Greek help

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James Thompson | Forum Activity | Posted: Fri, Nov 12 2010 6:50 AM

I have the most difficult time with Greek participles! Is there a single text, workbook, chart, paradigm that one would recommend to clear the fog? Thanks!

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Jack Caviness | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 12 2010 4:58 PM

You might try Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics by Daniel Wallace. It is is a standard textbook for intermediate Greek.

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Mark Barnes | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 12 2010 5:53 PM

The Pocket Dictionary for the Study of New Testament Greek is great when you forget what the various grammatical terms mean. Here's a sample:

adverbial participle. n. A participle that modifies and is subordinate to another verb. Adverbial participles are often categorized under more restrictive headings, such as temporal, purpose, means, etc. Also called the circumstantial or conjunctive participle.

causal participle. n. A participle that denotes cause, reason or basis.

complementary participle. n. A participle that appears in conjunction with another verb and complements it. See Matthew 11:1; Acts 12:16; Ephesians 1:16. Sometimes referred to as the supplementary participle.

participle. n. A word that has characteristics of both a verb and an adjective—a “verbal adjective.” As such, the Greek participle has gender, number and case (the adjectival side), as well as tense and voice (the verbal side).

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George Somsel | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 12 2010 5:54 PM

James Thompson:

I have the most difficult time with Greek participles! Is there a single text, workbook, chart, paradigm that one would recommend to clear the fog? Thanks!

That somewhat depends on what your problem with participles happens to be.  If you simply need to recognize what the tense of a particular participle might be then I would recommend that you review the principle parts of the verb.  The principles for this can be found in most grammars.  If, however, you want to see actual examples of participles then you might try Chapman Greek New Testament Insert which give the nominative singular form of the participles in the verb charts (and principle parts of many in the section on principle parts.  I would recommend that you learn the principles for deriving the principle parts for the regular verbs.  For irregular verbs you will simply need to learn them.  If they ever get around to publishing Smyth's Greek Grammar in Logos he is quite helpful or you can purchase the print edition.

george
gfsomsel

יְמֵי־שְׁנוֹתֵינוּ בָהֶם שִׁבְעִים שָׁנָה וְאִם בִּגְבוּרֹת שְׁמוֹנִים שָׁנָה וְרָהְבָּם עָמָל וָאָוֶן

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