you expect me to respond. So I present a challenge: to which Jewish and which Christian group(s) is this a canonical book? A reward of a smilie face to the first correct answer.Cool

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 5090
DIsciple II | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 14 2010 1:52 PM

Rosie Perera:

I've been waiting for this one for a while because $1200 was just too much to shell out, and it was available on CD only. But I just noticed today on the "new ebooks" feed (http://www.logos.com/ebooks/new) that it has just been released as a downloadable product. And they've slashed the price to $598!

Hermeneia (43 vols.)

Maybe it will be the next Blog posting after the excellent one about Barnes.....

This is a good news...

Posts 18703
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 14 2010 2:05 PM

MJ. Smith:

Rosie Perera:
it also treats non-canonical books such as 1 Enoch

Rosie, I know from your wording that you expect me to respond.

I totally didn't see that sideswipe coming. Touché.

MJ. Smith:

So I present a challenge: to which Jewish and which Christian group(s) is this a canonical book? A reward of a smilie face to the first correct answer.Cool

I confess ignorance on that matter. At least I know there are canons for which 1 Enoch is canonical, but I have no idea which ones they are. I'd be interested in studying it and having a commentary volume on it, regardless.

Posts 26768
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 14 2010 2:21 PM

Rosie Perera:
but I have no idea which ones they are

For the Jewish group, think the Falasha - the Jews of Ethiopia many of whom Israel airlifted out of Ethiopia in the early 80's (?) ... my sense of history is rotten so don't trust my dates.Smile For the Christians, it would be the Ethiopian Orthodox.Big Smile

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 3163
Dominick Sela | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 14 2010 2:23 PM

MJ. Smith:
So I present a challenge: to which Jewish and which Christian group(s) is this a canonical book? A reward of a smilie face to the first correct answer.Cool

 

I know the Ethiopian Orthodox treat it as orthodox. I thought it fell out of favor with the Jewish.

Posts 26768
Forum MVP
MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 14 2010 2:44 PM

Dominick Sela:
I know the Ethiopian Orthodox treat it as orthodox. I thought it fell out of favor with the Jewish.

I would suspect that in Israel, at least, there has been pressure to join with the rabbinical canon. But I really don't know much about Israel's treatment of the non-rabbinic schools - Samaritan, Karaite and Falasha being the groups I know of.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 184
LogosEmployee
Dan Pritchett | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 14 2010 7:30 PM

Rosie Perera:

I've been waiting for this one for a while because $1200 was just too much to shell out, and it was available on CD only. But I just noticed today on the "new ebooks" feed (http://www.logos.com/ebooks/new) that it has just been released as a downloadable product. And they've slashed the price to $598!

Hermeneia (43 vols.)

Rosie, we can't slip anything by you at all... Wink

The price reduction is for a limited time only, and is in partnership with the publisher. We plan to announce the sale to everyone on NewsWire this week.

 

Posts 2212
Damian McGrath | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 14 2010 7:49 PM

Rosie Perera:
I've just been told by my Sales Rep that $598 is the best price ever offered, even better than it was in pre-pub. The 40 volume pre-pub price was $500, and the 3 volume upgrade pre-pub price was $129.95.

 

I wonder what happened to the claim "The Pre-Pub price today is the lowest price you’ll ever pay"....

Will we see other sets reduced to less than the pre-pub price?

Posts 497
Greg Masone | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Sep 14 2010 8:03 PM

Dan Pritchett:
The price reduction is for a limited time only

Dan, can you flesh out that "limited time only" part a bit more?  How much of a limited time? A week?  A month? Two months?

Very interested, but also not ready just yet to drop that amount of cash so unexpectedly!

Page 1 of 7 (131 items) 1 2 3 4 5 Next > ... Last » | RSS