"The Lexham English Septuagint" missing in Logos 5 Compare Base Package webpage

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LimJK | Forum Activity | Posted: Thu, Nov 8 2012 11:28 PM

Logos,

As I spent some time auditing my Upgraded Resources, I found that "The Lexham English Septuagint" just went missing in Logos 5 Compare Base Package webpage since your last update.

You might want to update it.

JK

MacBookPro Retina 15" Late 2013 2.6GHz RAM:16GB SSD:500GB macOS Sierra 10.12.3 | iPhone 7 Plus iOS 10.2.1

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Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 9 2012 5:58 AM

LimJK ... it shows up on mine .... I assume you're referring to the Logos.com site and the compare packages page.  If I remember right, they said it wouldn't be 'ready' until next year.

Is this what you're referring to?


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Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 9 2012 6:19 AM

Peace!     and               Hi!                        *smile*

Is that the interlinear one

 

1   Μακάριος   ἀνήρ
μακάριος ἀνήρ
JNSM NNSM
blessed, happy man, husband
Blessed is the man
ὃς   οὐκ   ἐπορεύθη   ἐν
ὅς οὐ πορεύομαι ἐν
RR-NSM B VAPI3S P
who, which, that not to make, to go in, into
who not 2 does go 1* in
  βουλῇ   ἀσεβῶν  
βουλή ἀσεβής
NDSF JGPM
counsel, advice ungodly, unholy, profane
the counsel of the ungodly*
καὶ   ἐν   ὁδῷ   ἁμαρτωλῶν   οὐκ  
καί ἐν ὁδός ἁμαρτωλός οὐ
C P NDSF JGPM B
and in, into way sinful not
and in  3 the way  4 of sinners 5 not 2
ἔστη   καὶ  
ἵστημι καί
VAAI3S C
to stand, make stand and
does stand 1 and

Tan, R., deSilva, D. A., & Logos Bible Software. (2009). The Lexham Greek-English Interlinear Septuagint (Ps 1:1). Logos Bible Software.

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

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Rick Brannan (Faithlife) | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 9 2012 6:37 AM

DMB:
 If I remember right, they said it wouldn't be 'ready' until next year.

I can't speak as to the comparison pages, but "The Lexham English Septuagint" is ready and was part of the Logos 5 release.

An associated resource, "The Lexham English Septuagint: Alternate Versions" (unsure of that last word on the title right now) is being wrapped up (I'm writing this post instead of working on it right now, as a matter of fact). It includes translation of the Theodotion edition of Daniel and the additions to Daniel (The LES itself is a translation of the Old Greek of Daniel) and also the alternate edition of Tobit. This should be out by the end of 2012.

One more LXX related item still in progress is the reverse interlinear between Swete's edition of the LXX and the Lexham Hebrew Bible. That will probably be Q1 2013.

Rick Brannan
Data Wrangler, Faithlife
My books in print

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Rick Brannan (Faithlife) | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 9 2012 6:40 AM

Hi Milford.

Milford Charles Murray:
Is that the interlinear one

No, Logos 5 includes a new English translation of the Septuagint that we have titled "The Lexham English Septuagint" (LES). Here's Ps 1.1 in the LES:

     Blessed is the man 
       who does not go in the counsel of the ungodly, 
     and does not stand in the way of sinners, 
       and does not sit in the seat of evil persons. 

 

Rick Brannan
Data Wrangler, Faithlife
My books in print

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Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 9 2012 7:10 AM

Thanks Rick for the clarification.

I'm sure you're on your 'work day' already, but if you pass by here again, how's the new Lexham english LXX compare to NETS?

Specifically what'd you work off of (the LXX itself). I'm guessing the Lexham might be superior to NETS, especially if it's 'tracable' (i.e. even if the user didn't like the translation, in Logos there's the tools to track it down).


Posts 1002
LimJK | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 9 2012 8:15 AM

Rick,

This post is intended for Logos Marketing, or whoever who looks after the website. The item was there in the first release, and when missing after the last update in the Comparison Chart.  I am doing an audit of the L5 Portfolio resources I own, so caught that.

Smile well, at least shows that I am reading your book. Thanks.

JK

MacBookPro Retina 15" Late 2013 2.6GHz RAM:16GB SSD:500GB macOS Sierra 10.12.3 | iPhone 7 Plus iOS 10.2.1

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Rick Brannan (Faithlife) | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 9 2012 8:54 AM

LimJK:
This post is intended for Logos Marketing, or whoever who looks after the website

Understood. I was responding to DMB's query about whether it was actually available or not.

Hope you like the translation!

Rick Brannan
Data Wrangler, Faithlife
My books in print

Posts 1277
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Rick Brannan (Faithlife) | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 9 2012 9:03 AM

DMB:
Specifically what'd you work off of (the LXX itself). I'm guessing the Lexham might be superior to NETS, especially if it's 'tracable' (i.e. even if the user didn't like the translation, in Logos there's the tools to track it down).

The Lexham English Septuagint is based off of Swete's edition of the LXX. This pairs the translation with a solid diplomatic edition, and (even better, IMO) the apparatus that goes with Swete. It also allows us to be completely flexible with derivative products/projects in the future.

I won't compare it one way or the other to NETS; they are each different productions for different audiences with different goals. That comparison is more for readers to make.

I will say that the LES handles proper nouns much differently than NETS or other LXX translations (e.g. Brenton). Here's the relevant section from the introduction.

==========================

NAMES OF PEOPLE, PEOPLE GROUPS, AND PLACES

A longstanding issue in Septuagint studies has been how to render Septuagint names in English. Hatch and Redpath, to their credit, include an appendix of more than 160 pages with listings of Greek proper names, their instances, and their Hebrew equivalents where available. This appendix is the best resource available today on proper nouns in the Septuagint.

Recent Greek–English lexicons of the Septuagint largely skip over the problem. Regarding the inclusion of proper nouns in their lexicon, Lust, Eynikel, and Hauspie note, “Proper names are included only when they are a transliteration of Hebrew words that are common nouns.” Muraoka does not mention proper nouns in his front matter, and he seems to include only the most common proper nouns (e.g., Μωϋσῆς, Moses) in the body of his lexicon. Paradoxically, this means that outside of Hatch and Redpath, one of the best references to consult regarding names in the Septuagint is a lexicon of New Testament Greek, BDAG, which has entries for names that occur in the New Testament, many of which also occur in the Septuagint.

One recent Septuagint translation, NETS, tends to render Greek names by transliteration. They describe their method:  "Names have been treated in essentially two ways: (1) as translations of Hebrew (or Aramaic), i.e., names in general use in the Hellenistic world apart from the LXX, and (2) as transcriptions of Hebrew (or Aramaic), i.e., names produced de novo from the source language. The former have been given their standard equivalent in English (e.g. Egypt and Syria) while the latter appear in English transcription (e.g. Dauid and Salomon)."

Although this is an elegant solution to a complex problem and is faithful to NETS’ underlying method, this solution creates difficulties for those unfamiliar with Greek. Names are difficult enough to track in English translations of the Hebrew Bible; when they are rendered in an English transliteration of their Greek form, some names become virtually impossible to track.

Instead, where possible the LES uses the common English form of the related Hebrew proper noun to render the Greek form of that Hebrew proper noun. For the apocryphal/deuterocanonical books of the Septuagint that have no underlying Hebrew, LES uses the NRSV to maintain the consistency of names.

This strategy also created a lexicon of names, and this lexicon was also used to inform the translation of Septuagint proper names where no direct link could be established with the Hebrew. Where no link of any sort could be established, a transliterated form of the name was used. The result is that the text, for the most part, uses recognizable and familiar forms of names for people, places, and people groups.

The editors realize that at times it is important for scholars and students to have access to the Greek forms of the names as well. To this end, the transliterated forms of Greek proper names are included as footnotes with each instance of a Greek name. However, where the transliterated form of a name matches the name used in the text of the translation, no note is included, since it would be redundant.

The Lexham English Septuagint ( ed. Rick Brannan et al.;Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2012).

==========================

Rick Brannan
Data Wrangler, Faithlife
My books in print

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Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 9 2012 9:13 AM

Thanks Rick ... this really helps. I look forward to it.


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Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 9 2012 9:48 AM

Rick Brannan (Logos):

Hi Milford.

Milford Charles Murray:
Is that the interlinear one

No, Logos 5 includes a new English translation of the Septuagint that we have titled "The Lexham English Septuagint" (LES). Here's Ps 1.1 in the LES:

 

     Blessed is the man 
       who does not go in the counsel of the ungodly, 
     and does not stand in the way of sinners, 
       and does not sit in the seat of evil persons. 

Thanks, Rick!                           Also, I immensely enjoy your RicoBlog -- http://www.supakoo.com/rick/ricoblog/

 

 

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

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Dave Hooton | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Nov 9 2012 3:58 PM

LimJK:

Rick,

This post is intended for Logos Marketing, or whoever who looks after the website. The item was there in the first release, and when missing after the last update in the Comparison Chart.

It's missing from the Upgrade page as well

Dave
===

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