Collection suggestion: Cambridge Studies in Christian Doctrine

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Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Posted: Fri, Jan 8 2010 3:16 PM
  • The Bible, Theology, and Faith: A Study of Abraham and Jesus, R.W.L. Moberly
  • Theology, Music and Time, Jeremy S. Begbie
  • Church, World and the Christian Life: Practical-Prophetic Ecclesiology, Nicholas M. Healy
  • A Theology of Public Life, Charles T. Mathewes
  • Remythologizing Theology: Divine Action, Passion, and Authorship, Kevin J. Vanhoozer
  • Bound to Sin: Abuse, Holocaust and the Christian Doctrine of Sin, Alistair McFadyen
  • Christian Wisdom: Desiring God and Learning in Love, David F. Ford
  • Theology and the Dialogue of Religions, Michael Barnes
  • Prophecy and Discernment, R.W.L. Moberly
  • God, the Mind's Desire: Reference, Reason and Christian Thinking, Paul D. Janz
  • Theology, Political Theory, and Pluralism: Beyond Tolerance and Difference, Kristen Deede Johnson
  • Worship as Meaning: A Liturgical Theology for Late Modernity, Graham Hughes
  • Theology and the Drama of History, Ben Quash
  • Self and Salvation: Being Transformed, David F. Ford
  • A Political Theology of Nature, Peter Scott
  • Trinity and Truth, Bruce D. Marshall
  • The Creativity of God: World, Eucharist, Reason, Oliver Davies
  • Realist Christian Theology in a Postmodern Age, Sue Patterson
  • The Three Days of Easter, Brian Marshall
  • Theology and Education: The Virtue of Theology in a Secular World, Gavin D'Costa
  • The Church, Narrativity and Transcendence, Robert W. Jenson
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Ted Hans | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jan 8 2010 3:51 PM

Not heard of this one(series) Rosie. Is this one of those scholarly stuff that one needs a PHD to readBig Smile?

 

Ted

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Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jan 8 2010 4:52 PM

Ted Hans:

Not heard of this one(series) Rosie. Is this one of those scholarly stuff that one needs a PHD to readBig Smile?

 

I only own the first two of them on my list, one of which is by someone I know (Jeremy Begbie). I admit I have not read them yet. I suppose the series is rather on the scholarly side for Logos's main target audience. But I don't think it's any more so than, say, the Paternoster Theological Studies Collection. Maybe I'm getting carried away with all my suggestions... I'm going to cool it for a while. They've got enough ideas to mull over for quite some time now.

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Ted Hans | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jan 8 2010 5:12 PM

Rosie Perera:
But I don't think it's any more so than, say, the Paternoster Theological Studies Collection.

Okay, i am in for this since it is along the same lines as the Paternoster Theological Studies Collection. We in the UK when we hear Oxford or Cambridge, i mean - it says it all. Nothing else needs to be said or added.

There are three monograph from Paternoster i would love to see in Logos. Not sure why it was left out of the above offerings. Thanks for the response.

 

Ted.

 

  1. The Extent of the Atonement: A Dilemma for Reformed Theology from Calvin to the Consensus (1536-1675) (Studies in Christian History and Thought) by G. M. Thomas
  2. Calvin and English Calvinism to 1649 (Paternoster Biblical and Theological Monographs) by R.T. Kendall
  3. The Weakness of the Law: God's Law and the Christian in New Testament Perspective (Paternoster Biblical Monographs) by James M. M. Francis and Jonathan F. Bayes

 

 

 

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Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Jan 8 2010 8:26 PM

Ted Hans:

We in the UK when we hear Oxford or Cambridge, i mean - it says it all. Nothing else needs to be said or added.

We in the US hold Oxbridge in awe, though I have several friends who have gotten in to one or the other for grad school (including my uncle who did his DPhil at Oxford), so it doesn't seem like it's beyond the reach of mere mortals to understand the writings of Oxford and Cambridge publications. After all, C.S. Lewis was an Oxford don <b>and</b> a Cambridge don, and his books are quite accessible.  Lewis's fellow Inking, Charles Williams, had a lifelong career at Oxford University Press. And a friend of mine -- fellow alum from my seminary -- works for OUP. So I don't have the same feeling towards those presses as you do. When I see Oxford or Cambridge on the spine of a book, it says quality to me more than "out of my reach."  I've got many wonderful print-based books published by one or the other, some of which are quite down-to-earth or are basic reference works anybody would use. Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress is among them -- a classic in many Christians' libraries. Granted, these works of theology are more esoteric than Bunyan or Lewis, but I don't believe we should ever feel that anything is beyond the realm of possibility to understand, especially with the support of all the linked Logos resources.

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