Some History

Page 1 of 3 (57 items) 1 2 3 Next >
This post has 56 Replies | 0 Followers

Posts 218
John Nerdue | Forum Activity | Posted: Thu, Feb 11 2010 7:50 PM

Just thought it might be fun to see some history.

 

New Testament Greek Core Collection (Logos 2.0)

Scholar’s Library Series X (Logos X)

Old Logos Catalog

 

Posts 218
John Nerdue | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Feb 11 2010 8:37 PM

 

 

Posts 8958
Forum MVP
Mark Smith | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Feb 11 2010 9:17 PM

James Chaisson:
Just thought it might be fun to see some history.

Thanks. It is nice to see. Nice to see this as well:

They have kept their promise (up until now. Forever is a long time.)

Pastor, North Park Baptist Church

Bridgeport, CT USA

Posts 18204
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Feb 11 2010 10:12 PM

I just recycled my old Logos 2.0 users' manual and some stuff even older than that. Would have made a good contribution to the history wall. I'm sure Logos has kept archives of this sort of stuff. There's a Microsoft Museum (it used to display the history of Microsoft; now it's more of a showcase for what they're doing currently and their vision for the future, so it has been renamed a Visitors' Center). Maybe someday there will be a Logos Museum.

Posts 5337
Kevin Becker | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2010 4:45 AM

You brought back memories of my first Logos purchase, the Scholar's Library "Series X." Fun stuff.

Posts 218
John Nerdue | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2010 7:15 AM

I am going to post some more as time alows. It would be great to see any old Logos stuff people have pictures of.

Posts 218
John Nerdue | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2010 7:36 AM

Here are screen shots from version 2, 3, (EDIT: X) and 4  (EDIT: I forgot to add Series X screen shot)

 

 

Posts 218
John Nerdue | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2010 8:05 AM

While I'm at it here is an old video you might like.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=62UePvLQ0tM

Why not one more?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G3LZUy4DrXY

 

Posts 187
Rev. D. | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2010 1:02 PM

Wow, thanks for the trip down memory lane. I truly thank God for the evolution of technology that equips us to spread the Gospel.

Christina 

iMac 27 inch, 3.1 GHz Core i5, 1T HD, 4 GB RAM

 

Posts 18204
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 12 2010 1:49 PM

James Chaisson:

While I'm at it here is an old video you might like.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=62UePvLQ0tM

Oh, my! Now that's exciting. 50-100 books on a single CD. Who'd've thunk it? I can't get over what a marketing genius Bob's dad is. Now I'd rush out and buy that product after hearing him and seeing him wave the CD in its jewel case in front of me.Smile

Posts 18204
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Feb 14 2010 12:42 AM

How about this? The Logos website home page from January 11, 1997 (as retrieved by the Internet Archive Wayback Machine; click to enlarge):

Particularly amusing in light of the recent thread announcing that they're getting ready to do a whole new website redesign. The current one is so much better than that old one from 13 years ago, it kind of puts the need for a redesign in perspective... (But I'm still glad they're doing it.)

Also particularly amusing to see the headline "Logos Library System Crosses the 500 Volume Mark" when they're up around 10,000 now. Smile

Posts 18204
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Feb 14 2010 1:05 AM

Here (also from the Internet Archive) is a picture of the box for Logos 2.0 Level 3:

And this is quaint: Smile

Minimum System Requirements

  • Windows 3.1 or Windows 95
  • 386 processor or higher with minimum 4MB of RAM [8 recommended]
  • 256 color graphics
  • Double Speed CD-ROM or higher

Here's what it included:

Logos Bible Study Software 2.0 Level 3 contains:

  • The King James Version: Also known as the "Authorized Version," the KJV is still the most widely used text in the English language. The Logos KJV includes the Strong's Numbers which allow English readers to identify and search for underlying Greek and Hebrew words in the original text; Electronic Edition - Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1995.
  • The New International Version: The NIV has become the best selling English version of the Bible since the King James Version. The NIV follows the principle of "dynamic equivalence" to insure crystal clear understandable English. The NIV may be the most readable English Bible ever produced; from Zondervan, c1984.
  • The American Standard Version 1901: The ASV has long been regarded by many scholars as the most literal English translation since the King James Version- maybe the most literal translation ever. This has made the translation very popular for careful English Bible study, but not for ease of reading. While the KJV was translated entirely from "western manuscripts," the ASV 1901 was influenced also by the older "eastern manuscripts" that form the basis for most of our modern English translations. Because the ASV 1901 is very difficult to find in print, Logos is pleased to be able to preserve and distribute this significant work. This is an excellent choice for comparative English study; Electronic edition - Logos Research Systems, Inc., c1995.
  • The New American Standard Version: While preserving the literal accuracy of the 1901 American Standard Version, the NASB has sought to render grammar and terminology in contemporary English with special attention given to the rendering of verb tenses to give the English reader a rendering as close as possible to the sense of the original Greek and Hebrew texts. Passages with Old English "thee's" and "thou's" etc. have been updated to modern English, along with updates to words whose meanings have changed in the past 20 years. This is an excellent choice for comparative English study; from The Lockman Foundation, c1986.
  • Revised Standard Version: The original Revised Standard Version has served for more than forty-five years. The standard English pew Bible for many denominations, the RSV has become a benchmark for comparison to other English Bibles.
  • Nestle-Aland/UBS Greek with GRAMCORD Morphology: The Greek New Testament UBS 3rd Edition (Corrected) Sometimes referred to as the "critical text" or the "eastern manuscript tradition," this is the Greek text most widely used today. It is the basis for nearly every modern Bible translation in the past one hundred years. The Greek text is identical to the Nestle-Aland 26th/27th Edition. The GRAMCORD morphological concordance of the Greek text is one of the most highly regarded works of its kind in the academic world. Designed to meet the needs of Bible scholars and utilizing the language of seminary environment, this work is desired by the practicing clergy as well as the academic. The Logos 2.0 implementation of the GRAMCORD data base offers the additional usefulness of a non-technical interface, thereby allowing an even broader audience access to the data.
  • BHS (Hebrew) with Westminster Morphology: K. Elliger, Editor. A revision of Kittel, Biblia Hebraica, prepared by H. P. Ruger and other scholars on the basis of the Leningrad Public Library manuscript B 19A Copyright 1984 by the United Bible Societies. Often referred to as the "Masoretic Text" or simply "BHS," this is the Hebrew text most widely used today. It is the basis for nearly every modern Bible translation. Containing both full diacritical annotation and vowel pointing, it is the text of choice in most seminaries, Bible colleges, and universities.
  • Septuagint with Morphology (Alfred Rahlf's): The Septuagint (LXX ) is the Greek translation of the Hebrew Scriptures, which according to tradition was done by seventy Jewish scholars (hence the name) sometime in the 3rd century BC. It is the Bible which the Greek-speaking world read during the time of the apostles, to which Paul would have referred in his dealings with his churches. The Rahlf's edition is the most modern critical edition of this text. The morphology, prepared by the University of Pennsylvania, gives the user the ability to draw parsing and glossary information directly from the text, which is especially important because the Greek of the LXX is significantly different from that of the NT.
  • Vine's Expository Dictionary: meanings of Greek and Hebrew words to life for the : Vine's Expository Dictionary brings the student possessing a comprehensive, a limited or a non-existent knowledge of the original languages. Vine's includes both Old Testament and New Testament words in this complete expository dictionary of more than 6,000 biblical words from the original Hebrew or Greek. When you put Vine's Expository Dictionary together with Logos Bible Study Software and Strong's Numbers you have a link from the original language to the exact Strong's number which can be researched further in any other lexicon or reference work you have. Vine's has been a choice of scholars and laymen alike when they need to gain a comprehensive understanding of the original language meanings from some of the world's foremost Greek and Hebrew experts; from F. H. Revell Co., c1981.
  • Tense, Voice, Mood: Tense, Voice, Mood is a database of parsings for every verb in Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia Hebrew and Nestle-Aland, Byzantine Majority, and Textus Receptus 1550 Greek texts. Verbs' forms are assigned numbers like Strong's numbers. The parsings are based on two 19th century works edited by George V. Wigram, Analytical Greek Lexicon of the New Testament and Englishman's Hebrew and Chaldee Concordance of the Old Testament. In Logos Bible Study Software 2.0 the TVM number is automatically displayed at the bottom of your workspace as you draw your cursor over the King James Version of the Bible; Electronic Edition: Logos Research Systems, Inc. c1995.
  • Theological Dictionary of the New Testament: "Little Kittel" is considered by many to be the best New Testament dictionary ever compiled. It contains 2300 entries which cover the spectrum of biblical topics from "A to Z." The one-volume abridgment of the 10-vol. Theological Dictionary of the New Testament, keeps most if not all of the information that pastors and laypeople can use, leaving out the technical and bibliographic information. It explores how each word is used, often in detail, explaining and expounding the underlying concepts. As a consequence, within 2.0, this work allows people who are not scholars to develop a deep understanding of the meaning and usage of words and concepts in the NT, letting them appreciate the nuances of meaning in the text and giving them a deeper understanding of what the biblical author is saying.
  • A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament: Bauer, Arndt, Gingrich and Danker Recognized by many as the most comprehensive Greek-English lexicon available. A working knowledge of the Greek alphabet is necessary, as all word listings are in Greek. The lexicon lists English translation options for each New Testament Greek word, and gives citations for the use of these words in classical Greek writers, in the Septuagint, throughout the New Testament, and in Patristic Greek (the early church fathers).
  • Liddell and Scott's Intermediate Greek Lexicon: An abridgment of the Oxford Greek Lexicon, the most complete standard reference for ancient Greek from Homer to the Patristic writings (with excellent coverage from NT and Septuagint Greek)
  • Louw-Nida Greek Lexicon: A modern Greek lexicon using the concept of "semantic domains." This lexicon differs from other lexicons in that it does not arrange words alphabetically and it does not give one listing of a word with all of that word's meanings after it. Instead, it breaks words down by their various shades of meaning. It then groups all of those entries together and organizes them by topics and sub-topics. It shows the nuances in word meanings and explains difficult expressions and idiomatic usages of words, and even provides advice on how words might be translated under various conditions. Since it groups words by meanings, it shows distinctions in meaning between similar words, and also between differences in one word's meaning in different contexts, as well as showing the overlaps between word meanings.
  • Greek New Testament Insert - Chapman: This is a book on Koine (Koy-nay) Greek grammar (the spoken Greek of the NT period, and the Greek used in the New Testament). The insert is clearly designed to be an aid to the reader/exegete of the Greek New Testament. The nature of the insert is not necessarily lexical or morphological, rather it strives to educate the user regarding grammatical and syntactical issues faced by the student of the Greek New Testament and Koine Greek in general. The insert is a tremendous compliment to the Greek lexicons, texts, and morphology.
  • New Bible Dictionary: The New Bible Dictionary is a unique work of reference, ideally suited for people of all ages and backgrounds. An "A to Z" of Bible terms, written by an international team of more than 150 scholars. Includes more than 2,000 entries with notes on place-names, studies of words and doctrines and comprehensive articles on books and people of the Bible. To help clarify the text it includes maps, family trees, line drawings, diagrams, and charts. It is a magnificent and comprehensive Bible Dictionary which will greatly increase the knowledge and understanding of God's Word. This is an invaluable reference book for schools and colleges, for theological and Bible college students, ministers and layman, teachers and professional scholars - everyone who is interested in understanding the Bible; from Tyndale House Publishers, c1982.
  • Harper's Bible Dictionary: is a magnificent companion to the Harper's Bible Commentary. It allows you to understand, in all their contexts, the texts of the Old Testament, the Apocrypha, and the New Testament. It's completely up to date, and represents the best current biblical scholarship. The entire volume is written by 180 members of the Society of Biblical Literature, and contains 3500 articles.
  • Bible Knowledge Commentary: Bible Knowledge Commentary is a verse by verse, phrase by phrase walk through the entire Bible. This commentary explains problem passages, alleged discrepancies, customs, geographical locations, key Hebrew and Aramaic words. It includes for each book an introduction (discussion of author, historical background, purpose, features), outline, commentary, and bibliography. It contains over 100 maps, charts, and diagrams; from Victor Books, c1983-c1985.
  • Matthew Henry's Commentary on the whole Bible Complete and Unabridged: An eighteenth-century masterwork of learning and devotion, is commonly available in the original six-volume edition or in greatly abridged (or even re-written) one-volume editions. Now with the space saving technology of CD-ROM Logos is pleased to bring you the complete and unabridged edition of this time treasured work. Matthew Henry (1662-1714) studied law at Gray's Inn and was ordained a Presbyterian minister in 1687. He served churches in Chester and in Hackney, near London. He began writing his famous commentary in 1701. Matthew Henry's warm mix of scholarship and practical application has made his commentary a favorite of preachers and devotional readers alike for two hundred years; from Hendrickson Publishers, c1991.
  • Harper's Bible Commentary: Written by 82 members of the Society of Biblical Literature. This readable commentary introduces each book of the Bible and interprets it section by section. Lively general articles place the Bible in its historical, literary, and interpretive contexts. Entries are also cross referenced to the companion Harper's Bible Dictionary.
  • The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge: One of the most comprehensive sets of cross references ever compiled, consisting of over 572,000 entries. This great reference tool is an invaluable asset for your Bible study library. Logos 2.0 makes it even more of an attractive and interactive study aid by making every single reference in the book a hot spot. Simply click on any reference in The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge and instantly jump to that verse. Hit the "return" button on your toolbar and instantly jump back to where you were. With this powerful functionality available in Logos 2.0, you will find yourself looking up more cross-references and getting a better understanding of the text than you ever would have, when you had to sit down and flip through your Bible manually. The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge helps you get more Bible into your Bible study; from Barbour & Co., Inc.
  • New Nave's Topical Bible: The best known and most comprehensive topical Bible, containing over 20,000 topics and sub-topics with over 100,000 scripture references. Logos' New Nave's includes 260 new articles and more than 1,300 new topics. Logos New Nave's also features more than 1,500 modernization's of archaic English terms. Combined with Logos Bible software, Nave's becomes more useful than ever. With Logos Bible Software you can even use the Nave's topic as a search parameter. For example, search for the word "love" within the verses associated with the Nave's topic "marriage." Copy search results to topic lists and your word processor. Billy Graham says of the Nave's Topical Bible - "Outside of the Bible this is the book that I depend on more than any other. Certainly there has been no book that has helped me more in my study." Revised and expanded; Electronic Edition: Logos Research Systems, 1994.
  • New Topical Textbook: Written in the tradition of Nave's Topical Bible, the New Topical Textbook is a practical tool for approaching the Bible text by topic. The most useful aspect of this work is that it is surprisingly different from Nave's in its selection of topics; Fleming H. Revell Co., c1897.
  • The Complete Guide to Bible Versions: Philip Comfort presents an easy to-understand guide to English Bible translations. Comfort explains in simple terms how the Old and New Testaments have been passed down to us today, including what important ancient manuscripts were involved. He also guides the reader through the fascinating (and often inspirational) history of English Bible translations, showing how different Bible versions are related. Differences in several of today's common English versions are drawn out, providing an important guide for choosing between the often confusing plethora of English Bible versions currently available; from Tyndale House Publishers, 1991.
  • Logos Bible Map Set: The maps included in the map set are similar in scope to a set of maps found at the back of most Bibles. The Logos Bible Map Set offers a quick reference guide to the geography of Bible lands.
  • Strong's Numbers: So you didn't go to seminary for four years? No problem! English readers can easily identify and search for over 14,000 underlying Greek and Hebrew words in the original text. Choose to either view the KJV with the Strong's Numbers inline, or view the text only. Just click on the Strong's Number to identify the underlying Greek or Hebrew words from the original text. We've added a new depth of additional information to your Personal Bible Study without forcing you to know a single word of Greek or Hebrew!
  • Strong's Expanded Dictionary: These classic Strong's dictionary definitions have been painstakingly enhanced with definitions from the Brown, Driver, Briggs and Thayer lexicons. Click on Strong's Numbers from the King James, or perform a search on any Strong's Number, and instantly view the underlying word in the actual Greek or Hebrew right next to a phoenetic English pronunciation guide. All entries include definitions of each word along with a wealth of additional information taken from recognized authorities in the field.
  • Pilgrim's Progress: The classic work by John Bunyan is known as the greatest allegory in the English language; Electronic edition: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1995.
  • Morning and Evening: This has been the classic daily devotional for thousands of Christians for over a century. Each day's devotions are available to you from the browser, choose today's devotion and it will bring up the appropriate devotion tied to that day and time based on your computer's internal clock, or look forward or backward through the 732 inspirational devotions and read Spurgeon's thoughts for any day of the year. More than a devotional, Spurgeon's Morning and Evening combined with the Logos 2.0 search engine allows you to gain insight into the mind of Spurgeon on your search topics. Expand your searches to include Spurgeon's Morning and Evening and when you do a search on a scripture that he has expounded on your search results will bring his insight into your study; from Hendrickson Publishers, c1991.
  • The Confessions of St. Augustine: The classical autobiographical work of a great saint. His theocentric testimonial of his conversion experience and his growing understanding of God. A moving depiction of the life and experiences of a believer from a different age. A must have for those who wish to move into a deeper relationship with God; Electronic edition: Logos Research Systems, c 1996.
  • 100 MIDI Hymns: All 100 MIDI hymns are provided for playback or reading, including the standard MIDI music files and the complete fully searchable lyrics for each hymn. Use the hymns royalty free, load them info your music software and make your own arrangements, or just have the hymns playing while you meditate on God's Word.
  • Electronic User's Guide: Better than help files, we have actually made our user's guide into a real electronic book! Forget frustrating help file indices, now you can search your entire user's guide for all occurances of any word or subject.
Posts 218
John Nerdue | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Feb 14 2010 4:56 AM

Rosie Perera:
Particularly amusing in light of the recent thread announcing that they're getting ready to do a whole new website redesign.

 

I was thinking the same thing

Posts 218
John Nerdue | Forum Activity | Replied: Sun, Feb 14 2010 5:00 AM

Rosie Perera:
Here (also from the Internet Archive) is a picture of the box for Logos 2.0 Level 3

Thanks for adding this.

I like seeing all the old stuff from Logos. Makes me appreciate the things they offer now. It also gives people a place to check what older pakages contained and what was removed from newer ones.

Posts 218
John Nerdue | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Feb 17 2010 6:46 AM

I have created a few collections in L3 sowing the books that some of the older Logos libraries contained. For example "The Core New Testament Greek" collection, "Logos 2.0 Level 3" collection, "Logos 2.0 Personal Bible Study" collection, and "Series X Scholar's Library".

This way I can, at a glance, see which books were in a collection and which books were removed. If  anyone wants these collection files let me know and I will see about sending them in an email or something like that.

Posts 18204
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Feb 17 2010 10:18 PM

James Chaisson:

I have created a few collections in L3 sowing the books that some of the older Logos libraries contained. For example "The Core New Testament Greek" collection, "Logos 2.0 Level 3" collection, "Logos 2.0 Personal Bible Study" collection, and "Series X Scholar's Library".

This way I can, at a glance, see which books were in a collection and which books were removed. If  anyone wants these collection files let me know and I will see about sending them in an email or something like that.

If you're running the beta (4.0b) they've added a new feature to be able to export a collection to a bibliography. Then you could post the text file(s) here. I think it would be useful to have them available as a reference for when other people ask this question. Would you do that, please? You can post them as an attachment by clicking on the paperclip icon in compose mode.

Posts 218
John Nerdue | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Feb 18 2010 5:37 PM

Rosie Perera:
If you're running the beta (4.0b) they've added a new feature to be able to export a collection to a bibliography. Then you could post the text file(s) here. I think it would be useful to have them available as a reference for when other people ask this question. Would you do that, please? You can post them as an attachment by clicking on the paperclip icon in compose mode.

I don't know what version of L4 I am running. I haven't made any collections in L4 do your collections in L3 transfer over to L4? If not I can see about recreating them in L4 and then upload them.

Just for some more fun here are a few more pictures from Old Logos Software. These are from Logos 1.6D.

Posts 18204
Rosie Perera | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 19 2010 12:39 AM

James Chaisson:

I don't know what version of L4 I am running.

You can find out by clicking on the Help menu (? icon) and selecting About Logos Bible Software:

Then the version number will be displayed in the upper left corner of the About box:

James Chaisson:

I haven't made any collections in L4 do your collections in L3 transfer over to L4? If not I can see about recreating them in L4 and then upload them.

No, L3 collections don't transfer over. I hadn't read your post carefully enough and I thought you already had the collections in L4. But L3 had a Bibliography command already, so you can export these collections without recreating them in L4. In L3, go to Tools | Bibliography. Click at the top, where it says "Choose a collection..." and choose a collection. In the dropdown to the right of that, select Titles:

Then you can do File | Export, select "Text file" for the "Save as type." Then post the text file here as an attachment.

Posts 4563
David Paul | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 19 2010 2:26 AM

 It wasn't my first purchase, but I remember taking the leap and dropping what at the time I thought was HUGE BUCK$ (the 90's were a quaint time, yes?) on the Scholar's pack that had the cool Bible bookshelf tie (circled in blue).

I loved that tie...got a lot of complements on it back in the suit and tie days of church. I haven't seen that tie in years, in fact, I haven't worn a tie in years. I wear sandals to my Torah study even when it's snowing. Gotta love the freedom of Torah!!  Yes Smile

That purchase was a bump up from the top Nelson package I started with, then I got sucked into upgrading to Silver, then upgrading to Gold, then there were an innumerable multitude of PrePubs...and all the while I was wondering if I'd ever be able to get my Platinum fix. Much to my surprise I skipped right over the heavy metal in favor of a leatherette Portfolio!!  Whodathunkit?

Not that I'm complaining, Bob...but are you sure there isn't nicotine in this stuff you're peddling? Wink

Oh...one final, thought--The tie is still the best tchotchke Logos has ever ponied up. I usually like t-shirts, but the GIANT "4!" just left me befuddled. No one could ever possibly know what that stood for unless they already owned L4. It didn't even have any indication that it was related to Bible study, software, or anything else for that matter.  Kinda strange.

Btw, Bob...I have a killer idea for a t-shirt...you may even decide to use it as your main Logos slogan.

Posts 3163
Dominick Sela | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Feb 19 2010 3:25 AM

Rosie Perera:

James Chaisson:

I don't know what version of L4 I am running.

 

You can find out by clicking on the Help menu (? icon) and selecting About Logos Bible Software:

Then the version number will be displayed in the upper left corner of the About box:

James Chaisson:

I haven't made any collections in L4 do your collections in L3 transfer over to L4? If not I can see about recreating them in L4 and then upload them.

 

 

No, L3 collections don't transfer over. I hadn't read your post carefully enough and I thought you already had the collections in L4. But L3 had a Bibliography command already, so you can export these collections without recreating them in L4. In L3, go to Tools | Bibliography. Click at the top, where it says "Choose a collection..." and choose a collection. In the dropdown to the right of that, select Titles:

Then you can do File | Export, select "Text file" for the "Save as type." Then post the text file here as an attachment.

 

Rosie you aren't saying you can import this collection text file from L3 into L4 are you? If so I was not aware of that.  How do you do it? (I still have a lot more Collections in L3 than I do L4!)

Page 1 of 3 (57 items) 1 2 3 Next > | RSS