Commentaries that reflect the views of the Pentecostal belief

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Sam West | Forum Activity | Posted: Sat, May 28 2011 2:42 AM

Is there a commentary/commentaries that reflect the views of the Pentecostal belief in Logos. Or maybe some of you would recommend something outside of Logos.

Thanks 

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Mark Barnes | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, May 28 2011 4:12 AM

Gordon Fee on 1 Corinthians is an obvious choice. He's also written several other commentaries scattered over various series. There are other Pentecostal books in Logos, but many of them are doctrinal, rather than commentaries.

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NB.Mick | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, May 28 2011 4:46 AM

You may notice that Logos have tagged some of their resources according to the christian group they may respresent - just look on the product page:

Note that there are a number of pentecostal resources:

 

this includes three commentaries that may or may not be helpful for you

Gordon Fee's commentary would most probably not be regarded as "pentecostal" per se, but as a scholarly commentary from an evangelical perspective (haven't checked Logos' tagging on this, though). I don't know this work, but the German translation of "How to read the bible for all it's worth", which does not read as a specifically pentecostal book either.

Maybe the other way round would be more beneficial: assuming that there are pentecostal publishing houses, identifying commenatries there and checking whether these are available from Logos.

Mick

 

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Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, May 28 2011 6:25 AM

Sam West:

 

Is there a commentary/commentaries that reflect the views of the Pentecostal belief in Logos. Or maybe some of you would recommend something outside of Logos.

Thanks 

Jack Hayford's New Spirit Filled Life Bible should fit. It's  predecessor Spirit Filled Life Study Bible is a Bible Commentary & the new one should be from its similar description (Bible Notes are treated as Commentaries eg. MacArthur Study Bible).

Dave
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Jerry M | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, May 28 2011 6:48 AM

Pentecostal/Charismatic commentaries are more rare than hen's teeth.  Here's a link to a publisher.

Logion Press

"For the kingdom of God does not consist in words but in power"      Wiki Table of Contents

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Mark Barnes | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, May 28 2011 7:11 AM

NewbieMick:
Gordon Fee's commentary would most probably not be regarded as "pentecostal" per se

Fee doesn't accept tongues as initial evidence of Spirit baptism, but other than that he's a pretty straight-down-the-line Pentecostal, and in my view that comes across pretty clearly in his comments on chapters 12-14 of 1 Corinthians.

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Jesse Blevins | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, May 28 2011 7:21 AM

wordsearch bible software offers the complete biblical library which was edited by stanley horton. These might be worth you taking a look at. several of th N.T. commentaries were written by Horton himself such as Luke, Acts, and Revelation. 

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NB.Mick | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, May 28 2011 8:16 AM

Mark,

maybe I was less clear in my short comment than I should have been, thanks for following up. From what I've read about Fee's NICNT commentary on Corinthians, it is clear that he follows a non-cessationist reading of the text (which is necessary, but maybe not sufficient to label it as "reflecting the views of pentecostal belief") as well as an egalitarian reading with regards to the "women in the church" question (don't know where pentecostal belief stands on that one). However, most will perceive this as a volume within a conservative evangelical series, not as an explicitly "pentecostal" apologetic. Fee himself admits his heritage (snip from amazon's look into the book)

According to what I have read, many people praise Fee for top-scholarly conservative evangelical exegesis - even D.A. Carson in his Survey of NT Commentaries, who admits coming to different results on some topics, ranks Fee's book as the top general commentary on 1 Cor (position tied with Garland's BECNT, whom Carson doesn't discuss). So many people seem to recognize Fee's book as an evangelical commentary, however it is surely supportive to some pentacostal points of view.

Mick   

 

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Rich DeRuiter | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, May 28 2011 8:55 AM

NewbieMick:
So many people seem to recognize Fee's book as an evangelical commentary, however it is surely supportive to some pentacostal points of view.

Fee identifies himself as a Pentecostal, but this begs the question "What is a Pentecostal?" Is it a set of practices, a set of beliefs, an historical movement, all (some) of the above? As a Christian Reformed Pastor fully engaged in the use of all the spiritual gifts & practices mentioned in Scripture (but not part of the historical Pentecostal movement), I've heard some AG's & 4-Square say our congregation is more Pentecostal than their church. I think this is about practice, not theology. In terms of theology, one used to be able to say that Pentecostalism requires that tongues is the initial sign of the infilling of the Spirit. Speaking with those who self-identify as Pentecostals, this is no longer universally the case. In fact, in some (self-identified) Pentecostal churches the use of 'extra-ordinary gifts' is either discouraged, or they are simply falling away out of disuse.

This is to say nothing of the charismatic movement and so-called "Third Wave of the Holy Spirit," which shares many common points with Pentecostalism. Further, some Pentecostals have embraced some of the unique strands of these movements, making the uniqueness of contemporary Pentecostalism even harder to nail down.

In our day the term "Pentecostal" has come to mean so many things that it is almost impossible to answer the original question of this thread, without simply defining the term in a limited (and therefore imprecise) way -- as in those that self-identify as Pentecostals.

From a (non-cessationist) Reformed perspective, I'm convinced that any honest treatment of the Word will be useful for Pentecostals as well as non-Pentecostals, in that such will tend to affirm those points of our respective theological traditions and heritage that conform to Scripture and make us uncomfortable with those aspects that aren't quite fully in tune with the teaching of Scripture. Indeed, I've found this to be the case personally as I wrestle with the issues of Spirit-empowered ministry in a tradition that has not given much thought to the idea. And though Pentecostals (even more than Fundamentalists and some Evangelicals) have tended to disparage scholarship, this has changed and many are finding a great deal of help in the Biblically honest scholarly materials that are available from other perspectives. This also explains why there are so few scholarly works by Pentecostals such as the original poster requests (thankfully, this is changing).

 

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Michael Anda | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, May 28 2011 9:21 AM

I want to go to your church, Richard.  Where are you located?

 

 

 

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Rich DeRuiter | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, May 28 2011 9:33 AM

Michael Anda:

I want to go to your church, Richard.  Where are you located?

Alger, Washington (about 15 mi. South of Bellingham). Of course, you're welcome.

 Help links: WIKI;  Logos 6 FAQ. (Phil. 2:14, NIV)

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Michael Anda | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, May 28 2011 9:46 AM

If I ever get out your way to visit, I will be SURE to look you up.  I'm located in Fargo, ND.

 

 

 

 

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Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, May 28 2011 10:29 PM

Richard DeRuiter:
And though Pentecostals (even more than Fundamentalists and some Evangelicals) have tended to disparage scholarship

That is true as I nearly fell asleep in Church this morning - I've also noticed this trend with a number of Apologetics speakers we have hadWink

Richard DeRuiter:
I'm convinced that any honest treatment of the Word will be useful for Pentecostals as well as non-Pentecostals

That is also true and I prefer the expository commentaries, especially those that discuss opposing views (eg. The Expositor's Bible Commentary).

Dave
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Bohuslav Wojnar | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, May 29 2011 4:31 AM

Richard DeRuiter:
From a (non-cessationist) Reformed perspective, I'm convinced that any honest treatment of the Word will be useful for Pentecostals as well as non-Pentecostals

From the Pentecostal perspective... you are right. YesSmile

P.S.

All you have said Richard is correct IMHO, just to mention one thing: our movement is a Classical Pentecostal one, more than 100 years old, and we have never had the initial evidence of speaking in tongues as a dogma. the teaching has rather been brought to us by the contacts with the AoG teachers and pastors from the US. I know there are many other movements in the Classical Pentecostalism who are about the same in that matter.

Bohuslav

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Rich DeRuiter | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, May 29 2011 7:54 AM

Bohuslav Wojnar:
our movement is a Classical Pentecostal one, more than 100 years old, and we have never had the initial evidence of speaking in tongues as a dogma. the teaching has rather been brought to us by the contacts with the AoG teachers and pastors from the US. I know there are many other movements in the Classical Pentecostalism who are about the same in that matter.

Thanks for the clarification. I guess I should have said that just about U.S Pentecostalism. The AG still hold this officially (though I know AG pastors who don't) as does the 4Square. I'm not sure about some of the others. When I was in the Dominican Republic tongues wasn't a big deal for Pentecostals there either (healing was - and just as important to them: exuberant worship), though I never asked about their 'initial sign' theology.

 Help links: WIKI;  Logos 6 FAQ. (Phil. 2:14, NIV)

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Ron Corbett | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, May 31 2011 5:10 AM

Pastor Jesse Blevins :
the complete biblical library which was edited by stanley horton. These might be worth you taking a look at. several of th N.T. commentaries were written by Horton himself such as Luke, Acts, and Revelation. 

Stanley Horton wrote a commentary on 1 Peter that was excellent. I would love to see more from him in Logos. Also, Fee's I Corinthians is part of the NICNT series. He also has several other Commentaries - these would be great to have in Logos. And he wrote a book called "God's Empowering Presence" which is his work on the Holy Spirit in Paul's Writings. This would be IMHO a must for us. There are also some good treatments of the history of the gifts surveyed during different periods of church history. (I am away from my bookshelves now so I can't give titles/authors).

Richard: Your [frequently quoted] comment is appreciated here as well. Take this as another "Amen".

The words, "scholarship" and "pentecostal" did not go together too well in years past. Sad, but true. But, this is changing and we can hope to see the fruits of this change reflected in quality resources issued- and hopefully offered in Logos - in the days ahead.

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Graham Owen | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, May 31 2011 8:15 AM

Richard DeRuiter:
Fee identifies himself as a Pentecostal, but this begs the question "What is a Pentecostal?"

As a Pentecostal Pastor, I think that the question of who or what we are, in comparison to other believers, has been come increasingly difficult to answer. reading the experiences of the "first Pentecostals" in the UK and US as they expounded the view that the use of the Gifts had not ceased in a world where cessationism was largely accepted without debate and comparing them to our experiences today it is clear that a lot has changed. This change is evidenced in this statement:

Richard DeRuiter:
From a (non-cessationist) Reformed perspective, I'm convinced that any honest treatment of the Word will be useful for Pentecostals as well as non-Pentecostals

Holding a non cessationist view is definitely a big part of being Pentecostal so works by authors who are also non cessationist are helpful but this is not the only factor to take into account. Our denomination emerged from the Holiness Movement so that informs our teaching as well and is important to our understanding of Sanctification. I agree that as a label Pentecostal lacks precision, I know Churches that are denominationally Pentecostal but do not exhibit and features that I would associate as Pentecostal while Churches from other denominations are Pentecostal in practice but not in name.  Whilst I am happy to refer to myself as a Pentecostal, I tend to think of myself in a far more granular way. I think it was Wayne Grudem who put a chart in the front of his Systematic Theology that documented his personal position on a range of issues, identifying himself by these rather than by a denominational definition. To address the threads original question. My personal view is that I don't need Commentaries written by Pentecostals but I do need Commentaries that are free from interpretation based on a theological or denominational point of view instead of an accurate analysis of the text in context. I want the commentator, to the best of his or her ability, to tell me what the texts really says and not what he (or I) want it to say.

God Bless

Graham

Pastor - NTCOG Basingstoke

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Bohuslav Wojnar | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, May 31 2011 12:36 PM

Graham Owen:

Richard DeRuiter:
Fee identifies himself as a Pentecostal, but this begs the question "What is a Pentecostal?"

As a Pentecostal Pastor, I think that the question of who or what we are, in comparison to other believers, has been come increasingly difficult to answer. reading the experiences of the "first Pentecostals" in the UK and US as they expounded the view that the use of the Gifts had not ceased in a world where cessationism was largely accepted without debate and comparing them to our experiences today it is clear that a lot has changed. This change is evidenced in this statement:

 

Richard DeRuiter:
From a (non-cessationist) Reformed perspective, I'm convinced that any honest treatment of the Word will be useful for Pentecostals as well as non-Pentecostals

Holding a non cessationist view is definitely a big part of being Pentecostal so works by authors who are also non cessationist are helpful but this is not the only factor to take into account. Our denomination emerged from the Holiness Movement so that informs our teaching as well and is important to our understanding of Sanctification. I agree that as a label Pentecostal lacks precision, I know Churches that are denominationally Pentecostal but do not exhibit and features that I would associate as Pentecostal while Churches from other denominations are Pentecostal in practice but not in name.  Whilst I am happy to refer to myself as a Pentecostal, I tend to think of myself in a far more granular way. I think it was Wayne Grudem who put a chart in the front of his Systematic Theology that documented his personal position on a range of issues, identifying himself by these rather than by a denominational definition. To address the threads original question. My personal view is that I don't need Commentaries written by Pentecostals but I do need Commentaries that are free from interpretation based on a theological or denominational point of view instead of an accurate analysis of the text in context. I want the commentator, to the best of his or her ability, to tell me what the texts really says and not what he (or I) want it to say.

 

Graham thank you. I can identify very much with all you have said in your post. Yes

Bohuslav

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Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, May 31 2011 8:15 PM

Graham Owen:
Holding a non cessationist view is definitely a big part of being Pentecostal so works by authors who are also non cessationist are helpful but this is not the only factor to take into account.  ...

That is somewhat better than my tongue-in-cheek responseSmile

Dave
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Ron Corbett | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Jun 1 2011 4:19 AM

Dave Hooton:
That is somewhat better than my tongue-in-cheek response

Or ... did you mean, tongues-in-cheek  Stick out tongue

(Sorry, couldn't resist)

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