Best Modern Commentary:Amillinial ?

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Posts 241
Kendall Sholtess | Forum Activity | Posted: Wed, Jan 16 2013 7:59 PM

Looking through my commentaries, I find dispensational, historic premil, etc. But I cannot find one from an amillenial perspective.

 Does anyone know a good commentary from an amillenialist perspective?

Posts 18727
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jan 16 2013 8:09 PM

Are you looking for a whole commentary series, a commentary on a particular book of the Bible, or a one-volume commentary on the whole Bible?

Posts 6498
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jan 16 2013 8:48 PM

Orienta:

Looking through my commentaries, I find dispensational, historic premil, etc. But I cannot find one from an amillenial perspective.

 Does anyone know a good commentary from an amillenialist perspective?

I don't necessarily agree with the interpretation, but Ray Summer's Worthy is the Lamb is amillenial.  Also BECNT Revelation & NIGTC Revelation are amillenial.  There's another one that I hope will be available individually but is yet to come out of prepub.  It's titled The Apocalypse of St. John: The Greek Text with Introduction, Commentary and Notes, by F. J. A. Hort.

There's one (not available in Logos) that is amillenial: The Avenging of the Apostles and Prophets by Arthur Ogden (My go to Rev Commentary and favorite one thus far) and you can also get the PDF version of "The Days of Vengeance" by David Chilton.  Look it up on Google.  Read also Revelation: Four Views.

Last but not least, you can buy the PDF and then convert it to Personal Book: Revelation and The First Century by American Vision.  Preterist but since it's not "futurist" then it's by implication "amillenial." (hopefully Logos will publish it soon).  I hope this helps.

Blessings!

DAL

Ps. The Handwriting on the Wall a commentary on the book of Daniel by American Vision can supplement your amillenial commentaries too.

Posts 241
Kendall Sholtess | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jan 16 2013 8:53 PM

Well, let's say a commentary series and a commentary on Revelation and/or the prophetic books.

I probably cannot afford a whole series. I recently have been studying Isaiah, and had to read a dispensational commentary on it for a class. It stretches credibility. Having recently aligned more with the amillenial approach, I suppose what I am looking for is a little deeper explanation of Isaiah and possibly Revelation.

Posts 6498
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jan 16 2013 9:06 PM

Orienta:

Well, let's say a commentary series and a commentary on Revelation and/or the prophetic books.

I probably cannot afford a whole series. I recently have been studying Isaiah, and had to read a dispensational commentary on it for a class. It stretches credibility. Having recently aligned more with the amillenial approach, I suppose what I am looking for is a little deeper explanation of Isaiah and possibly Revelation.

The Book of Isaiah by Edward J. Young is a good one.  Also College Press NIV Commentary on Isaiah and Daniel are other options plus the one I mentioned "Handwriting on the Wall."

DAL

Ps. Might want to also consider this eye opener (at least it was for me). Jesus v. Jerusalem: A Commentary on Luke 9:51–20:26, Jesus’ Lawsuit Against Israel 

Available in Logos format too.

Posts 390
Alain Maashe | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jan 16 2013 9:12 PM

DAL:

  Also BECNT Revelation & NIGTC Revelation are amillenial.  

The BECNT by Osborne is not amillennial , the author is an eclectic premillennialist.

"This commentary is quite similar to Beale’s except for the centrality of the futurist approach (also similar to Ladd, Beasley-Murray, Michaels, and Mounce)" p. 22

Posts 241
Kendall Sholtess | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jan 16 2013 9:18 PM

 

 Ok, that helps a lot. The one by Edward J. Young I have seen referenced in other commentaries. And furthermore, a cursory examination of the front page stimulates interest. I think I am going to choose that one.

 Thanks for the suggestions!

Posts 18727
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jan 16 2013 9:44 PM

For Revelation, here is one that others have recommended (not available in Logos yet) but I am not personally familiar with it:

http://community.logos.com/forums/t/37292.aspx

One that I like a lot (also not in Logos):

Unveiling Empire: Reading Revelation Then and Now by Wes Howard-Brook & Anthony Gwyther 

Posts 476
elnwood | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jan 16 2013 11:02 PM

I recommend Steve Gregg's Revelation, Four Views: A Parallel Commentary. It has a commentary on all the major views on Revelation, cites its sources well, and has a really nice annotated bibliography.

A quick look in Jim Rosscup's Commentaries for Biblical Expositors gives the following amillennial commentaries:

Isaiah: Motyer, Ostwalt, Young, Leupold.
Jeremiah: Thompson, Laetsch, Craigie, Driver, Harrison.
Ezekiel: Block, Taylor.
Daniel: Young, Leupold, Baldwin.
Minor prophets: Laetsch, Keil/Delitzsch, Stuart.
Hosea: Andersen/Freedman, Garrett, Garland, Kidner.
Amos: G. V. Smith, Veldkamp, Garland, Motyer
Micah: Bruce Waltke
Zephaniah: Motyer.
Haggai: Motyer, Baldwin.
Revelation: Beale, Kistemaker, Beckwith, Aune, Mounce, Beasley-Murray, Morris, Hendriksen.

Posts 241
Kendall Sholtess | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jan 16 2013 11:47 PM

Elnwood,

  Thanks! The list is helpful. I am going to take good note of that.

I wish Logos would do one thing: on the product page give a summary of the theological positions each author espouses.

 I have returned or exchanged many items due to this problem. It's almost impossible to tell. Although a variety if opinions is necessary in research, nevertheless I'd be so happy to know if someone is a rabid dogmatist in some area that I feel useless to deal with, so I won't waste my time.

Posts 117
Dennis Parish | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 17 2013 7:24 AM

On a more general level, a good amillinial overview of apocalyptic literature is In God's Time, by Craig C. Hill. Addressed to pastors and laity, it carries endorsements by Jurgen Moltmann, John J. Collins, Eugene Peterson, Graham Stanton, Luke Timothy Johnson, Pheme Perkins, and Walter Brueggemann.

Not in Logos. 

Posts 382
Sacrifice | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 17 2013 8:12 AM

Here are some books on Amil on on other items related to it (some like Mathison are Post-Mill, but informative on the hyper bunch ...., etc.). Some of these are not in L.5

 

 

Beale, G. K. The Book of Revelation: A Commentary on the Greek Text. New International Greek Testament Commentary. Grand Rapids, MI; Carlisle, Cumbria: W.B. Eerdmans; Paternoster Press, 1999.

.....The Temple and the Church's Mission: A Biblical Theology of the Dwelling Place of God (New Studies in Biblical Theology). IVP Academic, 2004.

Hendriksen, William. More Than Conquerors: An Interpretation of the Book of Revelation. Baker Books, 1998.

Hill, Charles E. Regnum Caelorum: Patterns of Millennial Thought in Early Christianity. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 2001.

Hoekema, Anthony A. The Bible and the Future. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1994.

Johnson, Dennis E. Triumph of the Lamb: A Commentary on Revelation. P & R Publishing, 2001.

Kline, Meredith G. God, Heaven, and Har Magedon: A Covenantal Tale of Cosmos and Telos. Wipf & Stock Publishers, 2006.

Mathison, Keith A. (Editor). When Shall These Things Be?: A Reformed Response to Hyper-Preterism. P & R Publishing, 2004.

Poythress, Vern S. The Returning King: A Guide to the Book of Revelation. P & R Publishing, 2000.

Riddlebarger, Kim. A Case for Amillennialism: Understanding the End Times 2003.

Venema, Cornelis P. Promise of the Future. Banner of Truth, 2000.

Vos, Geerhardus. Pauline Eschatology. P & R Publishing, 1979

 

Yours In Christ

Posts 51
David E Haeuser | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 17 2013 11:43 AM

Lenski would also be amillenial.

Posts 2827
Michael Childs | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 17 2013 4:48 PM

There are many good suggestions being given.

My opinion is that on the book of Revelation, it is hard to beat G. K. Beale's The Book of Revelation in the New International Greek Testament Commentary set for an amillenial perspective.  It would be my pick.

"In all cases, the Church is to be judged by the Scripture, not the Scripture by the Church," John Wesley

Posts 4625
RIP
Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 17 2013 5:54 PM

David E Haeuser:

Lenski would also be amillenial.

Yes!            Lenski!            I certainly recommend Lenski!                       Actually I have most of the major commentary sets, and besides Lenski, my favourite is Louis Brighton the Concordia Commentary on Revelation!

                      amillenial, of course!     Here's a clipping in case you are interested....    ask for more if you so desire ...   *smile*            Peace to all!

Divine Confirmation of the Message (

1:4–6

)

1:4–5). In these words John names the triune God: Father, Spirit, and Jesus Christ. At first glance it would appear that already in the first phrase, "the One Who Is and Who Was and Who Is Coming," there is a representation of the triune God. Both Oecumenius18 (sixth century) and Andreas19 (sixth century) in their Greek commentaries on Revelation interpret it thus: the "One Who Is" is the Father; the one "Who Was" is the Son, the Logos; and the one "Who Is Coming" is the Comforter, the Spirit. Victorinus (third century) in his Latin commentary apparently believed that this entire threefold first phrase is not a reference to the Trinity but to Jesus Christ,20 and Athanasius also so interpreted this first three-part title.21 However, neither of those ancient interpretations is accepted by this commentary. It is better to hear 1:4–5 as naming three distinct persons: (1) "the One Who Is and Who Was and Who Is Coming"; (2) the seven Spirits; and (3) Jesus Christ. Each refers to one of the persons of the Trinity.ὁ ὤν ("the One Who Is") in the phrase ὁ ὢν καὶ ὁ ἦν καὶ ὁ ἐρχόμενος ("the One Who Is and Who Was and Who Is Coming") leads one to the LXX’s rendering of the holy name (the tetragrammaton, Yahweh) in Exodus 3. In Ex 3:14 the LXX translates אֶהְיֶה אֲשֶׁר אֶהְיֶה ("I Am Who I Am") with ἐγώ εἰμι ὁ ὤν ("I Am the One Who Is"). After God identifies himself, he then tells Moses to say to the children of Israel that, in the LXX’s rendering, ὁ ὤν ("the One Who Is") sent him.22 In Rev 1:4 John follows the LXX rendering of the holy name by his use of ὁ ὤν; in the context of 1:4–6ὁ ὤν then refers to God the Father

These verses give a trinitarian imprimatur by which God himself confirms the validity of the message of Revelation. It is given in the form of a greeting benediction in which John speaks the blessing of God’s grace and peace to his recipients, the seven churches.

The trinitarian formula is presented in the words "the One Who Is and Who Was and Who Is Coming, and from the seven Spirits … and from Jesus Christ" (

First, the revelation comes from God the Father.

But what are the referents of

ὁ ἦν ("Who Was") and ὁ ἐρχόμενος ("Who Is Coming"), for these expressions do not appear in the LXX’s rendering of Exodus 3? Could ὁ ἐρχόμενος ("Who Is Coming") be in the same or a similar tradition as the rendering of אֶהְיֶה ("I Am") with a future tense, as Aquila and Theodotion do in Ex 3:14?24 (Here in Rev 1:4 John uses the present participle ἐρχόμενος ["is coming"] in a future sense since it contrasts with the imperfect past tense of ἦν ["was"] and with the present tense of ὤν

["is"].) That might possibly be part of the answer, but the full tripartite title seems to be unprecedented.

John, in his own way, uses

ὁ ὢν καὶ ὁ ἦν καὶ ὁ ἐρχόμενος ("the One Who Is and Who Was and Who Is Coming") for the holy name in Exodus 3. He takes ὁ ὤν ("the One Who Is") from the LXX of Ex 3:14 and then expands it by adding καὶ ὁ ἦν καὶ ὁ ἐρχόμενος ("and Who Was and Who Is Coming"). By so doing he states that the ever present One is continually present now, as he was in the past and as he always will be in the future. The entire three-part phrase, then, is really a rendition ofאֶהְיֶה ("I Am," which is in the Hebrew Qal imperfect tense) in Ex 3:14, which is God’s own explanation for the tetragrammaton,יהוה, the holy name, Yahweh (Ex 3:13–16). John may not have been the only one to interpret the holy name in this way, for a rabbinic tradition also interprets אֶהְיֶה

as "I am He Who has been, Who is now, and Who will be in the future."25

Why does John have

ὁ ὢν καὶ ὁ ἦν καὶ ὁ ἐρχόμενος ("the One Who Is and Who Was and Who Is Coming") in the nominative after ἀπό

("from") instead of the genitive that normally follows that preposition? It is for the sake of emphasis. Whether John did this consciously in deference to the holy name, because to have used an oblique case would have necessitated a vocalized change of that name,26 can only be surmised. Certainly John, because of his Jewish background, would be aware of Jewish practices in deference toward the holy name. But more likely, if not also in addition, John wanted to make and emphasize a theological truth that the Father is the first among equals. The Father, while equal in essence with the Spirit and

Brighton, L. A. (1999). Revelation. Concordia Commentary (pp 39–40). St. Louis, MO: Concordia Pub. House.

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

Posts 1639
Allen Browne | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 17 2013 5:57 PM

Michael Wilcock's little Revelation volume from the BST series is quite a good introduction to an amil. view too.

Posts 602
Bill Anderson | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 17 2013 7:25 PM

5 Solas:

Here are some books on Amil on on other items related to it (some like Mathison are Post-Mill, but informative on the hyper bunch ...., etc.). Some of these are not in L.5

***

Hendriksen, William. More Than Conquerors: An Interpretation of the Book of Revelation. Baker Books, 1998.

***

Johnson, Dennis E. Triumph of the Lamb: A Commentary on Revelation. P & R Publishing, 2001.

Kline, Meredith G. God, Heaven, and Har Magedon: A Covenantal Tale of Cosmos and Telos. Wipf & Stock Publishers, 2006.

***

Riddlebarger, Kim. A Case for Amillennialism: Understanding the End Times 2003.

***

Vos, Geerhardus. Pauline Eschatology. P & R Publishing, 1979

Hendriksen's commentary is very readable and to the point. Johnson and Kline were seminary professors of mine and I went to seminary with Riddlebarger. And we all cut our teeth on the work of Geerhardus Vos.

Posts 6498
DAL | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 17 2013 9:14 PM

I have Hendricksen's "More Than Conquerors" but it's in Spanish and in my Logos 5 Spanish Premier package.  I wonder why is not available in English.  Logos 5 in Spanish also came with some NICNT volumes in Spanish; e.g. Hebrews F.F. Bruce, Epistles of John by I. Howard Marshall, Acts by F.F. Bruce and 1 Corinthians by Gordon Fee.  I wish they would make all of them available in Spanish, it would be very nice.  Some day I might purchase the English sets.

DAL

Posts 241
Kendall Sholtess | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jan 18 2013 1:50 AM

 

  Wow Milford! You guys are setting me up for the next few years' readingWink. I had no idea there was so much available.

Posts 142
Michael Sullivan | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jan 18 2013 3:57 AM

The People's Bible from NPH and Concordia Commentary series is what I would suggest.  They are both available on Logos.

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