Can somebody help me with the greek versions?

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Posts 60
Rev. Nannette La Fosse | Forum Activity | Posted: Tue, Feb 1 2011 8:53 PM

Hi:

  I need to get the answer to some questions that I have and that have been a confusion for me for some time. I am not a language scholar, but would like to learn greek & hebrew in the near future, I have seen that hebrew versions are limited and are more focused to Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia, with maybe few other versions.

On the other hand, there are so many  greek versions, that I get confused [with variants, without, Nestle-aland: Greek New Testament Textus Receptus, Septuagint ,Modern Greek , Ancient greek, Koine Greek New Testament , Byzantine Majority, Greek NT Scrivener, Wescott-Hort New Testament, etc,

Now, if I want to read the most accurate greek version that is available to buy, which one should be my selection? Which version should I use if I'm learning greek? What are variants? Why there are different morphologies?

If possible I would like to know about the importance of other versions like Syriac, Aramaic, Pishitta, etc.

I really appreciate the answer for these questions. I have Logos 4 Gold and have many language resources that I would like to use once I start studying the languages.

In Christ Jesus,

Rev. Nannette La Fosse

 

Posts 286
Mathew Voth | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Feb 1 2011 9:13 PM

Hi Rev. Nannette,

You are correct, BHS is the standard for doing Hebrew studies. Perhaps where you are getting confused is that there is a big difference between manuscripts and versions. Manuscripts are the original sources from which our versions are based. The standard Greek version today is the United Bible Societies (UBS) 4th revised version. Nestle-Aland is the same text, however its does not discuss textual matters in the same way (apparatuses). Both of these are based on multiple manuscripts (originals), with the text decided on using textual-critical methods.  The importance of the other languages (Syriac etc.) is that they can be helpful for determining which manuscripts most accuratley reflect the original manuscripts (as there are a number of variants, and corruptions occured throughout the centuries).

So for your pusposes, I would stick to BHS for Hebrew, and UBS 4 for Greek.

However, what you really need to do is get your hands on some good introductory grammars, such as those published by Zondervan: Basics of Biblical (Greek/Hebrew).

Finally, there are different morpholoiges, because there are different manuscripts that are current versions are based upon.

Hope this helps, Blessings, Matt

Posts 286
Mathew Voth | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Feb 1 2011 9:23 PM

Perhaps my terminology is misleading, when I say "originals" I do not mean the inspired autographs, but rather the ancient copies that provide our closest representations of the "originals."

Posts 759
Tobias Lampert | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Feb 1 2011 11:21 PM

Mathew Voth:
Nestle-Aland is the same text, however its does not discuss textual matters in the same way (apparatuses).

That's not completely accurate: Both versions are based on the same manuscripts, but there are e.g. differences in punctuation, which in itself is a sort of specific interpretation of the given text - something the reader must always be aware of. Thus said, both of them are to be considered as standard versions with slightly differing approaches - the UBS4 primarily fits special needs of translators, whereas NA27 offers more textual variants in the critical apparatus, which first and foremost is interesting for a more academic approach.

Regarding the Logos-editions of UBS4/NA27: please notice that, due to license issues, both of them come without the critical apparatuses (except the SESB packages), so you will still have to purchase a hardcopy.

By the way: the SBLGNT (look here) comes with a critical apparatus (though this one is quite different). If you can't afford to buy a SESB package, this can be very useful as well!

Mathew Voth:
Finally, there are different morpholoiges, because there are different manuscripts that are current versions are based upon.

Again, not completely accurate (sorry Stick out tongue): every morphology is based on a specific linguistic theory or a combination of such theories. So there are even different morphologies for one and the same text. Having a couple of them can be quite helpful for a full understanding (e.g. since differing morphological definitions could indicate complex problems for translation and interpretation). Anyhow, having only one morphology is sufficient for "normal" usage (and quite an improvement compared to having only a hardcopy).

Blessing,

Tobias

 

"Mach's wie Gott - werde Mensch!" | theolobias.de

Posts 2774
David Ames | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Feb 2 2011 3:38 PM

In Gold is the book “A Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament by Bruce M. Metzger”

The introduction starting on page XV will get you started in Textual Criticism

Posts 60
Rev. Nannette La Fosse | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Feb 3 2011 11:48 AM

Thanks Matthew for your assistance. I'm new to this area and I really wanted something simple. I'm still trying to understand some terms as apparatus, variants, etc. I will definitely look to your recomendations.

Rev. Nannette La Fosse

Posts 60
Rev. Nannette La Fosse | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Feb 3 2011 11:50 AM

Thanks David. I will look to your reference on that book.

 

Rev. Nannette La Fosse

Posts 1991
Donnie Hale | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Feb 3 2011 12:17 PM

Another book by Metzger that really helped me is "The Text of the New Testament - Its Transmission, Corruption, and Restoration". It goes through definitions and examples of all those words, etc. I thought it was available in Logos, but I don't see it right now.

Donnie

 

Posts 15805
Forum MVP
Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Feb 3 2011 12:27 PM

Rev. Nannette La Fosse:
I'm new to this area and I really wanted something simple.  I'm still trying to understand some terms as apparatus, variants, etc.

Searching Logos for textual NEAR criticism found many results - 59 articles in "A General Introduction to the Bible, Revised and Expanded"  For example, Details of the Dead Sea Scroll Texts has six variant comparisons between Masoritic Text, LXX, and New Testament, including:

  1.      A fragment from Cave IV containing Deuteronomy 32:8 reads, according to the number of the sons of God,“ which is translated angels of God” by the LXX, as in Genesis 6:4 (margin); Job 1:6; 2:1; and 38:7. The Masoretic Text reads, “according to the number of the children of Israel.”

  2.      The Masoretic Text of Exodus 1:5 reads “seventy souls,” whereas the LXX and the New Testament quote taken from it (cf. Acts 7:14) read “seventy-five souls.” A fragment of Exodus 1:5 from the Qumran Scrolls reads “seventy-five souls,” in agreement with the LXX.

  3.      Hebrews 1:6 (KJV), “Let all the angels of God worship him,” is a quote from the LXX of Deuteronomy 32:43. This quotation is not in agreement with the Masoretic Text, but one of the scroll fragments containing this section tends to confirm the Greek text (LXX).

 

Geisler, N. L., & Nix, W. E. (1996). A general introduction to the Bible (Rev. and expanded.) (367–368). Chicago: Moody Press.

 

Thankful for Logos videos for learning Greek and Hebrew => http://www.logos.com/product/5876/learn-to-use-biblical-greek-and-hebrew-with-logos-bible-software offers much of original language insights available to 3rd year language students.

Gold package includes UBS Handbooks that have many cross cultural translation insights:

http://www.logos.com/product/7842/the-united-bible-societies-old-testament-handbook-series

http://www.logos.com/product/6555/the-united-bible-societies39-new-testament-handbook-series

Keep Smiling Smile

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