I want to learn the bible on Logos, but I need your help. I have scholars logos. Please help.

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Posts 10
Adley Eastridge | Forum Activity | Posted: Wed, Mar 28 2012 5:35 PM

I bought Scholars Logos and seriously want to dig deeper in the word.

I've heard these words before here and there at church, but I have no idea of what to do with them right now. I feel really dumb not knowing where to start. I'm going to post a small list of what I want to learn about and use.

 

Greek Reverse Interlinear,   





Exhaustive Concordance





Biblical Ethics





Lectionary






Morphology




Syntax





English Lexicon

 

 

 

I know these are all on Logos software, but I don't know what to do with them.

 

Does anyone know of any links or videos are I can watch to learn what there are and how to use them?

 

I feel so lost not knowing and feel bad too. Please help.

 

 

 

Posts 1649
Room4more | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 28 2012 5:44 PM

Start here:

http://wiki.logos.com/   <-------click the link.

In the search box on the upper left you can type a word and go from there or just start reading how to use the L4 package...

DISCLAIMER: What you do on YOUR computer is your doing.

Posts 6685
Forum MVP
Lynden Williams | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 28 2012 6:41 PM

You may also find this link of tutorial videos handy. http://www.logos.com/videos

Lynden Williams Communications https://www.lyndenwilliams.net 

Posts 19067
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 28 2012 7:12 PM

priscilla eastridge:

I bought Scholars Logos and seriously want to dig deeper in the word.

Wonderful! Praying that your desire to dig deeper will be rewarded.

First some quick definitions for you:

priscilla eastridge:

Greek Reverse Interlinear,    

An "interlinear" is a book that has two interleaved sets of lines of text, in two different languages. One line will be followed by the equivalent (translated word for word) in another language. Standard Greek and Hebrew interlinear Bibles will have the Greek (NT) or Hebrew (OT) as the main line and the line underneath will be English "glosses" (one-word or very short phrase translations of the Greek word on the line above).

A "reverse interlinear" has the English Bible as the main line, and the line beneath shows the Greek or Hebrew words that the English was translated from. The word order will be different than it is in the original language Bibles, because it has to match the English word order. But it is helpful for people who don't know Greek and Hebrew, to find the Gk or Heb word they want to look up in a lexicon (a language dictionary) to find what other possible meanings it might have. 

priscilla eastridge:

Exhaustive Concordance

A concordance is a reference work that lists words (in alphabetical order) which appear in a book such as the Bible, and under each word shows you all the places in that book where the word appears. An "exhaustive" concordance is one which lists every single word, even the little ones, and every single occurrence, even the insubstantial ones.

There is really no need for concordances in Logos because the software itself has features that produce exactly what an old print-based concordance would have shown you.

priscilla eastridge:

Biblical Ethics

Ethics is a branch of philosophy that deals with what is right and wrong, or ethical. Biblical Ethics is specifically the study of ethics as derived from the ethical commands in the Bible: laws, household codes, and such.

priscilla eastridge:

Lectionary

A lectionary is a resource that sets out a calendar of readings from Scripture throughout the year, according to one of various plans (e.g., based on the cycle of the church calendar with certain times of year for remembering and reading the stories of Jesus birth, crucifixion, resurrection, and other parts of the Bible arranged throughout the year around those key dates). Many denominations have their own lectionaries; others share the Revised Common Lectionary. The concept of lectionary readings goes way way back in church history, even back to the Israelite times with Jewish readings in the Temple.

priscilla eastridge:

Morphology

Morphology (from the root "morph" which means "shape") is the "shape" that words in a language take, depending on how they are used grammatically in a sentence. For example, in English, I just used the word "gramatically" which is an Adverb, and those usually end in -ly. And if you strip off the ending you get "grammatical" which is an Adjective. Also there are different "persons" for the pronouns (first: I/me; second: you; third: he/she/they) and these affect how we "inflect" a verb. I go, you go, he goes, etc. The same sort of changes take place in Hebrew and Greek. Their morphologies are more complicated than that in English, but Logos has all kinds of powerful tools to help you learn and understand what the grammatical shapes of words might be implying. However these are pretty advanced features, and if you're just getting started and don't know any Biblical languages, I wouldn't worry about morphology for now.

priscilla eastridge:

Syntax

Syntax is the way words relate to each other, their word order and such. It is closely tied with Morphology. Again it's pretty advanced and when you're just getting started you don't need to know about it. But eventually you might wonder about things like "when is God the subject of a sentence?" in order to study the kinds of verbs (actions) that God does. Those kinds of questions can be answered using Syntax search.

priscilla eastridge:

English Lexicon

A lexicon is a language dictionary: generally translating from one language to another.  You won't generally see just an "English Lexicon"; not in Logos anyway. What it has are Greek-English Lexicons and Hebrew-English Lexicons. These are essentially dictionaries where you can look up a Greek or Hebrew word and see it's basic meaning in English. Some of the more advanced lexicons will also show you shades of meaning depending on where in the Bible that word is used, and they'll give you examples; the Logos editions of these resources will provide links to the Scripture verses used in the examples, so you can see the full context.

priscilla eastridge:

Does anyone know of any links or videos are I can watch to learn what there are and how to use them?

The Logos wiki is a website made up of user-created and edited documentation for Logos. It can be pretty overwhelming, but a good place to start is here: 

http://wiki.logos.com/Getting_Started_with_Logos

Lynden pointed you to the official Logos training videos, but you'll also find a bunch of great user-created videos linked in the wiki page: 

http://wiki.logos.com/Logos_4_Video_Tutorials

I give a particularly strong recommendation to the "Unofficial Logos 4 Tutorial Videos" by Mark Barnes, which are stored offsite: http://www.logos4training.com/videos/

priscilla eastridge:

I feel so lost not knowing and feel bad too. Please help.

Don't worry. Logos is a big program and there's a lot to learn. We all started not knowing what we were doing either. Hang in there on the learning curve, and ask questions on the Forums whenever you need a hand. There's a large and active and supportive user community all over the world, in all time zones, so chances are you'll get an answer in just a couple of hours.

Posts 34
dency hutchings | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 28 2012 8:19 PM

Welcome to the Forums Priscilla!

     Priceless Rosie priceless.  May God bless you good.

 

Posts 3110
Tes | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 28 2012 8:43 PM

Rosie Perera:

priscilla eastridge:

I bought Scholars Logos and seriously want to dig deeper in the word.

Wonderful! Praying that your desire to dig deeper will be rewarded.

First some quick definitions for you:

priscilla eastridge:

Greek Reverse Interlinear,    

An "interlinear" is a book that has two interleaved sets of lines of text, in two different languages. One line will be followed by the equivalent (translated word for word) in another language. Standard Greek and Hebrew interlinear Bibles will have the Greek (NT) or Hebrew (OT) as the main line and the line underneath will be English "glosses" (one-word or very short phrase translations of the Greek word on the line above).

A "reverse interlinear" has the English Bible as the main line, and the line beneath shows the Greek or Hebrew words that the English was translated from. The word order will be different than it is in the original language Bibles, because it has to match the English word order. But it is helpful for people who don't know Greek and Hebrew, to find the Gk or Heb word they want to look up in a lexicon (a language dictionary) to find what other possible meanings it might have. 

priscilla eastridge:

Exhaustive Concordance

A concordance is a reference work that lists words (in alphabetical order) which appear in a book such as the Bible, and under each word shows you all the places in that book where the word appears. An "exhaustive" concordance is one which lists every single word, even the little ones, and every single occurrence, even the insubstantial ones.

There is really no need for concordances in Logos because the software itself has features that produce exactly what an old print-based concordance would have shown you.

priscilla eastridge:

Biblical Ethics

Ethics is a branch of philosophy that deals with what is right and wrong, or ethical. Biblical Ethics is specifically the study of ethics as derived from the ethical commands in the Bible: laws, household codes, and such.

priscilla eastridge:

Lectionary

A lectionary is a resource that sets out a calendar of readings from Scripture throughout the year, according to one of various plans (e.g., based on the cycle of the church calendar with certain times of year for remembering and reading the stories of Jesus birth, crucifixion, resurrection, and other parts of the Bible arranged throughout the year around those key dates). Many denominations have their own lectionaries; others share the Revised Common Lectionary. The concept of lectionary readings goes way way back in church history, even back to the Israelite times with Jewish readings in the Temple.

priscilla eastridge:

Morphology

Morphology (from the root "morph" which means "shape") is the "shape" that words in a language take, depending on how they are used grammatically in a sentence. For example, in English, I just used the word "gramatically" which is an Adverb, and those usually end in -ly. And if you strip off the ending you get "grammatical" which is an Adjective. Also there are different "persons" for the pronouns (first: I/me; second: you; third: he/she/they) and these affect how we "inflect" a verb. I go, you go, he goes, etc. The same sort of changes take place in Hebrew and Greek. Their morphologies are more complicated than that in English, but Logos has all kinds of powerful tools to help you learn and understand what the grammatical shapes of words might be implying. However these are pretty advanced features, and if you're just getting started and don't know any Biblical languages, I wouldn't worry about morphology for now.

priscilla eastridge:

Syntax

Syntax is the way words relate to each other, their word order and such. It is closely tied with Morphology. Again it's pretty advanced and when you're just getting started you don't need to know about it. But eventually you might wonder about things like "when is God the subject of a sentence?" in order to study the kinds of verbs (actions) that God does. Those kinds of questions can be answered using Syntax search.

priscilla eastridge:

English Lexicon

A lexicon is a language dictionary: generally translating from one language to another.  You won't generally see just an "English Lexicon"; not in Logos anyway. What it has are Greek-English Lexicons and Hebrew-English Lexicons. These are essentially dictionaries where you can look up a Greek or Hebrew word and see it's basic meaning in English. Some of the more advanced lexicons will also show you shades of meaning depending on where in the Bible that word is used, and they'll give you examples; the Logos editions of these resources will provide links to the Scripture verses used in the examples, so you can see the full context.

priscilla eastridge:

Does anyone know of any links or videos are I can watch to learn what there are and how to use them?

The Logos wiki is a website made up of user-created and edited documentation for Logos. It can be pretty overwhelming, but a good place to start is here: 

http://wiki.logos.com/Getting_Started_with_Logos

Lynden pointed you to the official Logos training videos, but you'll also find a bunch of great user-created videos linked in the wiki page: 

http://wiki.logos.com/Logos_4_Video_Tutorials

I give a particularly strong recommendation to the "Unofficial Logos 4 Tutorial Videos" by Mark Barnes, which are stored offsite: http://www.logos4training.com/videos/

priscilla eastridge:

I feel so lost not knowing and feel bad too. Please help.

Don't worry. Logos is a big program and there's a lot to learn. We all started not knowing what we were doing either. Hang in there on the learning curve, and ask questions on the Forums whenever you need a hand. There's a large and active and supportive user community all over the world, in all time zones, so chances are you'll get an answer in just a couple of hours.

Normal 0 21 false false false DE X-NONE X-NONE

Dearest Rosie, I really appreciate for taking time to help someone who needs help. So, do I appreciate others as well, who have always made available themselves to help us.

Blessings in Christ.

Posts 3110
Tes | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 28 2012 8:45 PM

Rosie Perera:

priscilla eastridge:

I bought Scholars Logos and seriously want to dig deeper in the word.

Wonderful! Praying that your desire to dig deeper will be rewarded.

First some quick definitions for you:

priscilla eastridge:

Greek Reverse Interlinear,    

An "interlinear" is a book that has two interleaved sets of lines of text, in two different languages. One line will be followed by the equivalent (translated word for word) in another language. Standard Greek and Hebrew interlinear Bibles will have the Greek (NT) or Hebrew (OT) as the main line and the line underneath will be English "glosses" (one-word or very short phrase translations of the Greek word on the line above).

A "reverse interlinear" has the English Bible as the main line, and the line beneath shows the Greek or Hebrew words that the English was translated from. The word order will be different than it is in the original language Bibles, because it has to match the English word order. But it is helpful for people who don't know Greek and Hebrew, to find the Gk or Heb word they want to look up in a lexicon (a language dictionary) to find what other possible meanings it might have. 

priscilla eastridge:

Exhaustive Concordance

A concordance is a reference work that lists words (in alphabetical order) which appear in a book such as the Bible, and under each word shows you all the places in that book where the word appears. An "exhaustive" concordance is one which lists every single word, even the little ones, and every single occurrence, even the insubstantial ones.

There is really no need for concordances in Logos because the software itself has features that produce exactly what an old print-based concordance would have shown you.

priscilla eastridge:

Biblical Ethics

Ethics is a branch of philosophy that deals with what is right and wrong, or ethical. Biblical Ethics is specifically the study of ethics as derived from the ethical commands in the Bible: laws, household codes, and such.

priscilla eastridge:

Lectionary

A lectionary is a resource that sets out a calendar of readings from Scripture throughout the year, according to one of various plans (e.g., based on the cycle of the church calendar with certain times of year for remembering and reading the stories of Jesus birth, crucifixion, resurrection, and other parts of the Bible arranged throughout the year around those key dates). Many denominations have their own lectionaries; others share the Revised Common Lectionary. The concept of lectionary readings goes way way back in church history, even back to the Israelite times with Jewish readings in the Temple.

priscilla eastridge:

Morphology

Morphology (from the root "morph" which means "shape") is the "shape" that words in a language take, depending on how they are used grammatically in a sentence. For example, in English, I just used the word "gramatically" which is an Adverb, and those usually end in -ly. And if you strip off the ending you get "grammatical" which is an Adjective. Also there are different "persons" for the pronouns (first: I/me; second: you; third: he/she/they) and these affect how we "inflect" a verb. I go, you go, he goes, etc. The same sort of changes take place in Hebrew and Greek. Their morphologies are more complicated than that in English, but Logos has all kinds of powerful tools to help you learn and understand what the grammatical shapes of words might be implying. However these are pretty advanced features, and if you're just getting started and don't know any Biblical languages, I wouldn't worry about morphology for now.

priscilla eastridge:

Syntax

Syntax is the way words relate to each other, their word order and such. It is closely tied with Morphology. Again it's pretty advanced and when you're just getting started you don't need to know about it. But eventually you might wonder about things like "when is God the subject of a sentence?" in order to study the kinds of verbs (actions) that God does. Those kinds of questions can be answered using Syntax search.

priscilla eastridge:

English Lexicon

A lexicon is a language dictionary: generally translating from one language to another.  You won't generally see just an "English Lexicon"; not in Logos anyway. What it has are Greek-English Lexicons and Hebrew-English Lexicons. These are essentially dictionaries where you can look up a Greek or Hebrew word and see it's basic meaning in English. Some of the more advanced lexicons will also show you shades of meaning depending on where in the Bible that word is used, and they'll give you examples; the Logos editions of these resources will provide links to the Scripture verses used in the examples, so you can see the full context.

priscilla eastridge:

Does anyone know of any links or videos are I can watch to learn what there are and how to use them?

The Logos wiki is a website made up of user-created and edited documentation for Logos. It can be pretty overwhelming, but a good place to start is here: 

http://wiki.logos.com/Getting_Started_with_Logos

Lynden pointed you to the official Logos training videos, but you'll also find a bunch of great user-created videos linked in the wiki page: 

http://wiki.logos.com/Logos_4_Video_Tutorials

I give a particularly strong recommendation to the "Unofficial Logos 4 Tutorial Videos" by Mark Barnes, which are stored offsite: http://www.logos4training.com/videos/

priscilla eastridge:

I feel so lost not knowing and feel bad too. Please help.

Don't worry. Logos is a big program and there's a lot to learn. We all started not knowing what we were doing either. Hang in there on the learning curve, and ask questions on the Forums whenever you need a hand. There's a large and active and supportive user community all over the world, in all time zones, so chances are you'll get an answer in just a couple of hours.

Normal 0 21 false false false DE X-NONE X-NONE

Normal 0 21 false false false DE X-NONE X-NONE

Dearest Rosie, I really appreciate for taking time to help someone who needs help. So, do I appreciate others as well, who have always made available themselves to help us.

Blessings in Christ.

Posts 3110
Tes | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Mar 28 2012 8:45 PM

Rosie Perera:

priscilla eastridge:

I bought Scholars Logos and seriously want to dig deeper in the word.

Wonderful! Praying that your desire to dig deeper will be rewarded.

First some quick definitions for you:

priscilla eastridge:

Greek Reverse Interlinear,    

An "interlinear" is a book that has two interleaved sets of lines of text, in two different languages. One line will be followed by the equivalent (translated word for word) in another language. Standard Greek and Hebrew interlinear Bibles will have the Greek (NT) or Hebrew (OT) as the main line and the line underneath will be English "glosses" (one-word or very short phrase translations of the Greek word on the line above).

A "reverse interlinear" has the English Bible as the main line, and the line beneath shows the Greek or Hebrew words that the English was translated from. The word order will be different than it is in the original language Bibles, because it has to match the English word order. But it is helpful for people who don't know Greek and Hebrew, to find the Gk or Heb word they want to look up in a lexicon (a language dictionary) to find what other possible meanings it might have. 

priscilla eastridge:

Exhaustive Concordance

A concordance is a reference work that lists words (in alphabetical order) which appear in a book such as the Bible, and under each word shows you all the places in that book where the word appears. An "exhaustive" concordance is one which lists every single word, even the little ones, and every single occurrence, even the insubstantial ones.

There is really no need for concordances in Logos because the software itself has features that produce exactly what an old print-based concordance would have shown you.

priscilla eastridge:

Biblical Ethics

Ethics is a branch of philosophy that deals with what is right and wrong, or ethical. Biblical Ethics is specifically the study of ethics as derived from the ethical commands in the Bible: laws, household codes, and such.

priscilla eastridge:

Lectionary

A lectionary is a resource that sets out a calendar of readings from Scripture throughout the year, according to one of various plans (e.g., based on the cycle of the church calendar with certain times of year for remembering and reading the stories of Jesus birth, crucifixion, resurrection, and other parts of the Bible arranged throughout the year around those key dates). Many denominations have their own lectionaries; others share the Revised Common Lectionary. The concept of lectionary readings goes way way back in church history, even back to the Israelite times with Jewish readings in the Temple.

priscilla eastridge:

Morphology

Morphology (from the root "morph" which means "shape") is the "shape" that words in a language take, depending on how they are used grammatically in a sentence. For example, in English, I just used the word "gramatically" which is an Adverb, and those usually end in -ly. And if you strip off the ending you get "grammatical" which is an Adjective. Also there are different "persons" for the pronouns (first: I/me; second: you; third: he/she/they) and these affect how we "inflect" a verb. I go, you go, he goes, etc. The same sort of changes take place in Hebrew and Greek. Their morphologies are more complicated than that in English, but Logos has all kinds of powerful tools to help you learn and understand what the grammatical shapes of words might be implying. However these are pretty advanced features, and if you're just getting started and don't know any Biblical languages, I wouldn't worry about morphology for now.

priscilla eastridge:

Syntax

Syntax is the way words relate to each other, their word order and such. It is closely tied with Morphology. Again it's pretty advanced and when you're just getting started you don't need to know about it. But eventually you might wonder about things like "when is God the subject of a sentence?" in order to study the kinds of verbs (actions) that God does. Those kinds of questions can be answered using Syntax search.

priscilla eastridge:

English Lexicon

A lexicon is a language dictionary: generally translating from one language to another.  You won't generally see just an "English Lexicon"; not in Logos anyway. What it has are Greek-English Lexicons and Hebrew-English Lexicons. These are essentially dictionaries where you can look up a Greek or Hebrew word and see it's basic meaning in English. Some of the more advanced lexicons will also show you shades of meaning depending on where in the Bible that word is used, and they'll give you examples; the Logos editions of these resources will provide links to the Scripture verses used in the examples, so you can see the full context.

priscilla eastridge:

Does anyone know of any links or videos are I can watch to learn what there are and how to use them?

The Logos wiki is a website made up of user-created and edited documentation for Logos. It can be pretty overwhelming, but a good place to start is here: 

http://wiki.logos.com/Getting_Started_with_Logos

Lynden pointed you to the official Logos training videos, but you'll also find a bunch of great user-created videos linked in the wiki page: 

http://wiki.logos.com/Logos_4_Video_Tutorials

I give a particularly strong recommendation to the "Unofficial Logos 4 Tutorial Videos" by Mark Barnes, which are stored offsite: http://www.logos4training.com/videos/

priscilla eastridge:

I feel so lost not knowing and feel bad too. Please help.

Don't worry. Logos is a big program and there's a lot to learn. We all started not knowing what we were doing either. Hang in there on the learning curve, and ask questions on the Forums whenever you need a hand. There's a large and active and supportive user community all over the world, in all time zones, so chances are you'll get an answer in just a couple of hours.

Normal 0 21 false false false DE X-NONE X-NONE

Dearest Rosie, I really appreciate for taking time to help someone who needs help. So, do I appreciate others as well, who have always made available themselves to help us.

Blessings in Christ.

Posts 401
Sam West | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 29 2012 1:38 AM

Rosie Perera:
Syntax is the way words relate to each other, their word order and such. It is closely tied with Morphology. Again it's pretty advanced and when you're just getting started you don't need to know about it. But eventually you might wonder about things like "when is God the subject of a sentence?" in order to study the kinds of verbs (actions) that God does. Those kinds of questions can be answered using Syntax search.

Rosie is it possible to fined the subject in any sentence using the Syntax search?

Posts 23630
Forum MVP
Graham Criddle | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 29 2012 2:02 AM

Hi Sam

Sam West:
Rosie is it possible to fined the subject in any sentence using the Syntax search?

Not Rosie, but...

It should be possible.

For example, if you open the Syntax Search tool and choose Cascadia Syntax Graphs of the New Testament (you get similar results with OpenText) you can select from predefined templates - choose the one for Subject. (You can also do this in Andersen-Forbes for the Old Testament but the structures are more complex).

 

This builds the search for you which you can run (or edit if you want to change some of the details)

Was this the sort of thing you were looking for?

Graham

Posts 15805
Forum MVP
Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 29 2012 2:15 AM

Sam West:
is it possible to fined the subject in any sentence using the Syntax search?

In theory, yes.  Wiki Getting Started with Logos => Search has Tips and links, including => Setting up a Syntax Search and => A Strategy for Syntax Search

Keep Smiling Smile

Posts 512
Carmen Gauvin-O'Donnell | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 29 2012 4:33 AM

Some great replies from all the other folks so far, wouldn't you say?

And that's my thought: stay close to the forums... it's incredible what sort of awesome tips, tricks and techniques you'll learn from all the experienced folk in here and how quickly they can answer any questions you have.

Here's what I do once a day as part of my devotion time: I come to the Logos forums' main page (make sure you're logged in to the forums or it won't work) and set it to find all the "NEW SINCE LAST VISIT" posts. And then I just read through what interests me.

Enjoy! Also, don't forget to look at all your home pages in Logos every day... there's usually 4 or 5 of them depending on what you've chosen to show... you'll see all sorts of special offers and information that will show up there, along with blog postings by Morris Proctor, Logos' official trainer. Why just the other day he showed us how to create a visual filter that could show us at a glance whether the expression 'you" in the text was plural or singular (so you could tell, for instance, if God was speaking to the writer or to the whole group of people). VERY cool! Big Smile

Welcome to Logos! It's an AWESOME tool!

 

 

Posts 378
James Chandler | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 29 2012 4:43 AM

Thank you.  For those definitions, I often wondered but was to lazy to ask. Smile

Running on ASUS Windows 10 I7 24 gig of ram, 1 Terabyte drive.

Philippians 2:3 Do nothing from selfish ambition or conceit, but in humility count others more significant than yourselves.

Posts 15805
Forum MVP
Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :) | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 29 2012 4:52 AM

Carmen Gauvin-O'Donnell:
Why just the other day he showed us how to create a visual filter that could show us at a glance whether the expression 'you" in the text was plural or singular (so you could tell, for instance, if God was speaking to the writer or to the whole group of people). VERY cool! Big Smile

Forum thread has four Logos Greek Morphology verbal visual filters, including singular vs plural with a screen capture showing visual filter usage in Greek and English.

Wiki Getting Started with Logos => Learning Logos includes: Reading List: Logos blog and forum tips was preceded by forum thread with some screen shots: New way to learn Logos (Reading List links to many Blog articles and Forum discussions, grouped by topic, can check items to track your progress)

Keep Smiling Smile

Posts 2854
Mike Childs | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 29 2012 6:54 AM

priscilla eastridge:

I bought Scholars Logos and seriously want to dig deeper in the word.

I've heard these words before here and there at church, but I have no idea of what to do with them right now.

There is lots of good advice in this tread - especially regarding the free instructional video that you can watch.  So I will just add my prayers and best wishes.  I pray you enjoy and benefit greatly from your Logos software.  It is a wonderful product.  The more you use it, the more natural it becomes. 

I hope you will be active in these forums.  It is a great place to find help and interact with fellow Logos users.

God bless you, and welcome to the Logos community.

"In all cases, the Church is to be judged by the Scripture, not the Scripture by the Church," John Wesley

Posts 898
Brother Mark | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 29 2012 7:08 AM

dency hutchings:

Welcome to the Forums Priscilla!

     Priceless Rosie priceless.  May God bless you good.

 

Yes

 

Although Rosie encapsulated what my response would have been, literally word for word! ... You can always rely on the wisdom of the ever articulate Rosie every time.

 

"I read dead people..."

Posts 401
Sam West | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 29 2012 8:54 AM

Graham Criddle:

Hi Sam

Sam West:
Rosie is it possible to fined the subject in any sentence using the Syntax search?

Not Rosie, but...

It should be possible.

For example, if you open the Syntax Search tool and choose Cascadia Syntax Graphs of the New Testament (you get similar results with OpenText) you can select from predefined templates - choose the one for Subject. (You can also do this in Andersen-Forbes for the Old Testament but the structures are more complex).

 

This builds the search for you which you can run (or edit if you want to change some of the details)

Was this the sort of thing you were looking for?

Graham

 

THANKS GRAHAM

 

Posts 401
Sam West | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 29 2012 8:57 AM

Keep Smiling 4 Jesus :):

Sam West:
is it possible to fined the subject in any sentence using the Syntax search?

In theory, yes.  Wiki Getting Started with Logos => Search has Tips and links, including => Setting up a Syntax Search and => A Strategy for Syntax Search

Keep Smiling Smile

THANKS KEEP SMILLING

 

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Sam West | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 1 2012 5:51 AM

Graham Criddle:
For example, if you open the Syntax Search tool and choose Cascadia Syntax Graphs of the New Testament (you get similar results with OpenText) you can select from predefined templates - choose the one for Subject. (You can also do this in Andersen-Forbes for the Old Testament but the structures are more complex).

Graham i have tried several times to setup a Syntax search with no avail. what i am wanting is for L4 to underline or highlight all the subjects in say Matthew in each scripture/sentence. i like to use the Morph feature and work with verbs that relate to the subject. most of the time i can find the subject. sometimes i have trouble. would it be possible for you to set up one based on my above information and post it? Keep smilling may have what i am looking for but its in Greek and i know nothing about Greek.

Thanks

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Graham Criddle | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Apr 1 2012 7:51 AM

Hi Sam

Sam West:
Keep smilling may have what i am looking for but its in Greek and i know nothing about Greek

The problem is that the Syntax search function works against the original languages - essentially it is inspecting syntactical graphs of the text in the original languages and returning results based on that inspection

There have been many requests to be able to have an English translation parallel to the syntax search results (which you can do) and for the highlighted word from the search against the original language to be sympathetically highlighted in the English translation (which you can't do).

The best I can think of does require some inspection of the Greek.

So taking my example syntax search above

and refining it to just work against Matthew, I get the results on the left-hand side of the diagram below (you will probably need to click on it to see it properly)

The words highlighted in red are the search results - the subjects.

The right-hand side is what I get when I click on one of the verse references - this is the actual graph which is being analysed in the syntax search.

You will see parts of the tree which are encoded with the letter "S", one of them is shown with a popup, which signify a subject.  If you follow this link to the right you will see the greek word and its English equivalent. So you can get to see what the English word is but you need to go through the Greek.

Hope this is useful - and makes sense!


Graham 

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