Göttingen Septuagint (65 Vols.)

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Posts 403
777 | Forum Activity | Posted: Thu, Dec 31 2009 5:17 AM

I have an interest in the Göttingen Septuagint that is "gathering interest' in the pre-pub section of the Logos products web site.

Here's a link: http://www.logos.com/products/prepub/details/4951

If you're someone that studies in the original languages and has an interest in the Old Testament then this is something that might be of real interest to you.  I'm here just pointing it out and reminding folks that Logos has some pretty good resources for people that have interests like this - as I do.

I'd like to see it out of the "gathering interest" stage and into production so I can get my copy.  So all of you please go dash off now and sign up for this pre-pub.

Thanks a bunch!!  Smile

Posts 3163
Dominick Sela | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 31 2009 11:04 AM

Thanks for that suggestion, I had not seen it and what a great Pre-Pub price! 

As another recommendation, I am hoping Live of the Saints" by Butler gets approved.  This is a Christian Classic, so many detailed stories of wonderful Christians that you can never find anywhere else! Twelve volumes worth too - http://www.logos.com/products/prepub/details/5203

Another great Pre-Pub is the Collected works of John Henry Newman, the great Anglican and Catholic (depending on the time of his life <g>).  This 31 volume work is $1500 on Pre pub for $160!  Newman is considered one of the top theologians of the 20th century, one day to be considered in the discussions of those like Anselm, Athanasius, Augustine, Bonaventure, Jerome, John Chrysostom, and more. http://www.logos.com/products/prepub/details/5182

I love reading about great Christians that preceded us, their lives and works are very inspiring. I am hopeful that others will see it the same way and chip in for these great deals!

Posts 142
James Macleod | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, May 10 2010 9:26 AM

Just getting this back on the radar to remind everyone about what a great price this is. It has been sitting at the same place for a bit now. If anyone else is interested please sign up and lets get it going.

Posts 22
Tam Nguyen | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, May 12 2010 10:19 PM

Ordered!

Posts 3163
Dominick Sela | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, May 13 2010 3:35 AM

A blog post on this outstanding resource was posted - it's going to be published anyway!

 Now, we’re thrilled to announce that the Göttingen Septuagint is ready to go into development. Even though we don’t have quite enough orders to cover costs, this resource is simply too important for Septuagint scholarship to wait any longer.

http://blog.logos.com/archives/2010/05/why_the_gottingen_septuagint_is_the_most_important_edition_ever_published.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+LogosBibleSoftwareBlog+%28Logos+Bible+Software+Blog%29

Posts 405
Amy Leung | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, May 13 2010 8:40 AM

It is a pity that the Journal of Biblical Literature is not seen as important enough for the promotion of biblical scholarship to be not waiting any longer. Wink   Not that I say that it is as important as the Göttingen Septuagint.  But then maybe if Rosie writes a compelling review on the resource here, that would bring it to life sooner.  (Rosie, are you there?  Wink)

Posts 912
David Knoll | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Aug 11 2010 2:48 PM

Estimated Ship Date: 11/8/2010

Posts 653
Alex Scott | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Aug 11 2010 4:11 PM

That's the 11th of August in Australia I think - 8th of November for the rest of us!

Longtime Logos user (more than $30,000 in purchases) - now a second class user because I won't pay them more every month or year.

Posts 8967
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Matthew C Jones | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Aug 19 2010 1:52 PM

Göttingen Septuagint (65 Vols.) http://www.logos.com/products/prepub/details/4951 is shipping SOON. So, I am asking for advice.
 
Considering Logos has established a publishing relationship with Cambridge now http://blog.logos.com/archives/2010/08/cambridge_university_press_books_on_pre-pub.html
and we have these two Pre-Pubs I find worthwhile:
Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges (21 Vols.)  http://www.logos.com/products/prepub/details/6768
The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges (57 Vols.) http://www.logos.com/products/prepub/details/6736

I wonder if the Cambridge Septuagint could possibly make it into Logos. And if it does, would there be benefit to having both the Cambridge Septuagint and the Gottengen Septuagint. And if a bloke only bought one, which should it be?

Some may say only scholars need such an edition. Just humor me this time. (I'm not a pilot either but I like helicopters landing in my back yard.) Would you buy GS?, or CS?, or something else if you wanted to study with the best? 

Logos 7 Collectors Edition

Posts 912
David Knoll | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Aug 19 2010 2:21 PM

Matthew C Jones:
I wonder if the Cambridge Septuagint could possibly make it into Logos. And if it does, would there be benefit to having both the Cambridge Septuagint and the Gottengen Septuagint. And if a bloke only bought one, which should it be?

 

Both are incomplete. If you need the Historical Books go for Cambridge If you need any other book go for Göttingen which has a larger manuscript collection and is also eclectic which is excellent for anyone who is not an expert in the history and character of LXX manuscripts.

BTW Cambridge is out of copyright so there is no need for Logos to contact the publisher.

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Matthew C Jones | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Aug 19 2010 2:33 PM

David Knoll:
Göttingen which has a larger manuscript collection and is also eclectic which is excellent for anyone who is not an expert

Thank you for pointing this out. I am definitely a novice and in my online investigating I ran across this post that made it sound like the Cambridge edition was the milk-toast version.

Critical Editions of Septuagint/Old Greek Texts  http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/ioscs/editions.html

So having both is not ridiculous? Since the Gottingen edition IS coming out soon, it may be a worthwhile purchase. The Cambridge edition can be added later if it becomes available. (So far, we don't have any whisper yet of the Cambridge edition being published in Logos. I am just hoping.)

Now I wish I had locked in that cheap initial Pre-Pub price of $299. That will teach us not to drag our feet.

 

Logos 7 Collectors Edition

Posts 912
David Knoll | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Aug 19 2010 9:30 PM

Matthew C Jones:
in my online investigating I ran across this post

IOSCS is a great place to start. They seem to underestimate Cambridge. I can't do without it when I work on the Books of Kingdoms for instance. I own a print copy of Cambridge (They still print it!) and enjoy it very much. Fernandez Marcos on the Lucianic recension is another valuable edition of the Historical Books I own.

Matthew C Jones:
The Cambridge edition can be added later if it becomes available. (So far, we don't have any whisper yet of the Cambridge edition being published in Logos. I am just hoping.)

 

Cambridge for the Historical Books together with Fernandez Marcos for the Lucianic recension would make the Logos LXX collection complete. Marcos was created on a computer so it should not be that difficult for Logos to convert it. Cambridge on the other hand....

Matthew C Jones:
Now I wish I had locked in that cheap initial Pre-Pub price of $299. That will teach us not to drag our feet.

 

The day Logos offered Göttingen was the opening of a new era in LXX scholarship. I can still remember the excitement and the e-mail I sent Prof. Emanuel Tov notifying him of this development. The price was and still is a bargain. Since then Accordance have started their own project but it will take them years to finish and it is not morphologically tagged. If the variants in the Logos edition are also tagged and searchable so that a "concordance" can be created, it could mean a turning point in the scholarly bible software market: Every scholar would have to own a copy of Logos. This is in fact how I started to consider Logos as an option. I think people don't understand what an important leap forward this is: THERE IS NO PRINT CONCORDANCE OF A CRITICAL EDITION OF THE LXX.   

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Matthew C Jones | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Aug 20 2010 9:31 AM

David Knoll:
If the variants in the Logos edition are also tagged and searchable so that a "concordance" can be created, it could mean a turning point in the scholarly bible software market: Every scholar would have to own a copy of Logos. This is in fact how I started to consider Logos as an option. I think people don't understand what an important leap forward this is: THERE IS NO PRINT CONCORDANCE OF A CRITICAL EDITION OF THE LXX.   

WoW.    This could be an incredible development.

As Mark A. Smith said in another thread:   "We live in the best of times!"  http://community.logos.com/forums/t/21692.aspx

I guess I will have to start eating Dandelion salad and nail soup to add that to my Pre-Pub orders,

        +      =  

It seems to be worth the sacrifice!

 

Logos 7 Collectors Edition

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Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Aug 20 2010 2:35 PM
 

Dandelion Salad RecipeDandelion Salad

By: ERLENSEE_GERMANY  "This is a very good use of all those annoying dandelions growing in your yard. Just so long as you don't have a dog! Top with your favorite dressing. I prefer hot bacon dressing!"

Ingredients

  • 1/2 pound torn dandelion greens
  • 1/2 red onion, chopped
  • 2 tomatoes, chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried basil
  • salt and pepper to taste

Directions

  1. In a medium bowl, toss together dandelion greens, red onion, and tomatoes. Season with basil, salt, and pepper.

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

Posts 5712
DIsciple II | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Aug 21 2010 3:56 AM

Matthew C Jones:

I guess I will have to start eating Dandelion salad and nail soup to add that to my Pre-Pub orders,

        +      =  

It seems to be worth the sacrifice!

 

Nail Soup

also  http://hem.fyristorg.com/kulturkemi/net/soup.htm

 

Posts 29
Jonathan Vliet | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Oct 10 2010 4:52 PM

I'm sure this will be a ridiculous question to many in the forum, but I'm a young student of the Bible, teaching myself everything as I go, and I'm interested in adding a Septuagint to my Logos library but can someone explain to me the difference between these two Septuagint options?

 

1. http://www.logos.com/ebooks/details/LLXXI

 - or -

2. http://www.logos.com/products/prepub/details/4951

 

Thank you

Posts 5337
Kevin Becker | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Oct 10 2010 5:09 PM

Jonathan, it's not a ridiculous question.

Basically, the Lexham interlinear has the standard LXX text with an English Interlinear glosses.

However, the LXX, as with all hand copied texts, has variations and different textual traditions. The Gottingen Septuagint is dedicated to documenting all the textual evidence about the LXX. If you are interested in textual criticism of the LXX then the Gottingen text is essential, if not the Lexham resource would be satisfactory.

Posts 29
Jonathan Vliet | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 12 2010 3:36 AM

Thank you Kevin,

May I ask if the original Septuagint manuscripts are at all comparable to the NT Greek manuscripts (I.E, from my understanding, they can be categorized in 3 basic ways: 1)  the Textus Receptus, 2) The "Alexandrian" manuscripts, and 3) the Latin Vulgate)?  Excluding the Vulgate, I'm wondering if the the Manuscripts of the Septuagint are comparable to the Textus Receptus (A traditional stream, more highly populated) and the Alexandrian texts (a more recently discovered stream, believed to be older). 

I'm not sure if this is a hot-button topic, considered taboo to admit amongst the forum or not, but I will be perfectly honest - from my study thus far, I am convicted of purity of the Textus Receptus stream (which, as I understand, is perhaps not the mainstream view).  So, the reason I risk admitting that is to ask if the Septuagint is equivalent in those two categories (a traditional stream and a more recently discovered yet "older" stream), and if so, which category would I get by simply going with the Lexham.  (And is that same Lexham something I would get by simply upgrading from the Leader's edition to the Scholar's edition?) 

Thank you again Kevin (or anyone else who would like to comment).  It's much appreciated,

God bless

Posts 5337
Kevin Becker | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 12 2010 4:03 AM

I am not LXX scholar so I can only tell you that I haven't heard that the Septuagint has a similar textual background to the New Testament. I have never seen competing editions of the LXX like I have of the NT.

Posts 912
David Knoll | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Oct 12 2010 5:13 AM

Jonathan Vliet:

May I ask if the original Septuagint manuscripts are at all comparable to the NT Greek manuscripts (I.E, from my understanding, they can be categorized in 3 basic ways: 1)  the Textus Receptus, 2) The "Alexandrian" manuscripts, and 3) the Latin Vulgate)?  Excluding the Vulgate, I'm wondering if the the Manuscripts of the Septuagint are comparable to the Textus Receptus (A traditional stream, more highly populated) and the Alexandrian texts (a more recently discovered stream, believed to be older). 

There are certainly groups of manuscripts which display a similar text type. According to Jerome there were three different texts of the LXX around the world: One prominent in Egypt which was attributed to Hesychius, one prominent in Antioch which was attributed to Lucian, and the Hexaplaric text which is attributed to Origen. The hexaplaric revision is the most extensive and it contaminated most of the later manuscripts. The Antiochian was identified for several books. In the historical books it is most conspicious in the group of manuscripts (boc2e2+r). The textus receptus of the Septuagint does not reflect the Old Greek text if only for the large hexaplaric revision towards the masoretic text. It is the aim of the Göttingen project to reconstruct the OG. Whether that is a goal that can be achieved is a different question. The text used in Lexham septuagint or Logos septuagint is Rahlf's it is an eclectic edition that does not reflect the textus receptus (The Sixtine Edition) but a partial attempt to reconstruct the OG based mainly on the Uncials.

Natalio Fernandez Marcos' "The Septuagint in Context" now included in "The Brill Septuagint Collection" of Logos gives a very thorough discussion of this as does Jellicoe's magnificent book: "The Septuagint and Modern Study" (OUP, 1968)    

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