Daniel Sermon Series - Which Logos commentary would you use?

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JoshInRI | Forum Activity | Posted: Thu, Jul 25 2013 9:00 AM

Hi everyone,

I am reading through, studying Walvoord in class (Mdiv Student), and ramping up (Holy Spirit please hear my prayer) my first ever Sermon Series in Daniel. 

I want to pull away just a little (from what could be for some listeners) the overwhelming prophesy portion to focus on how God used a man of prayer, integrity, and Godly devotion from his teens to his 80's during years of persecution and trial (showing how vital this important book is for our time). 

What readable understandable clear LOGOS commentary/book have you used or would you use in your extra-Biblical study please? 

I am a premil pretrib leaning conservative Baptist student looking to expand upon some of the key Daniel stories we can all recall form childhood but never had all the details filled in or expanded like they should have been.  Any critics or fans of the Boice book on Daniel - you would be welcome to detail your thoughts for me.  I will be looking at what I hope will be a light Biblical study in Daniel from Chuck Swindoll to set the tone for the series as well.  I hope to do expositional preaching only and have not selected the texts yet though Daniel's friends in the fire, The Lion's Den, The Writing on the Wall will certainly all be primary focuses.

I am curious how many of you feel that it was Jesus Himself who was in the fire with Daniel's 3 friends.  Nebuchadnezzar certainly didnt know if was THE Son of God of course. 

I apologize in advance for NOT specifically citing the Biblical references as I am aware they are primary and the REAL starting point.

If you respond to this, please cite a Logos book specifically to keep this a logos searching post and reply please....thanks.

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Alan Macgregor | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 25 2013 11:23 AM

Joshua

I led a Bible Study in Daniel just a couple of years ago, as well as preaching through Daniel 1-6 about ten years ago. I also preached a single sermon on Daniel as "A Man of Faith" as part of a series on OT characters about eight years ago.

I did a Senior Honours OT course on the Aramaic portions of Daniel at the University of Glasgow in 1990-1, as part of my BD, with the late Professor Robert P. Carroll. I was the only student, so it was a bit exposed! But a wonderful, if testing, experience.

The Logos resources which I found most useful ( though I did refer to others) were:

Leupold Old Testament Commentaries: Daniel

Word Biblical Commentary, Volume 30: Daniel

Both are available in Logos.

Enjoy Daniel.

Every blessing

Alan

iMac Retina 5K, 27": 4GHz; 16GB RAM;MacOS 10.12.2; 1TB FD; Logos 7

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iPhone 5s 32GB iOS 10.2

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JoshInRI | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 25 2013 11:52 AM

Thanks so much Sir. 

God bless you, your church, and your ministry as you serve God and others.

Posts 476
elnwood | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 25 2013 11:54 AM

I like Tremper Longman's NIVAC on Daniel. Treats Daniel as a Wisdom book.

Posts 1699
JoshInRI | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 25 2013 12:04 PM

Thanks Elnwood...those commentaries are on my wishlist.  I am resisting buying this one volume til I can get the whole set someday.  Glory to God...Jesus Lead On!

Posts 1541
John Kight | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 25 2013 12:35 PM

I recently read through Stephen Miller's commentary on Daniel. I thought that it was rather well written and easy to follow. It had great information theologically, and provided frequent nuggets of application. It would probably be helpful.

Miller, Stephen R. Daniel. Vol. 18. The New American Commentary. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1994.

For book reviews and more visit sojotheo.com 

Posts 1929
Joseph Turner | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 25 2013 2:52 PM

You could also peruse Denver Seminary's Annotated Commentary and Reference recommendations that I have put in PBB here.  The OT section is particularly well annotated. 

Disclaimer:  I hate using messaging, texting, and email for real communication.  If anything that I type to you seems like anything other than humble and respectful, then I have not done a good job typing my thoughts.

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JoshInRI | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 27 2013 9:23 AM

John, that's awesome.  I have that in my collection already.  Cool beans.

Posts 1799
Kenneth Neighoff | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 27 2013 9:25 AM

The New Beacon Bible Commentary on Daniel is very good.

Posts 1699
JoshInRI | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 27 2013 9:29 AM

Mr. Turner...thanks.  I will look at your Bibliography as well.  Everyone reading these responses - thanks for helping out the neophyte preacher wannabe.  A series on Daniel is daunting to me.

Perhaps if God is gracious I will one day be someone's assistant pastor.  I can only pray and hope.  I am fortunate to have an understanding encouraging tough Pastor.  How I long to edify God's people and please God The Father, My Pastor, and bless our congregation in the months ahead.

Glory to God....Jesus Lead On!

Posts 1699
JoshInRI | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 27 2013 9:47 AM

Kenneth (Sir), I will look at the Daniel commentary though I am struck by the Wesleyan slant that it gives.  Does the commentator believe it was Jesus in the fire with the three young men - Daniel's friends, for example?  Not that this is huge litmus test for anything but I am curious.

Blessings,

Joshua 

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John Fidel | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 27 2013 10:20 AM

Two more homiletical commentaries are those by James Montgomery Boice and Preaching the Word Commentary. They may compliment those already suggested.

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JoshInRI | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 27 2013 11:01 AM

Thanks Mr. Fidel - I just bought the Boice and (because of your suggestion) just bought The Daniel commentary from Preaching the Word series.

I am all done with my purchases...now for the earnest real genuine must-do-it beginning...picking 4 texts from this key crucial Book and diving into exploration and exegesis and application.

Come Holy Spirit Come!

Blessings,

Joshua

p.s. Already I sense that this Book gives us all hope as it points toward Jesus and His Kingdom which shall never end."
Ride On King Jesus!

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Kenneth Neighoff | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 27 2013 12:22 PM

Joshua Lieder:

Kenneth (Sir), I will look at the Daniel commentary though I am struck by the Wesleyan slant that it gives.  Does the commentator believe it was Jesus in the fire with the three young men - Daniel's friends, for example?  Not that this is huge litmus test for anything but I am curious.

Blessings,

Joshua 

Joshua,

here is the material in question.

■ 25 The king’s eyewitness report reveals the remarkable turn that the story has taken. He sees four men who are walking … , unbound and unharmed (v 25). These details announce the miraculous reversal that has taken place. The bound have become unbound, the harmed are unharmed, and the three have become four.

Most amazing to Nebuchadnezzar is the fourth person. He identifies this person as one who looks like a son of the gods (v 25). This phrase could be, and has been, translated as “the Son of God” (KJV). If translated this way, the phrase might indicate an appearance of Christ before his incarnation. But this is likely assuming too much for the context. The word like (dāmēh) suggests the king saw something representing deity to him. Later, in v 28, he identifies the being as an “angel” or messenger of God.

A significant point of the king’s observations is that this all takes place in the fire (v 25). Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego were not delivered from the fire. They were delivered in the midst of the fire.


Jim Edlin, Daniel: A Commentary in the Wesleyan Tradition (, New Beacon Bible CommentaryKansas City, MO: Beacon Hill Press of Kansas City, 2009), 99.

The parallels between the opening and closing decrees accentuate the differences. The first decree called for honor for the image while the second calls for respect for the God of Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego. No one may say anything against this God (v 29). This declaration provides protection for worship of God, but it does not demand allegiance. Another difference is the motive for the decree. None is given in the first decree. The second, however, points out that the reason for this decree is that no other god can save in this way (v 29). This is an acknowledgment of the uniqueness of Israel’s God and an allusion to the first commandment. It also affirms once more the ability of God to save (nĕzal). This has been the central issue in the chapter. Nebuchadnezzar raised it in v 15. The God he asked about in that context revealed himself through Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego.

Nebuchadnezzar’s final action is to reward the three Jews. The term promote (zĕlaḥ) means “to prosper” (v 30). So the precise nature of their promotion could have included monetary gifts as well as added influence. The final irony of the story is noted here. Those who were thrown down are now raised up. In the end steadfast conviction did bring blessing.


Jim Edlin, Daniel: A Commentary in the Wesleyan Tradition (, New Beacon Bible CommentaryKansas City, MO: Beacon Hill Press of Kansas City, 2009), 100-01.

God delivers in the midst of the fire as well as from it. The drama of Dan 3 takes an ugly turn that readers may not be fully prepared to absorb. The three faithful witnesses of God are actually thrown into a burning furnace, helpless and hopeless. They are bound by Babylon’s strongest men and pitched into an inferno heated to its maximum temperature. Burning flesh, anguished cries, and excruciating pain are images that pass through the mind of the reader as their execution is meticulously portrayed.

God did not save his servants from the blast of flames. He did, however, come to them in the midst of the furnace. Miraculously Isaiah’s word picture takes on literal reality. “When you walk through the fire, you will not be burned; the flames will not set you ablaze” (Isa 43:2). God chooses to step into the fire with the three Jewish men in the form of an angel (Dan 3:28). Nebuchadnezzar said it looked like a son of the gods (v 25). An apocryphal addition to Daniel tried to imagine what this must have been like. It says that the angel “drove the fiery flame out of the furnace, and made the inside of the furnace as though a moist wind were whistling through it” (Sg Three 26–27).
The irony of the fire is that this is the very element that is so often associated with the God of Israel. From the midst of fire God spoke to Moses (Exod 3:2) and to Israel (Deut 4:12). Fire indicates God’s presence on Mount Sinai (Exod 19:18) and even describes his nature (Deut 4:24). God exercises absolute authority over fire by employing it for judgment (Gen 19:23) and to display his power among pagans (1 Kgs 18:38). Even God’s appearance is described in terms of fire (Ezek 1:27).

A popular metaphor for God’s greatest act of deliverance, the exodus from Egypt, is that of being brought “out of the iron-smelting furnace” (Deut 4:20; 1 Kgs 8:51; Jer 11:4). The exile is also described as a fire experience. It is called “the furnace of affliction” where God refines his people (Isa 48:10). Perhaps the reader should not be surprised that the rescue took place in the midst of fire.
God’s promise to the faithful is that he will “be with” them (Exod 3:12; Ps 23:4–5; Isa 43:1–3; Jer 1:8; Matt 28:20). It is not to keep them away from all harm and danger. He may protect them from unpleasant things in life, or he may come to them in the midst of them.
The ordeals of life provide opportunity for witness to God’s power in the world. The story of Dan 3 fulfills the message of the dream in ch 2. “In the time of those kings,” such as Nebuchadnezzar, God sets up his kingdom that will not be destroyed (2:44). Like a rock smashing a statue, the unmatched power of God’s kingdom overrules the pretentious power of Nebuchadnezzar. Three representatives of that kingdom are delivered from the furnace of an earthly kingdom. The ostentatious display of magnificence by Nebuchadnezzar is revealed for what it is, a statue with clay feet.

A very impressive and broad audience witnesses the dramatic rescue of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego. It all takes place in a grand public forum. Nebuchadnezzar and his entire entourage of government officials are present. These not only witness the uncompromising faith of three Jews but, more importantly, witness the unassailable faithfulness of God.

Unwittingly the king provided the elaborate stage for the display of God’s power. He summoned all the peoples, nations and men of every language (v 7). Nebuchadnezzar precipitated the crisis with his decree, interrogated the three, and ordered their execution. He is also the first to observe the miracle of four men walking around in the fire, unbound and unharmed and testify to it (v 25). His highest courtiers provide additional eyewitness testimony as they examine the bodies, heads, and robes of the three Jews and find no trace of fire (v 27).
To his credit Nebuchadnezzar is also the first to acknowledge the faithful character of the three Jews and the divine workings in his midst. He identifies three essential characteristics of a convincing witness. These are unshakable trust in God, defiance of the opposition, and willingness to give up their lives rather than compromise their convictions (v 28). Nebuchadnezzar also testifies to the faithfulness of the God of these men. He acknowledges that no other god can save in this way (v 29).


Such testimony does not emerge without trial. The scripture affirms that the testing of one’s faith is of great value. It is a key to personal faith development moving people toward maturity and a deeper life with God (Rom 5:3–5; Jas 1:2–4). More than that, though, tests reveal the power of God to the world. This is what the early Christians understood as they admonished one another to “rejoice that you participate in the sufferings of Christ, so that you may be overjoyed when his glory is revealed” (1 Pet 4:13). God often unveils his power in the most trying times of life. His greatest revelation to the world came in the agony of crucifixion.


Jim Edlin, Daniel: A Commentary in the Wesleyan Tradition (, New Beacon Bible CommentaryKansas City, MO: Beacon Hill Press of Kansas City, 2009), 102-04.

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JoshInRI | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Jul 27 2013 8:08 PM

Wow..this rates as the single best reply ever in this forum...thanks.

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Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Aug 2 2013 5:25 AM

Peace, Kenneth!           ( ....  and all!!!)     Thanks so much for that great quote!  Well-written indeed, eh???             It looks like a great resource!                    *smile*

                                   Much appreciated!

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

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Graham Criddle | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Aug 2 2013 5:35 AM

I'm preparing for some sermons on Daniel and have been spending some time this morning looking at chapter 2.

The two commentaries which I found most useful - in terms of their insight and clarity were:

  • Stephen Miller's in the New American Commentary series (referenced above)
  • Rodney Stortz in the Preaching the Word Series

Graham

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JoshInRI | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Aug 2 2013 7:37 AM

God bless your prep with Logos and delivery of Daniel.

I will certainly consult those two resources as well.

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Colin Mitchell | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Aug 3 2013 10:53 AM

Hi Graham,  Sinclair Ferguson in the Preacher's commentary series is highly valued by many.  ESV Study Bible grids are very helpful visual aids too.

Unction to you!

Colin

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Graham Criddle | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Aug 3 2013 3:04 PM

Colin Mitchell:

Hi Graham,  Sinclair Ferguson in the Preacher's commentary series is highly valued by many.  ESV Study Bible grids are very helpful visual aids too.

Unction to you!

Colin

Thanks Colin

Appreciated, Graham

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