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Posts 54
Mitch Davis | Forum Activity | Posted: Fri, Jul 10 2009 10:26 AM

I plan on using my next Windows PC mostly for:

  1. Sermon preparation: Logos; Word; PPT
  2. Website updating: Dreamweaver
  3. Recreation: TV tuner w/ Windows Media Center

Wanting to stay under $1,000 and Logos as my main app to run efficiently. ....what would you suggest? Also, has anyone done side-by-side Logos testing with similar hardware specs between Windows 32 vs. 64 bit OS?

Thanks,
Mitch 

Posts 1956
Donovan R. Palmer | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 10 2009 10:32 AM

Mitch Davis:
Wanting to stay under $1,000 and Logos as my main app to run efficiently. ....what would you suggest? Also, has anyone done side-by-side Logos testing with similar hardware specs between Windows 32 vs. 64 bit OS?

My inlaws just installed a Dell desktop and they got a lot of bang for buck for about that price range.

I know some of the Logos staff on here run 64 bit, but I'd guess that the performance is either the same or even a bit less due to Logos software being 32 bit.  That said, one of the Logos staff might have some actual benchmarks for you to look at.

Posts 54
Mitch Davis | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 10 2009 10:42 AM

Thanks Donovan,

Donovan R. Palmer:

My inlaws just installed a Dell desktop

I was actually looking at this Dell the last couple days:

Dell - XPS Desktop with Intel® Core™2 Quad Processor
Model: X430-121B | SKU: 9156619
Intel® Core™2 Quad processor Q8300; 6GB DDR2 SDRAM; DVD±RW/CD-RW drive; 750GB hard drive; Windows Vista Home Premium 64-bit with SP1 and TV tuner

Posts 9947
George Somsel | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 10 2009 10:56 AM

Mitch Davis:

I plan on using my next Windows PC mostly for:

 

  1. Sermon preparation: Logos; Word; PPT
  2. Website updating: Dreamweaver
  3. Recreation: TV tuner w/ Windows Media Center

 

Wanting to stay under $1,000 and Logos as my main app to run efficiently. ....what would you suggest? Also, has anyone done side-by-side Logos testing with similar hardware specs between Windows 32 vs. 64 bit OS?

Thanks,
Mitch 

Whether you can stay in that price range depends on what you want.  If you want a laptop, you are going to pay more than for a desktop.  You can still stay under $1000, but again that depends on what you want.  I got a laptop as my new computer and I paid more than $1000, but it is a 17" model so that I can type comfortably (i.e., I didn't just get it for the screen) and has 6 Gb of memory as well as a 500 Gb HD.  So, pick your poison !

george
gfsomsel

יְמֵי־שְׁנוֹתֵינוּ בָהֶם שִׁבְעִים שָׁנָה וְאִם בִּגְבוּרֹת שְׁמוֹנִים שָׁנָה וְרָהְבָּם עָמָל וָאָוֶן

Posts 54
Mitch Davis | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 10 2009 11:02 AM

George Somsel:

If you want a laptop, you are going to pay more than for a desktop.  

Desktop...got the lappy already Big Smile

Posts 390
Alain Maashe | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 10 2009 11:18 AM

For almost $1000 after tax, I would not buy the PC listed above,

The CPU is a Quad processor Q8300; it is decent but two generations behind the latest series (Q9XXX, and Core i7). More worrisome are the video card (the outdated ATI RADEON HD 3650) and the unnamed “Built-in TV tuner", an unnamed component is never a good sign, it generally means a low grade component with limited usefulness.

I build my own PCs and for a $1000, I could build 2 PCs with better specs than the Dell model which has only one year warranty

Another reason not to buy a dell is that they use proprietary hardware (difficult and expensive to replace once you one year warranty runs out) and they have few expansion slots, thus limiting the amount of cards and accessories you can add to the PC

what I recommend is for you to find a place that build custom computers and select the individual parts yourself (Fry's for example assembles the PC for you for around $80 with the parts you select from their store, Microcenter might be able to do the same) or you could find a place online.

This is especially important when it comes to the TV tuner ( digital or analog, single or dual turner allowing you to record two shows at one time and so on). TV Tuners are not created equal and a lot of research must go into selecting one: do you plan to record digital TV with an antenna (OTA), or from your cable line (QAM), is the decoding done at the level of hardware or software?

Alain

Posts 347
Mitch Davis | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 10 2009 11:31 AM

Alain Maashe:

For almost $1000 after tax, I would not buy the PC listed above,

what I recommend is for you to find a place that build custom computers...

Alain,

You just gave me a wonderful "challenge" opportunity (I've built them in the past). That said, if you have the time I'll be happy to go out and buy the right pieces (this is where I plea ignorance because it has been a decade since I was really into the hardware specs). I plan on recording from a cable line. As for decoding from hardware or software... I have no idea (does that mean I've answered the question Wink?). [Addendum: I do have a Samsung SyncMaster with a cable-in port so that I can watch cable via the monitor....but I may want to have the "TV" on and do other work simultaneously....thus the need to go through something like Windows Media Center]

Thanks again,
Mitch

Posts 9947
George Somsel | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 10 2009 12:15 PM

Mitch Davis:

Alain Maashe:

For almost $1000 after tax, I would not buy the PC listed above,

what I recommend is for you to find a place that build custom computers...

Alain,

You just gave me a wonderful "challenge" opportunity (I've built them in the past). That said, if you have the time I'll be happy to go out and buy the right pieces (this is where I plea ignorance because it has been a decade since I was really into the hardware specs). I plan on recording from a cable line. As for decoding from hardware or software... I have no idea (does that mean I've answered the question Wink?). [Addendum: I do have a Samsung SyncMaster with a cable-in port so that I can watch cable via the monitor....but I may want to have the "TV" on and do other work simultaneously....thus the need to go through something like Windows Media Center]

Thanks again,
Mitch

Today I don't think you will really save anything substantial by building your own though it will give you more control over what goes inside.  That can be good if you know what you're doing; otherwise I would leave it to those who know.  Remember, you may not need to replace your monitor (I have no idea what you have).  You can buy a fairly decent desktop computer sans monitor for under $1000.

george
gfsomsel

יְמֵי־שְׁנוֹתֵינוּ בָהֶם שִׁבְעִים שָׁנָה וְאִם בִּגְבוּרֹת שְׁמוֹנִים שָׁנָה וְרָהְבָּם עָמָל וָאָוֶן

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Rich DeRuiter | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 10 2009 12:23 PM

Alain Maashe:

For almost $1000 after tax, I would not buy the PC listed above,

The CPU is a Quad processor Q8300; it is decent but two generations behind the latest series (Q9XXX, and Core i7). More worrisome are the video card (the outdated ATI RADEON HD 3650) and the unnamed “Built-in TV tuner", an unnamed component is never a good sign, it generally means a low grade component with limited usefulness.

I build my own PCs and for a $1000, I could build 2 PCs with better specs than the Dell model which has only one year warranty

Another reason not to buy a dell is that they use proprietary hardware (difficult and expensive to replace once you one year warranty runs out) and they have few expansion slots, thus limiting the amount of cards and accessories you can add to the PC

what I recommend is for you to find a place that build custom computers and select the individual parts yourself (Fry's for example assembles the PC for you for around $80 with the parts you select from their store, Microcenter might be able to do the same) or you could find a place online.

This is especially important when it comes to the TV tuner ( digital or analog, single or dual turner allowing you to record two shows at one time and so on). TV Tuners are not created equal and a lot of research must go into selecting one: do you plan to record digital TV with an antenna (OTA), or from your cable line (QAM), is the decoding done at the level of hardware or software?

Alain

Alain, yes these components are not the best, but Dave wants a computer for under $1000.

I've had both Dell and home-built computers. There are issues with both, but the Dell's I've had are much more reliable. The downside of a home-built computer is that not all components 'play well together.' Another issue is that there is typically no warranty at all on home built computers, and component warranties sometimes require sending the component in for repair, potentially making a computer worthless until the component is fixed.

Having a store build you a computer is not always a good option either. It depends on the store, the salesperson and the technical expertise of the one putting things together. We have a store-built computer at the church. It is anything but reliable. Since we have to open the case to determine which motherboard we have, what type of RAM, and whether that's a PCI or AGP slot for the video card (yes, it's an old system). The biggest thing to watch: keeping the system cool. The right fans in the right case (properly installed!), with the right proper power-supply is the key to this. Don't try to buy any of these as 'budget' components.

Dell does not have 'proprietary hardware' unless one buys one of those miniaturized desktops. For systems with full sized cases, they have reputable hardware manufacturers make products according to their specs. These are not 'proprietary' but are OEM specs. This means that it is easy to upgrade RAM, hard drives, video cards, etc. without problems -- as long as you buy the components that fit the OEM specs. I've done it many times. Since Dell is so well known, most component manufacturers' web sites include searching for items that meat the specs of your particular Dell model.

The number of expansion slots is directly related to which model you get, not whether the model is a Dell or not. Once again, those slim-line cases are very limited. But their full-sized cases offer expandability comparable to what you could build yourself.

With the TV tuner, I do agree with Alaine.The best ones these days are engineered in Germany.

Another factor to consider is sound processing. Most low-end Dells do not have a dedicated sound card. While I've not done TV-in with my computer, I do know that recording sound can be processor intensive. A dedicated TV card would probably do the trick, but if you're trying to do this with a standard video card with a TV-in connection, I would get a dedicated sound card too.

I would also consider one of the Studio XPS computers with the i7 processors, instead of the core 2 Quad.

The Dell I'm writing from is about 6 years old. It has stood the test of time. I just bought another one (my 4th Dell), and my philosophy is buy a little more than I need right now and save more money in the long run. You might find it more economical to spend another $200-$500 to get something that would last you another couple of years.

As far as running LDLS goes, the setup you've selected should run it very well. We'll see what the specs for version 4 will be.

 

 Help links: WIKI;  Logos 6 FAQ. (Phil. 2:14, NIV)

Posts 8967
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Matthew C Jones | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 10 2009 12:30 PM

Donovan R. Palmer:

Mitch Davis:
Wanting to stay under $1,000 and Logos as my main app to run efficiently. ....what would you suggest? Also, has anyone done side-by-side Logos testing with similar hardware specs between Windows 32 vs. 64 bit OS?

My inlaws just installed a Dell desktop and they got a lot of bang for buck for about that price range.

I know some of the Logos staff on here run 64 bit, but I'd guess that the performance is either the same or even a bit less due to Logos software being 32 bit.  That said, one of the Logos staff might have some actual benchmarks for you to look at.

I am very interested in any such benchmarks for running LOGOS on a 64-bit operating system. I am planning on upgrading that direction just for the higher RAM ceiling. In the old days we would always get the biggest bang for the buck by maxing out the RAM. I haven't kept up with the new generation of hardware because 32-bit XP has worked well for me. Only noticeable slowdowns are when I do a global search.  What are the ideal hardware specs you would recommend for happy LOGOS use? (Just generic specs.) Will Windows 7 improve performance? I'd prefer to leapfrog Vista.

 

Logos 7 Collectors Edition

Posts 1956
Donovan R. Palmer | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 10 2009 1:22 PM

Richard DeRuiter:
I've had both Dell and home-built computers. There are issues with both, but the Dell's I've had are much more reliable. The downside of a home-built computer is that not all components 'play well together.' Another issue is that there is typically no warranty at all on home built computers, and component warranties sometimes require sending the component in for repair, potentially making a computer worthless until the component is fixed.

One of the good things about Dell is that they have such a large customer base. So if there is a bug in a driver, there's a lot of people who replicate the problem and therefore a greater chance of it getting fixed. This means that the drivers in Dell computers probably "mature" faster than you would see in computer companies that have a smaller customer base.

 

Posts 54
Mitch Davis | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 10 2009 1:44 PM

Good feedback everyone....I have benefited from the pros/cons of building/purchasing. I'm comfortable with Dell (overall). 

The most pertinent information I could benefit from are the actual specs for sub $1,000: with the following wants:

  1. Windows 7 - I'm guessing 64 so I can have a higher RAM ceiling...performance boost with Logos 4.x.
  2. TV Tuner. ANY RECOMMENDATIONS? I have "Germany" but brand names would be most helpful.
  3. reputable HD (I can swap out if needed)
  4. Dedicated video card
  5. DD2 vs. DD3 RAM/price performace.... with use of Logos

Thanks again all...you've already been most helpful,
Mitch 

Posts 8967
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Matthew C Jones | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 10 2009 1:44 PM

Donovan R. Palmer:

Richard DeRuiter:
I've had both Dell and home-built computers. There are issues with both, but the Dell's I've had are much more reliable. The downside of a home-built computer is that not all components 'play well together.' Another issue is that there is typically no warranty at all on home built computers, and component warranties sometimes require sending the component in for repair, potentially making a computer worthless until the component is fixed.

One of the good things about Dell is that they have such a large customer base. So if there is a bug in a driver, there's a lot of people who replicate the problem and therefore a greater chance of it getting fixed. This means that the drivers in Dell computers probably "mature" faster than you would see in computer companies that have a smaller customer base.

 

I have a few Dell computers in the house and are generally pleased with them. I have LOTS of HP computers (not Compaq branded) and I am VERY happy with this company. I believe the reasons you cite for Dell's success are also applicable to why HP is reliable and "matured" in the industry. I used to build my own machines years ago and loved the challenge of configuring it so everything would work. Nowadays it is all about the software I am running and I find it better to leave the compatibility issues for the pros who face them daily.  Richard made a good suggestion above when he said buy a little more than you need and it will be more economical in the long run. It would be nice if Bob Pritchett  could suggest what he would recommend as the minimum specs and the ideal specs for purchasing a new computer if one were buying for a theoretical, Super-Slick, soon-to-be-released, Bible Study Software. With so many LOGOS users buying new hardware soon it would be a tradgedy for someone to fall short of the ideal system.

 

Logos 7 Collectors Edition

Posts 390
Alain Maashe | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 10 2009 1:59 PM

George,

I just build two systems in the past month will high end components, they were half the price of anything sold in stores or online (one of them being a quad core Q9400 with a ATI HD 4890 video card)

One just needs to know where to buy and how to take advantage of sales, rebates, and so on.

Richard,

I agree that building a PC has drawbacks, the biggest being that you become you own customer support. However, if you know what you are doing, this becomes an advantage since support becomes available 24/7 and never expires  

The many systems I have built have been generally more reliable that the PCs I used to buy from Dell, Gateway, Compaq, and so on. Even more importantly in light of the fact that I overclock my PCs (my Core 2 Q9400 2.66 Ghz runs now at 3.2 Ghz and is faster than a regular Core i7 920).

You do not need to open the case to find details about you components (i.e. ram, video cards, and so on),a  software like Everest from Lavalys gives you more detail info that what you can see  by opening the case short of looking at the product’s manual itself

I do not want to get into semantics with the difference between 'proprietary parts' and what you call “OEM specs” but Dell used to be infamous for using proprietary hardware. I used to work in a computer lab with all Dell desktops, I would know.

It is true that Dell has been trying to get away from it but it is still something to keep in mind (i.e. finding a replacement part might not be as easy as going to a store like BestBuy or Fry’s)

As far as expansion slots/ HD are concerned, I was not implying that the number of expansion slots is determined by the manufacturer (which would not make much sense), what I meant is that most of the low end – to mid range PCs do not usually have an abundance of free slots (the model Mitch mentioned only has 2 PCU slots total and it is not clear what is free and what is not

If I build a computer, I  would not buy a Core i7 system now because it is overpriced like all new technologies. The sweet spot is found in the core 2 Quad Q9xxx series that can be found at bargain price and with an acceptable performance difference between them and the only kind of “affordable” core i7 which is the 920.

With the core i7, you not only need a new processor, but also new and more expensive ram (DDR3) and a new motherboard

the bottom line is this: if you are knowledgeable enough to build your own PC’s, it would be throwing you money away not to do so and not get better components that are suited for your specific needs

this is really a no brainer

if you are not knowledgeable enough, this becomes a little tricky. Having your computer built in a specialized PC store is an option if you can also get an extended warranty (lasting at least two to three years).

a one year warranty is a joke (the Dell system for Bestbuy only has one year) because many of the troubles you will encounter show up after a year

it is even better to buy direct from Dell than to get the system from Bestbuy

Bestbuy seems to want to offload old technology

Posts 9947
George Somsel | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 10 2009 2:18 PM

Mitch Davis:

Good feedback everyone....I have benefited from the pros/cons of building/purchasing. I'm comfortable with Dell (overall). 

The most pertinent information I could benefit from are the actual specs for sub $1,000: with the following wants:

 

  1. Windows 7 - I'm guessing 64 so I can have a higher RAM ceiling...performance boost with Logos 4.x.
  2. TV Tuner. ANY RECOMMENDATIONS? I have "Germany" but brand names would be most helpful.
  3. reputable HD (I can swap out if needed)
  4. Dedicated video card
  5. DD2 vs. DD3 RAM/price performace.... with use of Logos

 

Thanks again all...you've already been most helpful,
Mitch 

They're rolling out Windows 7 Oct 22.  I understand that some mfgs are offering a free upgrade.  I prepurchased Windows 7 and got it for about $50.00 so you might consider your options on this item.

george
gfsomsel

יְמֵי־שְׁנוֹתֵינוּ בָהֶם שִׁבְעִים שָׁנָה וְאִם בִּגְבוּרֹת שְׁמוֹנִים שָׁנָה וְרָהְבָּם עָמָל וָאָוֶן

Posts 390
Alain Maashe | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 10 2009 2:40 PM

Mitch Davis:

Good feedback everyone....I have benefited from the pros/cons of building/purchasing. I'm comfortable with Dell (overall). 

The most pertinent information I could benefit from are the actual specs for sub $1,000: with the following wants:

 

  1. Windows 7 - I'm guessing 64 so I can have a higher RAM ceiling...performance boost with Logos 4.x.
  2. TV Tuner. ANY RECOMMENDATIONS? I have "Germany" but brand names would be most helpful.
  3. reputable HD (I can swap out if needed)
  4. Dedicated video card
  5. DD2 vs. DD3 RAM/price performace.... with use of Logos

 

Thanks again all...you've already been most helpful,
Mitch 

 

  When it comes to memory , it is important to differentiate between real needs and the hype. In most cases, you do not need more than the maximum 3.5 gig of ram allowed by 32 bit OSes

If you are doing intensive image or video processing then some application would benefit from more memory, if not, it does you little good

See the article below

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/memory-module-upgrade,2264.html

The issue between DDR2 versus DDR3 is more complex that just what can of memory to get (important to keep in mind, most motherboards do not support both and if you go the core i7 route, you have no choice but to go DDR3). What determines the amount of bandwidth you get is influenced by the motherboard and the specific type of chipsets used. I would not worry too much about DDR2 versus DDR3 since the performance difference is affected by factors that you cannot control for the most part when you buy a system from a manufacturer. (Home builder have more control over that and can maximize each component ). The performance difference is negligible in most cases

See the link below

http://anandtech.com/memory/showdoc.aspx?i=2989&p=1

 

The best TV tuner are from Hauppage (a US company), most recommend the WinTV-HVR-2250 because it gives you dual tuners that are analog and digital and as such are future proof

http://www.hauppauge.com/site/products/data_hvr2250.htm

if the price is too steep, they have models with less features at a cheaper price (never buy from the manufacturer’s website)

When it comes to Logos. The two most important things are the hard drive and the processor speed

the best single hard drive outside of specialized solution like SCSI, is the Western digital raptor at 10000 rpm (better than investing in memory, this is where you want to spend the money in anything)

one could also choose a RAID configuration for even faster speed

but I believe this to be an overkill since logos is changing the libronix engine to be more like what Bibleworks has when it comes to speed

As such, a good 7200 rpm hard drive with a lot of space should do

A dedicated video card should be from ATI HD 45XX and above they have the best price/performance in the market and will handle HD video decoding very  well (no gaming unless you go for the HD 48xx series).  The advantage with AT HD 4XXX series is that it comes with audio and video HDMI

 

Posts 54
Mitch Davis | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 10 2009 2:44 PM

George Somsel:

They're rolling out Windows 7 Oct 22.  I understand that some mfgs are offering a free upgrade.  I prepurchased Windows 7 and got it for about $50.00 so you might consider your options on this item.

Got it a couple weeks ago...however, thanks for the headsup.

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Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 10 2009 8:59 PM

Mitch Davis:
has anyone done side-by-side Logos testing with similar hardware specs between Windows 32 vs. 64 bit OS?

Benchmarks are a little complex with a number of variables that affect Libronix performance like IE6 vs IE7 vs IE8, memory and HD speed. But I have compared 32-bit Vista vs 64-bit Win 7 Beta with IE8 beta on my laptop with 2.0 GHz Core2 Duo T7200 (4 MB L2), 2 GB memory, 160GB 5400 RPM HDD. Win7 was slower in Search ops but roughly the same or faster with reports like Passage Guide and Bible Word Study. Slightly disappointing but I would still recommend a final Windows 7 64-bit with at least 4 GB of memory on an "older generation" quad core processor!

We know that Libronix v4 is based on .NET 3.x and it will be inherently faster than anything based on IE, so going with the latest Windows OS and 64-bit will not be an issue. Logos may also offer a 64-bit version!

Dave
===

Windows 10 & Android 8

Posts 54
Mitch Davis | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jul 10 2009 9:12 PM

Thanks Dave....much appreciated information.

Posts 150
Jim Dean | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 11 2009 9:14 AM

Mitch Davis:
reputable HD (I can swap out if needed) 

Hi, Mitch

I don't know if you still want more advice ... asking a question like this on almost ANY forum (regardless of forum's official focus) tends to generate lots of feedback, and no few product-specific opinions.

One thing that has NOT been discussed in any detail yet is to my mind very relevant to the use of Libronix.  That is, the speed of the hard-drive access.

When you are dealing with multi-file database applications (and L is multi-multi-file, so to speak!), then the BOTTLENECK of many operations, such as searches across lots of books, is not related to the OS or to the chip or even (primarily) to the RAM, but rather to the hard drive and it's interface with the computer's "bus" (the pipe that all the data flows thru, between the components of the computer.  Typically a hard-drives net throughput speed is only 5-10% of the computer's bus speed.  This is an important "bottleneck" for some software.

The "access" time of the drive involves a lot of factors ... how big the files are, whether the successive files are continguously stored, what other stuff is going on, whether the data files are separate from places where "temp" (work) files are stored, yadda yadda.  But, the bottom line is ... if the application needs to rapidly access a bunch of files that scattered around, then your Hard Drive access speed needs to be optimized.

Depending on how the application is written, adding extra RAM can help with this, for some kinds of activities.  If the application is using the same files over and over, and if it (or the OS) is smart enough to upload the files from the HD to RAM, then things go really fast.  However, most app's don't do this ... and I'm pretty sure that L doesn't, at least for "general" resources.  So, if you like to search through lots of books for topical information, or access linked Bibles and lexicons simultaneously in tabs (my favored approach), then extra RAM (beyond a certain point) doesn't help too much.

The solution is to soup up your HD access.  This is VERY inexpensive to do, nowadays ... but most folks (including department-store computer sales people) do not fully understand it - or they don't know how to properly implement it.  I've done a lot of study on this - I'm no expert but hopefully what I've learned will help you and others.

First of all - the price tag for what I'm suggesting is less than $400.  You could do a "beefier" approach than that, which might increase the price a hundred dollars more, but $400 should do nicely.  Secondly - this is for desktops.  Thirdly - it does not matter what kind of machine or OS you are running.

Solution: set up a drive-D RAID-5 array, using a 32-bit slot controller and three or four hard drives with 32meg buffers, and relocate your Libronix Resources directory to that drive.  That's it, in a nutshell.  The controllers cost about $150 from Fry's or Microcenter ... Rocket RAID is both costeffective and very well thought-of.  Hard drives are incredibly cheap these days - one added benefit to this approach is that you get a truly huge amount of storage capacity out of it.  I just bought eleven HD's (I'm setting up two very powerful systems) from Fry's and Microcenter for about $70 apiece ... these were all Western Digital and Maxtor SATAII/300 drives with 750gig and 32meg buffers. 

It's important to get Hard Drives with 32meg buffers to maximize speed - most drives sold today have 16meg.  You can buy 640g and 750g and 1T, 2T, 3T drives with 32meg buffers, almost anywhere.  The 640's are avail in "green" versions that use small amounts of power when idling, if that's important to you.  Unless you are storing a huge video library on HD (unlikely, since copyrighted DVD's don't xfer), you don't need multiple 1T, 2T or 3T drives ... and the best price-points are in 640 and 750 now, anyway.  1T is also cost effective - they have 32m buffered 1T's for about $110 or so.

It's important to use RAID-5, not just RAID-0 or RAID-1.  A good explanation of the differences is here (click on the "click to play" button to see what's going on): http://support.dell.com/support/topics/global.aspx/support/entvideos/raid?s=gen .  Although many motherboards are capable of RAID-0 and RAID-1, most do not have onboard RAID-5, and even if they do, it's better to use a separate RAID controller card than the motherboard RAID.  The reasons for this get sort of technical - nutshell is that it's faster and cleaner.  Use your onboard controller for your Drive C, and put your programs on that drive (NOT the "Resource" folder, though).  Another issue with RAID controllers is what "open slots" you have available on your machine.  This is confusing, in itself, because the "longer" slots are not necessarily "faster".  From slowest to fastest:   PCI, PCI-X, PCIexpress-x1, PCIe-x2, PCIe-x4, PCIe-x8 ... note that PCI-X and PCIe-x1 are essentially the same speed.  The PCI and PCI-X slots are usually WHITE colored, and the PCIexpress are BLACK.  The white PCI's (slowest) are actually LONGER than the PCIe-x1, x2(rare), and x4 slots.  White PCI-X slots are a bit longer than PCIe-x8 slots.  PCIe-x1 slots are little tiny black things ... just keep in mind that they carry data just as fast as the much longer white PCI-X slots.  PCIx-x8's are usually one per machine, and used by video-monitor cards.  I believe that x16's are also available, but they wouldn't likely be open on your board (they'd be for HIGH end gaming video). 

Here's what you need to know about the slots:  the PCI-X and PCIe-x1 both offer MORE than adequate bandwidth for a 4-drive RAID-5 array.  If you got an 8-drive RAID card, then a PCIe-x4 would offer some benefit over an x1.  It's (usually) OK to use an x4 slot with an x1 card in it, by the way.  The only benefit of the PCIx-x1 over the PCI-X is that in some motherboards (for example many of Dell's), the PCIe cards interact more directly with the bus than the PCI-X does.  But those differences are very small.

. . . SELAH . . . I know this is getting sort of complex but since most non-geeky salespeople don't understand it (yet they pretend to), it's important for you to know the real deal. 

So, first check what available slots you have in your computer.  If you have several PCI-X's (long white guys), you might opt for a controller that uses one of those, since most new cards that come out will be PCIe.  You should probably try to leave at least one PCI or PCI-X slot free for future needs.  If you have several PCIe's (short-medium black guys), try to reserve the x4's and up for things like extra video cards.  I'd say that the best choice is to use a PCIe-x1 if available.  Make a list, &/or take a clear snapshot of your board's slots before going to the store, and get a salesperson that KNOWS what each one of them is ... if they seem hesitant, IGNORE what they say and ask for a supervisor (or trust this letter :~)

Make sure the controller supports SATA drives (or SAS drives).  I strongly suggest RocketRAID brand.  It comes with extra cables and instructions for setup.

Setting up a RAID array is done before formatting ... once it's set up, it looks like a regular drive to your software. 

Once you've got it in place, reset the Tools > Options > General > Resource Paths in Libronix to include a drive-path to Resources that is on your new "D" (raid5) drive.  I'd suggest you just put it in with the other "user" based Libronix stuff in My Documents, which should ALSO be on drive D.  Delete the path to drive C.   Shut down Libronix.  Now, COPY the entire Resources folder from Program Files \ Libronix DLS \ Resources to your Drive D location.  Make sure the copy process went correctly - right-click>Properties on the orig and final folders to see if the space and #files are the same.  Now, DELETE ALL THE FILES in the drive-C Resources folder.  Restart Libronix, and WAIT for it to re-discover the resources.  Note: the reason you deleted both the path to drive C and the files in the folder is to assure that L looks in the FAST drive for the files ... and to assure that any later add-on resources get stored to the right place.

That's it!

If you want to be really "geeky" about it, then do some "time trials" before and after this change.  That is, pick a word or phrase, and tell Libronix to "Search ALL unlocked Resources" for that phrase.  Do it for 2-3 words or phrases ... pick a common single word like "love" (a gazillion hits), a common phrase like "love of God", and a less-common phrase like "covenant theology" (or whatever).  Use a stopwatch to TIME EACH SEARCH.  Make sure nothing else is happening on your machine at the same time.  Record the results.  Then, after installing your RAID5 drive and moving resources to it, REPEAT the tests and time them.  Then you can puff out your chest (like a REAL geek ;~) and report to us on the Forum how well it worked.

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Redeeming the time (Eph.5:16+Col.4:5) ...
Jim Dean

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