Exclusive Benefits For High Resource Customers

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Posts 66
Father Gregory | Forum Activity | Posted: Wed, Jul 9 2014 8:12 PM

Hello folks:

Should there be a "benefit" made available to Logos customers who have purchase a large amount of resources?  I wouldn't know what that number would be.  I have 9,000+ resources and think that there are a lot more customers with larger library's than mine.

To start the discussion the "benefit" package could include:

1.  A direct line (email or phone line) to senior management personnel to receive our input on marketing ideas and product development.

2.  The ability to purchase resources at a "special" price along the lines of academic pricing.

3.  A "members only" forum.

4.  Participation in surveys that would gain valuable input into the decision making process.

5.  The opportunity to beta test the software enhancements.

Everyone's thoughts would be welcomed!

Posts 8967
RIP
Matthew C Jones | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 9 2014 8:32 PM

Captain Mayo:
Everyone's thoughts would be welcomed!

14,800+ rresources

  1. No
  2. Yes
  3. No
  4. No
  5. By Invitation

Maybe a semi-annual private sale.

Logos 7 Collectors Edition

Posts 103
mwk | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 9 2014 9:01 PM

Overall, I'd say no.

It's a nice thought that if you buy X amount, you get more benefits. There's even a certain logic to it.

But there's usually a bigger risk by the people who bought X minus some small amount who feel that the amount they have spent entitles them to all the bonuses. Those people start to complain and don't take kindly to being told to "just buy more so you can be in the 'special' club". In the end, it's not often worth it to alienate a group of customers for the benefit of another group if that other group isn't too large.

#1 - Wouldn't fly. Just because someone buys a lot doesn't make them wise on marketing or development. There are already channels for every customer to contribute their thoughts on any aspect of Logos.

#2 - Between CP and Pre-Pub pricing, I think Logos already does a good job of cutting deals for people, not to mention different sales and promotions throughout the year. Obviously, who wouldn't want even more? But it seems a bit unrealistic to think it would happen considering what they already do.

#3 - What do you envision people there talking about that can't already be talked about here?

#4 - There's already a mechanism to survey people who fall under certain criteria and that would include people who have bought a certain amount.

#5 - Just because someone has bought a lot, doesn't necessarily mean they're the best people to beta test. Beta testing is best done by people who actually use the software a lot and someone with the cheapest package could be using it far more than the person who has spent the most. I used to be a beta tester for a company... you want to wide range of user-categories participating.

Posts 390
Alain Maashe | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 9 2014 9:40 PM

 I think that amount spent would be more reliable than number of resources because the latter is almost meaningless.

 

The only benefits that would interest me would be special sales with substantial discounts (to reward loyalty) and  greater flexibility in customizing collections/ bundle for purchase (e.g. spend a minimum of $300, $500, $750 or $1000 per publisher and get to pick and choose the resources you want at a discount percentage that increases with the amount spent).

This flexibility would address an issue that is more and more acute for me as my library grows. I feel left out when it comes to most of the new deals, bundles and collections offered. In some cases I already have many of the resources offered and making a purchase would add mostly unwanted and unneeded fillers. Gone are the days when resource count was important to me. A great percentage of my resources are collecting digital dust and ibn some cases, I have even forgotten that I bought them (I still wonder what I was thinking when I clicked “buy”). I am now very selective, avoiding resources reduplicating what I already have or works that I am only likely to use once every decade. I have no use for a collection or bundle with 50 books if I only need 10 of them. What I need is the flexibility to choose what I want and only that. If Logos makes this possible for those who have reached a certain threshold, then they will continue to purchase with the same regularity that made them “major” customers without feeling forced to have to buy fillers or wait 6 months or more to get access to individual books in collections and at full price. Logos and individual publishers would still win because of volume purchase and I would be pleased because I would get greater value.

Posts 2465
Lee | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 9 2014 9:42 PM

Yes In full agreement with ST, mwk67 and Alain.

Posts 18644
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 9 2014 10:06 PM

People who have already bought a lot are not necessarily going to buy a lot more. They might have reached a point of "saturation" in their library and actually be slowing down in their purchases.

High-volume purchasers might not be the best ones to give more direct input to Logos about future directions. They might just have a lot of disposable income and be indiscriminate in what they buy. Also there are relatively few of them the higher you go up on the amount spent (or number of resources) scale, and thus that group's preferences might be quite rarefied and wouldn't necessarily gain Logos a large purchasing public for any resources they request.

Everyone already has a direct line (email) to senior management. CEO Bob Pritchett's email address has been published all over the forums, and he does read and respond to serious inquiries and complaints from users.

Posts 525
Kent | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jul 9 2014 11:00 PM

The creation of an "exclusive" club based on the volume of resources owned would not benefit anyone.

Posts 249
DHG | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 10 2014 2:27 AM

Would not benefit anyone?  That's interesting.  It seems it'd benefit those who purchased a large number of resources...did I miss something?!

Posts 449
Dave Moser | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 10 2014 5:42 AM

Captain Mayo:
2.  The ability to purchase resources at a "special" price along the lines of academic pricing.

This has been implemented to a degree in that owners of Portfolio can purchase bundles half off. I would like to see that expanded however as I have no desire to purchase Portfolio but have still invested thousands of dollars in Logos - someone who has paid Logos as much as the Portfolio library costs should have access to the same deal IMO, especially because my purchases outside of Portfolio weren't at as great a discount as the resources within the Portfolio library and were therefore a greater profit for Logos.

Rosie Perera:
People who have already bought a lot are not necessarily going to buy a lot more. They might have reached a point of "saturation" in their library and actually be slowing down in their purchases.

Good point. I am beginning to find myself in this position.

Kent:
The creation of an "exclusive" club based on the volume of resources owned would not benefit anyone.

I completely agree. There's no upside to it - the Logos forums, like one's Logos library, are valuable because of its size (in people, rather than books). Segmenting it makes it less valuable.

Posts 1216
Matt Hamrick | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 10 2014 6:02 AM

Dave Moser:

This has been implemented to a degree in that owners of Portfolio can purchase bundles half off. . .

I am pretty sure this deal extends to all those who upgraded from Logos 4 to Logos 5. I happen to have Portfolio, but I am almost positive it would still apply even if I upgraded from 4 to Logos 5 Gold. It was a deal upgrading to Logos 5.

Posts 10039
Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 10 2014 6:44 AM

Just for clarification, in retail, there's two programs:

Customer Loyalty Programs: These have as their goal, more purchasing (as noted above).  And so they're usually structured around behaviors that if rewarded, would generate 'more purchasing'.  Typically, it's 'current purchasing'. Not purchasing from ten years ago.  And how many trinkets isn't the metric; instead $$.

'Cadillac' Rewards:  These build image and appeal to the ego/lifestyle of the participant.  They're usually structured around a premium product that has already filtered out the 'hoi poloi'. The key here is 'lifetime', meaning the goal is to capture the customer, since they tend to buy high-margin, etc.

The latter is typically a gimme; if you don't do it, you'll loose the richie-rich.  Customer loyalty programs, on the other hand, are touch and go.  If not carefully structured, they can alienate the non-core customer (which is generally the source of last-dollar profit). And if indeed the goal is purchasing, they tend to be expensive .... 30% off, etc.  If you don't have high-margin merchandise, it defeats the purpose: profit.

I wasted this whole description primarily to illustrate Logos' problem is the little symbol in the middle of its logo.


Posts 8858
Forum MVP
Bruce Dunning | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 10 2014 7:08 AM

Captain Mayo:
Should there be a "benefit" made available to Logos customers who have purchase a large amount of resources?

This is an interesting discussion but generally I think the way Logos positions itself is fine. On the other hand who wouldn't like an additional benefit based on money spent? I'd take advantage of that if it were available.

Using adventure and community to challenge young people to continually say "yes" to God

Posts 885
Brother Mark | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 10 2014 7:33 AM

If I were making marketing decisions, this might bring a wry grin to my face.... Cynically, I might be tempted to think along these lines, "My best customers have proven that they will buy from me, so why would I incentivize them?  With a proven record of buying repeatedly and/or buying lots, I'm pretty confident that they'll continue to buy.  Now... if only I could incentivize everyone else...."

"I read dead people..."

Posts 2822
Michael Childs | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jul 10 2014 7:55 AM

Rosie Perera:

People who have already bought a lot are not necessarily going to buy a lot more. They might have reached a point of "saturation" in their library and actually be slowing down in their purchases.

High-volume purchasers might not be the best ones to give more direct input to Logos about future directions. They might just have a lot of disposable income and be indiscriminate in what they buy. Also there are relatively few of them the higher you go up on the amount spent (or number of resources) scale, and thus that group's preferences might be quite rarefied and wouldn't necessarily gain Logos a large purchasing public for any resources they request.

Everyone already has a direct line (email) to senior management. CEO Bob Pritchett's email address has been published all over the forums, and he does read and respond to serious inquiries and complaints from users.

I agree with what Rosie said.  I know I have slowed down drastically in my purchases. 

Besides, the number of resources doesn't have much to do with the value of a customer.  It would be more the value of the resources bought.   One $2,000 set of commentaries is a more valuable customer than 300 $3 purchases.  How many resources a person has is meaningless.

I know that over the last 20 years or so, I have spent a lot of money (for my income) on Logos resources.  I do not think that entitles me to any special treatment or deal.  I got a good deal and courteous treatment on every purchase from the get go.

Of course, I agree with what Bruce said, too.  We would all take advantage of anything offered that would save us money on a Logos purchase.

"In all cases, the Church is to be judged by the Scripture, not the Scripture by the Church," John Wesley

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