Page 5 of 8 (146 items) « First ... < Previous 3 4 5 6 7 Next > ... Last »
This post has 145 Replies | 14 Followers

Posts 261
Ralph A. Abernethy III | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jul 12 2010 11:21 AM

I would love to be able to read L4 resources on my Kindle 2.  But does anyone seriously think this will ever be a possibility?

Posts 2992
Forum MVP
Jacob Hantla | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jul 12 2010 3:59 PM

Ralph A. Abernethy III:

I would love to be able to read L4 resources on my Kindle 2.  But does anyone seriously think this will ever be a possibility?

You currently can read many of your L4 resources on the Kindle by going in the browser to library.logos.com.

Jacob Hantla
Pastor/Elder, Grace Bible Church
gbcaz.org

Posts 115
Joel J. | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jul 12 2010 4:07 PM

 

How well does that actually work?  Would the $189 price be worth it?

I'm guessing no, but if you have a Kindle and think it'd be worth it, I'd love to be persuaded.

I will probably wait for the next model to see what is coming next, but who knows.

 

joel

Posts 376
Dan Sheppard | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jul 12 2010 10:20 PM

Joel J.:

 

How well does that actually work?  Would the $189 price be worth it?

I'm guessing no, but if you have a Kindle and think it'd be worth it, I'd love to be persuaded.

I will probably wait for the next model to see what is coming next, but who knows.

 

Joel-

 

The Kindle is not a device designed to access the Internet.  Therefore, in using it to access Logos books from the library.logos.com is not FAST.

 

I attempted this, just to see for myself, what it worked like.

Went to the Internet site on my Kindle.  Selected a book, by using search and typing in "Concordia", which is one of my commentaries.

It SLOWLY came up.  I slowly move through the pages, to get to the reading part.  You have to use the little "square mouse" in the Kindle.  I moved it to the "right arrow" which you use in Kindle, to advance page.  Except here, it takes 4 clicks.

It takes 12 seconds to advance one page.  The pages are grouped, so the introductory section is 3 pages.  I can use the "next page" button on the Kindle, to advance WITHIN THOSE 3 PAGES, but you must the 4-click mouse, to go to the next section.

Oops!  My battery is draining quicker.  The book on Kindle says it is about 125kB.  Each time I click the mouse button to advance, it runs through the 125kb again and again.

Concordia Commentaries have thorough analysis in the original language.  So in this case, the Book of Daniel, there should be Hebrew, but instead, lots of little boxes, due to the inability to display Hebrew fonts.

The hot links do show in the commentary.  Clicking on one, it DOES GO to the appropriate place in Daniel.  I clicked the BACK button and it did take me back to my originating point, so that DOES work.

The lettering is great, the charts come into Kindle great.

 

My assessment is that, if you want a means to read lots of books and have lightning fast delivery of books you buy online from Amazon, then Kindle is a good bet; especially at $189.

If you are wanting access to your Logos stuff (and assuming you are wanting to use a method other than your computer for reading), then I would either recommend an iPhone for the same relative amount of money (although the screen is small, the iPhone app from Logos is getting better and better), or else buy an iPad, which gives you even better functionality.

Good luck on your decision!

 

 

Posts 2279
Andy | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Jul 12 2010 10:48 PM

Joel J.:

How well does that actually work?

For the benefit of international customers, it should be noted that this will only work in the US. The internet browser (mark experimental) is not currently available internationally.

This is why I am so eager for Logos to consider introducing an export feature to enable books to be read on the Kindle/other e-readers. In an ideal world, it would be fantastic to be able to import notes and clippings from the aforementioned e-reader. Having said this, I am not greedy, I will settle for just being able to read my books on the Kindle Smile.

Not having this functionality does effect my purchasing habits. I was considering buying the NT Wright triology (recently on prepub) but didn't fancy reading 400+ page book on a computer screen. In the end, I bought the series in paperback (for a slightly higher cost).

I am considering purchasing an iPad over the next few months, but would still like to be able to read my collection via the Kindle. I do not see the iPad replacing my Kindle. As great as the iPad seems, the Kindle is (in my opinion) a more comfortable and 'authentic' (whatever that means) reading experience.

I see the iPad and Kindle serving slightly different purposes and it would be great to have functionality on both.

 

 

Posts 2992
Forum MVP
Jacob Hantla | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 14 2010 12:39 PM

Joel J.:

How well does that actually work?  Would the $189 price be worth it?

I'm guessing no, but if you have a Kindle and think it'd be worth it, I'd love to be persuaded.

I will probably wait for the next model to see what is coming next, but who knows.

I wouldn't buy a Kindle in order to view Logos on it. You'll probably be disappointed. But the Kindle is a good reading device due to the e-ink, connectedness, and long battery life. If you already own a Kindle you'll find that the ability to connect to Logos via library.logos.com is a great benefit.

Jacob Hantla
Pastor/Elder, Grace Bible Church
gbcaz.org

Posts 261
Ralph A. Abernethy III | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 14 2010 3:12 PM

I'm sorry.  I wasn't clear in expressing my wish to read Logos resources on my KIndle.  What I meant was that I wish I could load certain L4 resources to my Kindle so I could simply read them.  I prefer the e-ink display, as well as the size of the screen, to that of my ITouch or Android.  

Posts 261
Ralph A. Abernethy III | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 14 2010 3:13 PM

But that's probably not going to happen, I would imagine.

Posts 115
Joel J. | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 29 2010 9:17 AM

 

I agree.  As a musician, I always understood that you could "format shift" from CD to MP3, as long as you didn't use both at the same time.  In other words, you couldn't buy a CD, make MP3s, then sell the CD.  That is obviously copyright infringement.  But if it's for yourself, and you don't use both at the same time, I have always understood that to be fine.

Likewise, for personal use, I doubt that publishers care if you see it on your screen, print it out on paper, or print it on e-ink.  As long as you buy the product and don't resell or distribute it, I think most publishers would see the common sense of that.  Some people simply can't read well on the computer and need an easier-to-read format.

In fact, I have not purchased some Logos books because it is too hard on my eyes to read.  Publishers probably know that if they encouraged printing to Kindle, for example, they'd have more business.  I just can't read some of this stuff on a computer screen.  

I don't even own a Kindle right now, but I'm speaking theoretically.

Posts 168
Bill Gordon | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Aug 2 2010 12:49 PM

Michael Childs:

Hello Michael,

I own both a Kindle and an iPad. I agree with you 100%. The iPad is much better for Bible study, but the Kindle is "a thousand times better" when I just want to read a book.

Bill

Rob Suggs:
It's built for reading, and it's great for that.

That is the point.  That is why any book that you intend to read extensively, from cover to cover, will be better on a kindle than the "big screen."  Now for Bible study, reference work, searching, etc. there is nothing like Logos on the computer.  For reading, the Kindle is a thousand times better.

People are already reading their Logos resources on the Kindle.  It is just awkward to do so now.  The Kindle is such a popular format that I think Logos will eventually be more accommodating to it.

 

Posts 2889
Mike Childs | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Aug 15 2010 2:36 PM

Ralph A. Abernethy III:

I'm sorry.  I wasn't clear in expressing my wish to read Logos resources on my KIndle.  What I meant was that I wish I could load certain L4 resources to my Kindle so I could simply read them.  I prefer the e-ink display, as well as the size of the screen, to that of my ITouch or Android.  

Some people export a section of a Logos book as a pdf, (maybe convert the pdf to a mobi file) and then read it on the Kindle.  It works very well. 

It does seem to me as long as you don't share it, and delete it when you have read it, that this is fair use.  Others disagree.  You have to decide for yourself if this is ethical.

However, people are reading their Logos library on the Kindle.

"In all cases, the Church is to be judged by the Scripture, not the Scripture by the Church," John Wesley

Posts 3810
spitzerpl | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Aug 15 2010 3:39 PM

Michael Childs:
It does seem to me as long as you don't share it, and delete it when you have read it, that this is fair use.  Others disagree.  You have to decide for yourself if this is ethical.

With the direction Logos is going with the printing feature and wide-ranged availability, I think this is true.With the beta version's print feature it is super easy to save a large chunk of text as a PDF. Logos has said you can use the resources on as many computers and platforms as you would like so long as you are not sharing. My guess is that they want you to get the most of the program and the investment with them you have made. If exporting to PDF with integrity allows that to happen, I personally don't see a problem.

Of course, I'm not one of the publishers or authors :-)

Posts 492
R. Mansfield | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Aug 17 2010 9:59 AM

This kind of use clearly falls under the principles set forth in the Fair Use Provision of the 1976 Copyright Act, despite the fact that 34 years ago, the kinds of devices we are using were not directly addressed. It's not even an ethical question at this point. It's simply allowed. This includes not just the creating of PDFs for your own use, but also using material that you have in Bible software in education settings such as using a data projector to share images with a group. Content can even be copied onto handouts for educational purposes; however, if a publisher has not granted permission for this kind of distribution, all handouts have to be gathered back up when the class session is over.

RMansfield@mac.com
http://thislamp.com 
youtube.com/user/rfmansfield
twitter/thislamp
facebook.com/rmansfield

Posts 3810
spitzerpl | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Aug 17 2010 10:01 AM

R. Mansfield:
This kind of use clearly falls under the principles set forth in the Fair Use Provision of the 1976 Copyright Act, despite the fact that 34 years ago, the kinds of devices we are using were not directly addressed.

Thanks for the info!

Posts 456
Roger Feenstra | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Aug 19 2010 8:30 AM

Philip Spitzer:
With the beta version's print feature it is super easy to save a large chunk of text as a PDF.

I'm using beta, but I'm not quite sure how this works (That is, saving text into PDF).

Elder/Pastor, Hope Now Bible Church, Fresno CA

Posts 5337
Kevin Becker | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Aug 19 2010 10:04 AM

Roger Feenstra:
I'm using beta, but I'm not quite sure how this works (That is, saving text into PDF).

Use Print/Export and a PDF printer driver (you will likely have to download one).

Posts 168
Bill Gordon | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Aug 21 2010 6:39 AM

You can also copy and paste a limited amount of text into Word. It is then easy to convert the text into a Kindle book. I will sometimes do this so I can listen to a book that I purchased from Logos while driving. The Kindle does a good job of converting text to speech. Being able to listen to my Logos books on my Kindle gives those books greater value than the same book in print. As a result, I buy more books from Logos than I would otherwise.

As I understand the Logos license, it goes with the user and not the machine. The Logos website summaries it as follows: "The short version is this: "The license goes with the user. Every user must purchase their own package. If you have a work machine and a laptop and they are both yours for your personal use, you may load it on both for your personal use - because the license goes with the user." Can you purchase one package and have two people use it? No. The license goes with the user. The license is a single user license."
http://www.logos.com/ArticleViewer/2090 

This enlightened approach to the software license is one reason why I spend so much money on Logos products.

In an interesting development, the Library of Congress recently relaxed the rules on "text to speech" and copyrights.
http://www.dailyfinance.com/story/media/how-library-of-congresss-digital-copyright-exemptions-affect-e/19569018/ 

Bill

Posts 115
Joel J. | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Aug 22 2010 8:35 PM

 

Does anyone know how the new Kindle 3G "webkit" browser will be?  Any chance that it could be faster than the previous browser?

 

Joel

Posts 115
Joel J. | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Aug 23 2010 4:46 PM

 

Just to clarify, I am curious about the speed of the new Kindle 3G browser?  Apparently, it's a webkit browser (which is used by Safari), and with the faster refresh rates, I wonder if it'd be possible to access library.logos.com at a reasonable speed.  

12 seconds does seem too slow for most situations, but 2 or 3 seconds might be doable.

If anyone gets to try one, please let us curious folks know about the speed of the new browser.

Posts 168
Bill Gordon | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Aug 25 2010 6:23 AM

Joel,

I found the following review of the Kindle 3 browser: "Its web browser, now based on WebKit (like modern smartphone browsers) is much improved, but due to the limitations of the hardware (most importantly the greyscale e-ink display) it's easily bested by any modern smartphone. The browser is listed as "experimental," and aptly so." http://www.fastcompany.com/1684575/wanted-amazon-kindle-3rd-generation 

Bill

Joel J.:

Lust to clarify, I am curious about the speed of the new Kindle 3G browser?  Apparently, it's a webkit browser (which is used by Safari), and with the faster refresh rates, I wonder if it'd be possible to access library.logos.com at a reasonable speed.  

12 seconds does seem too slow for most situations, but 2 or 3 seconds might be doable.

If anyone gets to try one, please let us curious folks know about the speed of the new browser.

Page 5 of 8 (146 items) « First ... < Previous 3 4 5 6 7 Next > ... Last » | RSS