500 Megapack looks like a garage sale you leave early

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JoshInRI | Forum Activity | Posted: Thu, Dec 26 2013 6:36 AM

Ok, I realize for some people the 500 megapack on sale looks like a great deal and some may consider Logos very generous in its offering......

That being said, it looks to me like a garage sale with ancient dusty books that you look at, put back, and quietly leave the garage without buyer's remorse.

Am I missing something here?  The Whitfield books look good but really what use are the others ones, except one or two of the commentaries, which are always useful I think.

This isn't a bash Logos post....I am curious if any fellow Baptist Seminarians (just for example) see any value in this collection?

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Matt Hamrick | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 26 2013 6:45 AM

Yes, I saw some value with Whitefield, Zwingli, Arminius and the Puritans. To gather these titles alone would have cost more than my price for the 500 Mega Book Collection.

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DMB | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 26 2013 6:56 AM

Absent having already purchased many of the exegetical volumes at CP prices, the answer is 'yes'.  I think Logos was (and hopefully also in the future) will put CP sets on major sale for those who acted as 'grasshoppers' (me) instead of 'ants' (smart people).

Maybe it depends on the seminary?  (Since as you say, it's not Logos, and others find value.  Only one choice left.)

"God will save his fallen angels and their broken wings He'll mend."

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Sean | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 26 2013 6:59 AM

There's lot of good stuff in there. Some of them are on my wishlist; for reference, I teach systematic and historical theology at an ecumenical seminary. I'll justify just a few:

-Welhausen's work on the Pentateuch: I'm not in the field of OT but am interested in understanding his theory more. For the most part, later liberal works assume you already know about it, whereas conservative one just explain why they think it is wrong. I'd like to know what he actually came to think and how he got there, so I want to read his original work.

-The complete works of Arminius. The work of Menno Simons. These are important figures in protestantism who are perpetually misunderstood because no one goes back and reads them, just what other people they already agree with have written about them.

-Same goes for Ritschl.

-von Harnack's work on the History of dogma is a classic that is still constantly referred to. I have access to hardcopies but want the ease of having them in Logos.

-Many others could be mentioned here--Whitelfield, Finney, Zwingli, and so forth.

Yes, there is some "filler" here, but what exactly should be classified as that is very subjective. I'm not interested in all the Puritan stuff, but as you can see, others are.

It's a good deal. I plan on getting it if Logos restores the volumes it pulled that it already gave to early purchasers.

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NB.Mick | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 26 2013 7:13 AM

JoshInRI:

Am I missing something here?  (..) This isn't a bash Logos post....I am curious if any fellow Baptist Seminarians (just for example) see any value in this collection?

Hm. It does sound a lot like a bash Logos post. If a certain deal isn't your piece of cake, maybe it's wiser to just leave it alone?

For example, I'm no SDA. I personally wouldn't pay to receive the wisdom of a prophetess which apparently birthed something that - for many other christians - looks a denomination ridden with exclusivism, legalism and fake excuses for a return of Chridst which just didn't happen. But then it seems, there are quite a number of brothers and sisters who want to live their lifes as Christians with the same vigour and sprit (or better: Spirit) than I do - and who belong there. They celebrate a lot of deals that help them in building Logos libraries to better study God's word but also the history of their denomination. Praise to them - and to Logos, in making this possible (and in the end to the Lord, whose is all wisdom).

I received some 320 new books in the Megapack collection, which means, I paid for about 180 of them when they were in CP or PB. I'm sick of the flood of reformed liturature that is drowning every reasonable voice in theology, thus I rejoice most in the Works of Arminius - but then, I think, I can probably still learn a lot from calvinist sources like those contained in the Megapack. And I am far from a liberal, but I bought the Harnack stuff when it appeared (and thus it's not new to me in the Magapack), because I know of the vast influence the "History of Religion"-school played in theology.

So, for those who like to read the words of someone in context - rather than just the thoughts of someone who didn't even grasp the low-quality-secondary literature he purported to read, but had someone else copy for him - there's probably a lot of value in this pack. The thoughts of C.S. Lewis regarding old versus new books may come to mind, too.

For others (and I can't tell where Baptist seminarians fall in this - maybe depends on the seminary?) - wasn't there a sale on Driscoll books at Vyrso these days?

   

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NB.Mick | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 26 2013 7:17 AM

Sean:
There's lot of good stuff in there. (...)

Sean,

you put it a lot better than I did.

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Sean | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 26 2013 7:18 AM

Thanks, Mick!

NB.Mick:
For others (and I can't tell where Baptist seminarians fall in this - maybe depends on the seminary?) - wasn't there a sale on Driscoll books at Vyrso these days?

Naughty, naughty! Big Smile

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abondservant | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 26 2013 7:20 AM

I am interested in Whitefield, zwingli and the puritans as well.

PLUS I'm a bit of a commentary hound, old or not, I find it interesting to read through the thoughts of previous generations on scripture. Its one of the reasons I enjoy attending (often translated) bible studies and sermons in other countries.

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Bruce Dunning | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 26 2013 7:29 AM

Here is Dan Pritchard's blog on how the Megapack came to be - http://blog.logos.com/2013/12/why-i-did-it-the-truth-comes-out/?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=logostalk

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DMB | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 26 2013 7:39 AM

Thanks, Bruce. Clarifies a lot.  Key word 'cheesy'.  Not 'dusty books' or 'useless garage sale'.

'You’ll notice that Mega Pack doesn’t have the same look and feel of most of our marketing. It is hyped, sensational, and perhaps a bit cheesy. That’s my fault. I assure you I will back off the cheese and let our high standards of elegance return once this promotion is over.'

Perhaps Josh was used the high standards of elegance?

"God will save his fallen angels and their broken wings He'll mend."

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Bruce Dunning | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 26 2013 7:54 AM

Denise, I think you are twisting things here. "perhaps a bit cheesy" is Dan's expression that I think is referring to the sale and not to the choice or content of the books. Notice that the context is marketing.

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DMB | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 26 2013 8:03 AM

Maybe it's our backgrounds?  I used to be an exec in retail. Marketing and product are synonomous at the instant in time that copy goes out.

One could advertise a cheesy sale.  Or one could offer non-cheesy books.  The problem occurs when the product and the hype don't match.  I suspect much of the grousing this holiday period was due to being used to non-cheesy hyping (marketing) and non-cheesy prices/books (the product).  In this case, it appears we have cheesy hyping, and cheesy book selection (the OP's frustration).

Personally I thought the cheese was ok.

"God will save his fallen angels and their broken wings He'll mend."

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Bruce Dunning | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 26 2013 8:10 AM

Personally I wouldn't use the word cheesy at all.

Using adventure and community to challenge young people to continually say "yes" to God

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David Bailey | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 26 2013 8:12 AM

JoshInRI:

Ok, I realize for some people the 500 megapack on sale looks like a great deal and some may consider Logos very generous in its offering......

That being said, it looks to me like a garage sale with ancient dusty books that you look at, put back, and quietly leave the garage without buyer's remorse.

Am I missing something here?  The Whitfield books look good but really what use are the others ones, except one or two of the commentaries, which are always useful I think.

This isn't a bash Logos post....I am curious if any fellow Baptist Seminarians (just for example) see any value in this collection?

I guess it depends on what your interests are. I see tremendous value in many of the resources found in this Mega deal. Others on the forums have already expressed those values.  I would jump on this deal in a heart beat; unfortunately, I don't have the funds for it, even at this low price per volume.  Sad

David

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DMB | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 26 2013 8:13 AM

True.  The normal word is 'thin' (product offering).

"God will save his fallen angels and their broken wings He'll mend."

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Jack Caviness | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 26 2013 8:59 AM

JoshInRI:
it looks to me like a garage sale with ancient dusty books that you look at, put back, and quietly leave the garage without buyer's remorse.

Appears that we have an abundance of Acts 17:21 folks in Christendom today. An unnamed right-wing radio commentator has frequently said that for most people history began the day they were born. This is becoming increasingly true in Christian circles to the impoverishment of the Church. It is the very height of arrogance to suppose that no one could possibly interpret Scripture prior to the last quarter of the 20th century. After all, the bible itself is a very ancient book.

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Evan Boardman | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 26 2013 9:47 AM

It's a great deal but I didnt bite because I already had most of what looked good to me and the few stuff that I did want didnt add up to a savings. 

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DMB | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 26 2013 10:17 AM

I like Acts 17:22 - the literal greek.  Only the Bohairic coptic translation is brave enough.   Just too many demon-fearers on the forum with nothing to do.

But I think it's interesting how people hem and haw on why they didn't bite.  Selling hem and haw won't pay the bills.

"God will save his fallen angels and their broken wings He'll mend."

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Evan Boardman | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 26 2013 11:04 AM

Denise:
But I think it's interesting how people hem and haw on why they didn't bite.

No hem and hawing. just facts.

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DIsciple II | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Dec 26 2013 12:51 PM

Jack Caviness:

JoshInRI:
it looks to me like a garage sale with ancient dusty books that you look at, put back, and quietly leave the garage without buyer's remorse.

Appears that we have an abundance of Acts 17:21 folks in Christendom today. An unnamed right-wing radio commentator has frequently said that for most people history began the day they were born. This is becoming increasingly true in Christian circles to the impoverishment of the Church. It is the very height of arrogance to suppose that no one could possibly interpret Scripture prior to the last quarter of the 20th century. After all, the bible itself is a very ancient book.

I agree Jack, I cringe a little when people only want today's scholarship.  Are we somehow more superior today than we were yesterday? Do we have a special relationship with the Holy Spirit today that wasn't available yesterday.  For sure in the fields like archeology and linguistics we know things today we didn't yesterday that assist us in understanding the scriptures but if we suggest that only material written in our lifetimes is of value then who are we exalting? Sure there was some less valuable material written yesterday, but so is there today. If Christ has not returned in 100 years how much of what we regard as the best, today's material be discarded as not relevant, and yet some of yesterday's material will remain as valuable.

i can though understand a student having to make selective choices about what they personally purchase,but that is different to rejecting yesterday's material because you think it no longer relevant.

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