How to increase the startup time of Logos 4

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Posts 38
Francis Jeffries | Forum Activity | Posted: Mon, Mar 21 2011 5:47 AM

I recently decided to play around with defragging the index database.  I tried pay for programs, but they would never defrag the database.  I finally found a program called Power Defragmenter that allows single file defragging. 

I defrgged the database and wow it did speed up the start time and overall performance of the program.  I also defragged my library. 

I don't know it will work for anyone else, but it has worked on two machines I know. 

 

 

Posts 19254
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 21 2011 10:04 AM

Who would want to increase the startup time? I'd want to decrease it. Smile

But cool! I didn't know you could defrag single files. Thanks for the recommendation.

Posts 759
Tobias Lampert | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 21 2011 10:38 AM

Francis Jeffries:
I defrgged the database and wow it did speed up the start time and overall performance of the program.

May I ask which file exactly did you defrag? Sounds interesting!

"Mach's wie Gott - werde Mensch!" | theolobias.de

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Dominick Sela | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 21 2011 11:25 AM

Keep in mind disk defragmentation is NOT recommended if you are using a flash  (solid state) drive. You can Google it to read the in-depth why's, but basically flash drives have a lifetime-limited number of reads/writes before failure, so defrag accelerates end-of-life. Second, since defrag is used to optimize the time necessary for moving parts to locate and read information off a disk drive, and since SSDs have no moving parts, there is no real value to the defrag effort in improved performance.

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Tobias Lampert | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 21 2011 11:27 AM

That's correct, Dominick - thanks for the advice!

"Mach's wie Gott - werde Mensch!" | theolobias.de

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 21 2011 1:05 PM

Okay - defraging a database is not the same thing as defraging a disk. It is a standard database administrator function done periodically to increase the database performance and can be used to fine tune a database for optimal performance. In lay terms it (a) eliminates the supplmental indices built because of running out of "empties" in a segment of an index and (b) allows you to set the primary index for which the data is physically optimized - which access is the fastest. Plus alot of other stuff, of course.

EDIT: re-reading the the original post I suspect he did a partial disk defrag rather than a database defrag. And, yes, bearing in mind Dominic's warning, one can dramatically increase the performance of a program if one has a badly fragmented file that is heavily used.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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Tobias Lampert | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 21 2011 2:09 PM

Yes, I get that - however, same question again: which file(s) would that be regarding L4? Or would defragging the L4 user folder be sufficient to increase speed?

"Mach's wie Gott - werde Mensch!" | theolobias.de

Posts 3163
Dominick Sela | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 21 2011 2:29 PM

MJ. Smith:

Okay - defraging a database is not the same thing as defraging a disk. It is a standard database administrator function done periodically to increase the database performance and can be used to fine tune a database for optimal performance. In lay terms it (a) eliminates the supplemental indices built because of running out of "empties" in a segment of an index and (b) allows you to set the primary index for which the data is physically optimized - which access is the fastest. Plus alot of other stuff, of course.

 

Just to be clear on a few points...I don't think the OP did a database defrag as I read nothing about SQL Server or SQLite tools, and while there are people here who use those tools the typical user here does not.  Second, your point is a lot more relevant for enterprise databases, not ones that sit in a file on a user PC. Third, the SSD has such tremendously fast access time compared to a mechanical disk, I highly doubt that a reorg of a user database of Logos' size would see appreciable increase. Fourth, every time a Logos User has a Rebuild Index done on their computer, the database is, well rebuilt.  I know I have had a rebuild database at least 6 times in the last six months, and since this is NOT a transactional database, how much extra work could really be done that would disorganize the database that much between rebuilds?  We are not experiencing thousands of resource updates and additions on a regular basis.

All that said, even for a database defrag, if you are running it on an SSD you better be sure the performance increase warrants the additional negative impact to remaining end-of-life of the drive.

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Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 21 2011 4:29 PM

Dominick Sela:
All that said, even for a database defrag, if you are running it on an SSD you better be sure the performance increase warrants the additional negative impact to remaining end-of-life of the drive.

The Power defrag author recommends not using it on an SSD.

Dominick Sela:
Fourth, every time a Logos User has a Rebuild Index done on their computer, the database is, well rebuilt.

Under 4.2a there are no permanent supplemental indices as a merge is performed with each resource download. An occasional Rebuild Index should maintain efficiency.

Dave
===

Windows 10 & Android 8

Posts 38
Francis Jeffries | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 22 2011 6:11 AM

Correct if you are utilizing a SSD please do not defrag.  Who's using a SSD?  Overtime large files are not  stored in the continuous space on the Hard Disk Drive.  This causes the read write heads to travel all over the hard disk.  Computer 101.  Smile  Bringing the file together in a continuous space on the the hard drive would speed the access to the file up. Just from my personal observance it did speed up the start time.  If you notice on the startup of Logos 4, the symbol for the program launches just for a second.  I think it accessing/checking the index.  Maybe, maybe not.  if it is then a fragemented index file which is over a GB would take sometime to check.  I don't know, but ...

Posts 759
Tobias Lampert | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 22 2011 6:14 AM

Francis,

Again: Which file(s) exactly did you defrag?

"Mach's wie Gott - werde Mensch!" | theolobias.de

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 22 2011 12:08 PM

Theolobias:
Which file(s) exactly did you defrag?

A generic answer: The files that logically would be most likely to require defragging would be the files containing user generated data. The need to defrag other files would depend upon how Logos handles functions such as highlighting or attaching notes and the state of your hard-drive when a resource was downloaded.

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

Posts 759
Tobias Lampert | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Mar 22 2011 12:20 PM

MJ. Smith:
A generic answer: The files that logically would be most likely to require defragging would be the files containing user generated data. The need to defrag other files would depend upon how Logos handles functions such as highlighting or attaching notes and the state of your hard-drive when a resource was downloaded.

Makes sense to me. Thanks!

"Mach's wie Gott - werde Mensch!" | theolobias.de

Posts 2720
mab | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 23 2011 9:36 AM

I'd be curious to know the relative merits of different defragmentation tools. I'm using Defraggler which seems to do a good job. 

The mind of man is the mill of God, not to grind chaff, but wheat. Thomas Manton | Study hard, for the well is deep, and our brains are shallow. Richard Baxter

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Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 23 2011 4:43 PM

Michael Ballai:
I'm using Defraggler which seems to do a good job.

If it gives a visual representation of the volume/disk with fragmented/defragmented/free space areas etc then you can judge its performance before and after. If it provides further de-fragmenting immediately after one session then it may not be as efficient as another tool but still do a good job. Your tool would appear to fit that description.

An old Win 98 tool provided so many options that it could do your mind serious damageBig Smile eg where Windows files were placed on the disk, where user files went, where specific files went. A continuously running tool (background process) will aim for file performance rather than general defragmentation. The tool mentioned above aims for file defragmentation, therefore you also need a tool for general defragmentation!

 

Dave
===

Windows 10 & Android 8

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