A High Priority, please, for The Apocrypha: The Lutheran Edition with Notes

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Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Posted: Thu, Oct 11 2012 4:02 PM

Peace and Joy to my Logos Forums Brothers and Sisters!                                 *smile*

                   For financial reasons I need to wait for the digital work; and I hope it is relatively soon.  Concordia Publishing House has a good record of working with Logos Bible Software and some truly great works.  No reason to believe that this book won't be coming soon, I guess; but I'm a bit "antsy" about it!               *smile*

                                http://www.cph.org/p-19305-the-apocrypha-the-lutheran-edition-with-notes.aspx?utm_source=CPH+eNews+Newsletter&utm_campaign=21d7672f28-10_12_12_Apocrypha_Endorsements_512793_149_28_2012&utm_medium=email#video

Rediscover a great biblical and literary classic. For more than 100 years, the Apocrypha has been left out of English versions of the Bible. Concordia Publishing House is proud to announce the 2012 release of the first and only ESV edition of the Apocrypha with notes and annotations by Lutherans. Described by Martin Luther as useful texts to read, but not divinely inspired, the Apocrypha allows Lutherans to look back at their heritage and see the Bible as our forefathers would have. Furthermore, the texts of the Apocrypha are essential reading for filling in the 400-year gap between the Old and New Testaments. A key resource for understanding the New Testament’s background, Concordia’s The Apocrypha will include notes, maps, charts, illustrations, introductions to the books, and an extensive set of articles that will provide guidance to those who are studying ancient literatures such as the Dead Sea Scrolls. This Study Bible-style treatment of the Apocrypha is certain to be the most extensive, popular edition available; especially to those eager to study the unique Lutheran perspective on these books and the time between the testaments. Features of The Apocrypha
  • ESV text
  • Lutheran notes
  • Maps
  • Charts
  • Illustrations
  • Book introductions
  • Helpful articles

 

 

 

 

Some endorsements:

Endorsements—The Apocrypha: The Lutheran Edition with Notes

"Scripture in Jesus’ Judaism and in the Early Church included more documents than those found in the Protestant canon. Some of these works, called “Apocrypha” by Protestants and “Deuteron-canonical Works” by Roman Catholics are expertly and attractively collected in The Apocrypha: The Lutheran Edition with Notes. In these writings you will find a deep expression of the need for God’s forgiveness (the Prayer of Manasseh) and a vision of the future with the coming of the Messiah (2 Esdras or Ezra Apocalypse = 4 Ezra). The introductions are superbly well written and engaging. One can see how the Apocrypha...bridges the “Old” Testament with the “New” Testament. Highly recommended, as Athanasius said in 367 “for instruction in the word of godliness.”
James H. Charlesworth
Director and Editor, Princeton Dead Sea Scrolls Project
George L. Collord Professor of New Testament Language and Literature
Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey

"Quite likely, The Apocrypha: The Lutheran Edition with Notes is the product of one of the most ambitious projects dealing with the Apocrypha ever undertaken. Not only does it offer an unfailingly accurate translation of the various texts involved, via the English Standard Version, but it is also replete with scholarly notes and commentary to assist the reader—lay or professional—in every way possible."
—From the foreword by Rev. Paul L. Maier, PhD
The Russell H. Seibert Professor of Ancient History
Western Michigan University

"This book provides a well-balanced blend of sound scholarship and religious beliefs on the Apocrypha, especially those of Luther and the Lutherans. The reader will find all the necessary background information on the Apocrypha in an attractive presentation, as well as religious guidance for instruction and preaching. A wealth of introductory essays and appendixes make this a very useful compendium."
—Prof. Emanuel Tov, PhD
J. L. Magnes Professor of Bible
Hebrew University, Jerusalem
"Concordia Publishing House, General editor Edward Engelbrecht, and the several contributing editors have placed Bible scholars and students into their debt by bringing out a new and updated version of The Apocrypha: The Lutheran Edition with Notes. The introduction includes explanation of what the books of the Apocrypha are, what their value is, and a concise overview of history from Persian rule to Roman rule. Next come judicious commentaries on the several books of the Apocrypha, followed by ten appendices that provide readers with additional related information concerning such things as the Dead Sea Scrolls, the writings of Josephus, rabbinic literature, and New Testament Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha. What a treasure trove! This marvelous commentary belongs in the study of every student and scholar of the Bible."
—Rev. Craig A. Evans, PhD
Payzant Distinguished Professor of New Testament
Acadia Divinity College, Nova Scotia, Canada
"Luther recommended the Apocrypha as books that are not regarded as equal to the Holy Scripture, and yet are profitable and good to read. Lutheran piety up to now seems to have remembered just the first part of this statement and did not very often exercise itself in the profitable reading. This present edition gives us occasion to get a fresh approach to books like Wisdom of Solomon, Maccabees, and others. Accompanied with quotations mainly from Luther and John Gerhard, and useful explanations, the reader may gain a deeply spiritual approach to the Apocrypha and explore anew these treasures of the Lutheran faith!"
—Prof. Dr. Volker Leppin
Eberhard Karls Universität
Tübingen, Germany
"I recommend this edition of the Apocrypha as a timely and useful addition to The Lutheran Study Bible. The Apocrypha have been considered as a part of the biblical canon for most of the church’s history, and while the Reformers may have had good reasons for thinking differently, they still had a high regard for them. This edition enables both scholars and lay readers to understand why."
—Knut Alfsvåg, ThD
Professor of Systematic Theology
School of Mission and Theology, Stavanger, Norway
"The books of the Apocrypha are absolutely essential for understanding the Jewish context of early Christianity. The Apocrypha: The Lutheran Edition with Notes is an outstanding work of scholarship that provides a welcome service to Lutherans and, indeed, to Christians of other traditions interested in reading and studying these fascinating and often entertaining writings, which the great Luther himself deemed “useful and good to read.” A thoughtfully edited and attractively produced volume, it includes many unique features and has the fullest annotations of any comparable study edition. In all, this is a monumental achievement and valuable resource for scholars, students, and lay people alike."
—Daniel C. Harlow, PhD
Professor of Religion, Calvin College
Editor, The Eerdmans Dictionary of Early Judaism
"One of the great rewards of biblical study is an increased awareness of the historical and cultural setting in which the Scriptures were written. In The Apocrypha: The Lutheran Edition with Notes, Editor Engelbrecht and his team of contributors has provided an attractive and accessible overview of one of the most interesting periods in the Bible’s history, namely, the Intertestamental or Second Temple Period. It was during this time that the Old Testament was completed and the New Testament was on the threshold of emerging. Succinct introductions with helpful maps and diagrams enrich the presentation. A distinctive strength is the churchly and confessional assessment from a Lutheran perspective that provides a framework for the historical material--a significant contribution that lifts the reader beyond the merely academic."

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

Posts 5262
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 11 2012 4:41 PM

Were I able to prioritize things my wish would put this item Just below the New Interpreter's Bible and right above the REB+NEB translations. I will gladly put this into my pre pub even if there is no discount offered off the list price.

-Dan

Yes

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Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Oct 11 2012 4:54 PM

Dan Francis:

Were I able to prioritize things my wish would put this item Just below the New Interpreter's Bible and right above the REB+NEB translations. I will gladly put this into my pre pub even if there is no discount offered off the list price.

-Dan

Yes

Yes, Dan!              Gladly!                Me too!             *smile*                            Peace!

                 (BTW, did you hear of the Sunday School child who came home and told Mommy they had studied about a bear in Sunday School.  The mother enquired of the pastor who said, "Well, I'm not quite sure exactly what your child is referring to; however, we did sing "Gladly, The Cross I'd Bear" yesterday morning.????)

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

Posts 30
Paul T. McCain | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 12 2012 6:02 AM

Definitely in the works, folks. Look for it in early 2013.

 

Paul McCain

Publisher

Concordia Publishing House

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Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Fri, Oct 12 2012 1:41 PM

Paul, Thank you so very much!          Indeed!                               Great news!                Well done by you and your compatriots and very much appreciated!  Some truly amazing endorsements!                 Wow!                            Again ....    Well Done!                                     Peace to you!       .... and ....      Always Joy in the Lord!           *smile*

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

Posts 236
Mikko Paavola | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Nov 10 2012 6:48 AM

Here it is: http://www.logos.com/product/28436/the-apocrypha-the-lutheran-edition-with-notes

 

Thank you very much!

 

Faithlife Connect + several Base Packages + Luther's Works, etc.
Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 260, Win 10 Pro, Intel Core i7-6500U, 16GB RAM, 256GB SSD, Intel HD Graphics 520.
iPhone 7 Plus.

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Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Sat, Sep 21 2013 4:00 AM

Bump!

It's in development           Perhaps it won't be too much longer???     *smile*

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

Posts 25
Scott E. Heitshusen | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Sep 30 2013 3:10 PM

Paul,

Any thoughts or insights on the status of this? The bar from "pre-pub" moved along well in January and February but once it reached the end with the current "Under Development", it appears "stuck" there for about 6 months or so.

Looking forward to it.

Scott

https://www.logos.com/product/28436/the-apocrypha-the-lutheran-edition-with-notes

Posts 25
Scott E. Heitshusen | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Oct 28 2013 7:10 AM

Ok, so it's been over 10 months this was introduced as a pre-pub and it's reached the "end of the green line" progression to the "under contract" for around six months...

ANY WORD ON THIS?

It seems "stuck" or "forgotten." Is there a remedy for that?

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Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Oct 28 2013 7:59 AM

Peace, Scott!                        Stuck indeed!                         Hope NOT forgotten!                 *smile*

                Am eagerly looking forward to this one ...                        Logos and CPH should sell lots of these, and I'm sure they want it to "fly" soon, eh?

Just looked again at the Logos.com info .........    Did you see some of the "praise" comments?           Wow!

Praise for the Print Edition

The introductions are superbly well written and engaging. One can see how the Apocrypha . . . bridges the ‘Old’ Testament with the ‘New’ Testament. Highly recommended, as Athanasius said in 367 ‘for instruction in the word of godliness.’

—James H. Charlesworth, George L. Collord Professor of New Testament Language and Literature, Princeton University

One of the most ambitious projects dealing with the Apocrypha ever undertaken. . . . it is also replete with scholarly notes and commentary to assist the reader—lay or professional—in every way possible.

—From the foreword by Rev. Paul L. Maier, The Russell H. Seibert Professor of Ancient History, Western Michigan University

This book provides a well-balanced blend of sound scholarship and religious beliefs on the Apocrypha, especially those of Luther and the Lutherans. The reader will find all the necessary background information on the Apocrypha in an attractive presentation, as well as religious guidance for instruction and preaching. A wealth of introductory essays and appendixes make this a very useful compendium.

—Emanuel Tov, J. L. Magnes Professor of Bible, Hebrew University

The introduction includes explanation of what the books of the Apocrypha are, what their value is, and a concise overview of history from Persian rule to Roman rule. Next come judicious commentaries on the several books of the Apocrypha, followed by 10 appendices that provide readers with additional related information concerning such things as the Dead Sea Scrolls, the writings of Josephus, rabbinic literature, and New Testament Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha. What a treasure trove! This marvelous commentary belongs in the study of every student and scholar of the Bible.

—Craig A. Evans, Payzant Distinguished Professor of New Testament, Acadia Divinity College

An outstanding work of scholarship that provides a welcome service to Lutherans and, indeed, to Christians of other traditions interested in reading and studying these fascinating and often entertaining writings, which the great Luther himself deemed ‘useful and good to read.’ A thoughtfully edited and attractively produced volume, it includes many unique features and has the fullest annotations of any comparable study edition. In all, this is a monumental achievement and valuable resource for scholars, students, and lay people alike.

—Daniel C. Harlow, Professor of Religion, Calvin College

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

Posts 10522
Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Oct 28 2013 8:08 AM

Tov and Charlesworth on the same page?  Plus Evens too?  It's almost like earthquakes, tsunami, and a new iPhone all at the same time!

Clearly this is a sign.   I'm sure at Logos, they're scurrying around to get this out!!

"I didn't know God made honky tonk angels."

Posts 25
Scott E. Heitshusen | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Oct 28 2013 12:07 PM

I was gifted the hard copy and want to pass it on to a fellow pastor when this Logos version comes out. The hard copy is fantastic; along the same lines as the hard copy of The Lutheran Study Bible.

In any event, I'm just hoping someone at Logos looks through the forums and nudges those working on this to get it out the door.

Posts 25
Scott E. Heitshusen | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 11 2013 2:00 PM

I want to keep this on the Logos Team's radar as we're now around 11 months out from when this was offered as a pre-pub. 

Come on, Logos! PLEASE get this out!!!

Posts 5262
Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 11 2013 2:49 PM

I am very anxious for this too bur sometimes (probably most times), it is not Logos dragging their feet but other issues from not being given the text from the publisher, to complications (I halfway suspect that Logos wishes to give us not only the notes but the text too... but this will mean getting permission from Oxford University Press who did the ESV Apocrypha ). I wish it was coming out tomorrow, but know Logos is not going to be able to make that happen. One example is the Word Biblical Commentaries that are under contract, after much complaining we were told Thomas Nelson had yet to release the text for them to work with. It would be nice to think they could grab one at the local bookstore and scan it in, but that is not how it works.

-Dan

Posts 2038
Unix | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Nov 11 2013 6:25 PM

I have pre-ordered it on Sept. 3. 2013, and I hesitate keeping the order because of the Lutheran perspective. I fail to agree with much of Lutheranism. Can anyone convince me?

Also, I certainly would not use it with the ESV, but with the REB, and for some of parts of Sirach translated from Hebrew the NRSV.

I really would need to cancel some pre-pub order because I have too many of them.

I also wonder how conservative it might be?

Aply!
trulyergonomic.com 6,200own
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Dan Francis | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Nov 12 2013 12:06 PM

Unix:
I also wonder how conservative it might be?

It will likely be fairly conservative since it is  Concordia that has done it, they are a fairly conservative wing of Lutherans. Since it is a companion to the newer Lutheran Study Bible a quick look at it may tell you something. Since Sirach is a particular interest to you a look into proverbs may give you an idea or how it will be treated. Here is the exposition of Proverbs 8.

------


Ch 8 Second poem about wisdom. The first poem was 1:20–33.

8:1 Does not wisdom call? Opening rhetorical question assumes that everyone reading is aware of wisdom’s invitation. her. Wisdom is personified as a good woman, in stark contrast to the adulterous woman of ch 7. See “Supposed Remnants of Goddess Worship,” p 997.

8:2 at the crossroads she takes her stand. Here and in vv 3–4, wisdom stations herself to be heard in the midst of life. She calls out for travelers on their way in and out of the town.

8:4 men … children of man. Wisdom’s invitation is for all; her call is universal.

8:5 simple ones … fools. Here, as elsewhere in Pr, wisdom offers her message and benefits to those who are unschooled and vulnerable. Because sin taints every human mind and heart, all people meet her description.

8:6 noble … right. Wisdom’s message fills the mind and heart with all good things. Paul reflects this call to things noble and true in Php 4:8. To these, add truth (v 7) and righteousness (v 8). This is the first time these virtuous descriptors are clearly tied to wisdom’s message. Solomon is bringing his students to a new level of understanding wisdom.

8:7–8 wickedness. Solomon contrasts the virtues of wisdom’s message with its opposites. The parallelism of the contrasting realities clarifies and heightens the value of wisdom’s virtues.

8:9 Wisdom’s message is grasped rightly by those who have the knowledge of God (2:5).

8:10–11 instead of silver … rather than choice gold. Unlike Lady Folly, wisdom asks no money. The riches she offers surpass any object of human desire.

8:12–14 Wisdom’s attributes parallel the gifts of the Spirit of the Messiah in Is 11:1–3, clearly identifying Christ as our wisdom.

8:13 The fear of the LORD is hatred of evil. See notes, 1:7; 2:5. The more we lovingly revere God, trusting exclusively in His wisdom, the more we will hate and shun evil. In this sense, we take on God’s own character in detesting what is evil in His sight (6:16–19). See note, Ps 5:5.

8:15–16 kings … rulers … princes … nobles. Wisdom is a crucial asset for those who govern. Their just government evidences the wisdom of God, who sets governments in place and uses them for His purposes (Rm 13:4).

8:17 I love those who love me. Wisdom is set into the context of an intimate relationship. The verse’s second line adds to the thought of the first, promising that those who love and seek Wisdom will find her. Cf 1Co 12:8, 31. seek … find. Words used often in Proverbs for the quest for wisdom (2:4–5; 3:13; 4:22).

8:18–19 enduring wealth … fruit … yield. Agricultural language accents Wisdom as a renewing resource, promising future blessings, in contrast with the stagnant wealth of precious metals and gems.

8:20 the way … the paths. Wisdom walks with those who seek righteousness and justice. See p 844. Jesus described Himself as the way (Jn 14:6).

8:21 granting an inheritance to those who love me. Riches that come to those who follow God’s Wisdom, the Christ, are celebrated in several NT passages: Eph 2:7; 3:8–10; Php 4:19; Col 1:27; 2:2. granting an inheritance. Paul celebrates the rich inheritance of those who are in Christ (Eph 1:13–14; Col 1:10–12).

8:22–31 Poem about God’s use of wisdom in creation.

8:22 possessed Me at the beginning. See ESV note. Just as Solomon’s students are encouraged to acquire or possess Wisdom (1:5; 4:5, 7), so the Lord possesses Wisdom in eternity, even before His act of creation. This personification of wisdom points to the eternal nature of the pre-incarnate Christ, present at creation (Jn 1:1–3). Just: “The Word of Wisdom, who is Himself this God begotten of the Father of all things, and Word, and Wisdom, and Power, and the Glory of the Begetter, will bear evidence to me, when He speaks by Solomon” (ANF 1:227).

8:23 set up. Hbr word here is used elsewhere in the Bible only for God’s coronation of a king (Ps 2:6). Variant of the word can also mean “to weave,” as woven or knit in the womb (Ps 139:13), here then referring to Wisdom begotten of God. For Christ as appointed Messiah before creation, cf Mi 5:2; Jn 17:5.

8:24–26 brought forth … brought forth. Special form of Hbr verb chul. Term can describe various forms of movement, such as dancing or writhing in pain (as in giving birth). This anticipates the NT language describing Jesus as “begotten,” the eternal generation of the Son from the Father, before time and space were created. Before … before … before. Threefold repetition shows Wisdom to be eternal (cf “before all things” [Col 1:17], clearly not a part of creation).

8:26 dust. Plural in Hbr. The countless particles that make up the world.

Christ as Wisdom

According to Proverbs, Wisdom was present already in eternity, before the creation of the world and, consequently, before there even was such a thing as time. Along the same lines, Jesus said, “And now, Father, glorify Me in Your own presence with the glory that I had with You before the world existed” (Jn 17:5). In Pr 8, Wisdom is given birth by God, even though Wisdom was present from eternity. Likewise, Jesus is God’s only-begotten Son; that is, “His only Son” (Jn 3:16).
John’s Gospel begins with a description of Jesus as “the Word.” This description connects Jesus with the Wisdom of Proverbs, which calls out and makes its appeals. John declares, “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God” (Jn 1:1–2). Wisdom was also present with God in the beginning (Pr 8:22).

An Ancient Yet Modern Controversy
In the fourth century after Christ, a controversy broke out in the Christian churches. Focusing on this portion of Proverbs, the followers of the priest Arius argued that the Son of God was a created being and not eternal God. They argued that there was a time when the Son of God did not exist. Much of their argument rested on a faulty Greek translation of Pr 8:22: “The LORD created Me,” instead of “The LORD possessed Me.”
In our day, the Jehovah’s Witnesses have taken up this ancient heresy and contend that Jesus, the Son of God, is not true God. To support their false doctrine, they even mistranslate Scripture, such as Jn 1:1. Their New World Translation says, “The Word was a god,” instead of, “The Word was God.” Their false translation makes Jesus a second-level god alongside the heavenly Father. Clearly, this teaching does not fit with Holy Scripture, which teaches that there is only one God! (Cf Is 45:18–21; see p 1815.)
At the time of creation, Wisdom said, “I was beside [God], like a master workman” (Pr 8:30). Passages in the NT attribute this to Christ, e.g., Col 1:15–17; firstborn in this passage is used in a specific sense. It does not mean the first child born into a family. Rather, it refers to the inheritance rights of the one who held the honors of a firstborn son. (E.g., King David is called “firstborn” in Ps 89:27, even though he was the youngest son in his family [1Sm 16:11–13]. In view of this, when Paul calls Jesus “the firstborn of all creation,” he means that Jesus rules all creation, not that He was created, for “all things were created through Him and for Him.”)
Faithful Christians in the Early Church, led by the great Church Father Athanasius, carefully studied Pr 8 and other passages of Holy Scripture. They recognized that while the Son of God is begotten, He is also co-eternal with God the Father. Out of this research into God’s Word came the Nicene Creed, by which Christians still confess faith in Jesus Christ as “the only-begotten Son of God, begotten of His Father before all worlds, God of God, Light of Light, very God of very God, begotten, not made, being of one substance with the Father, by whom all things were made.”
When we come face-to-face with the eternally begotten Son and other mysteries concerning the triune God, we are in realms beyond human comprehension. We can no more capture the eternal, omnipotent God within our minds than we can hold the ocean in a bucket. The wonder of it all is that the almighty Creator has come to us to save us. Jesus is God. He is also our Brother (Heb 2:11) who has suffered, died, and risen for us.

Clear through Christ
It is often said that the OT is revealed in the NT, while the NT is concealed in the OT. In other words, what is not entirely clear in the OT becomes clear in the light of the coming of Jesus the Christ. That is what has happened with Pr 8.
The NT explicitly states that Jesus is the one “in whom are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge” (Col 2:3). Or, as St Paul puts it in 1Co 1:24, Christ is “the wisdom of God.” As you read Proverbs, hear the voice of your Redeemer. As the “Word of God,” these are His words for you.

8:27–29 Provides a picture of the first three days of creation (Gn 1:3–10), placing Wisdom there from the creation of the heavens to the creation of the earth’s foundations. Wisdom saw it all, from the heights to the depths of creation.

8:27 circle. Cf Gn 1:7–8.

8:30–31 delight … rejoicing … rejoicing … delighting. Chiastic arrangement links the joy between the Lord and Wisdom to the joy between the Lord and humanity at creation. Ath: “In whom does the Father rejoice, except as seeing Himself in His own Image, which is His Word?” (NPNF 2 4:393).

8:30 beside Him. The universe was created by God’s Word, a powerful companion to His presence. God said, “Let there be,” and there was (Gn 1:3, 6, 9, 11, 14, 20, 24, 26). God spoke (wisdom), and things that never were came to be (Heb 11:3). like a master workman. More than just an observer, Wisdom crafted creation. Earlier, wisdom is depicted as a woman. However, in this poem (vv 22–31), the feminine imagery is replaced by a first-person address (“Me,” “I”) and depiction of wisdom as a “workman.” This points forward to the description of the man Jesus as God’s Wisdom in the NT. I was daily His delight. Wisdom, Christ, the Son of God, was and is an object of delight and pleasure for the Father (Mt 3:17). rejoicing before Him always. As the Father finds pleasure in the Son, the Son delights in His Father. The reciprocity within the Trinity is evident here as the close mutual relationship between Father and Son is clear (Mt 11:27; Lk 10:22; Jn 5:19–21). This could also refer to the Son’s daily pleasure in creation, which His Father declared good (Gn 1:31).

8:31 delighting in the children of man. As the creation account ends with the creation of mankind (Gn 1:26–28), so this poetic presentation of creation recalls Wisdom’s pleasure in seeing human beings created in God’s image (Gn 1:31; Ps 8:3–5).

8:32–36 Concluding address returns to the appeal of vv 1–21.

8:34 waiting beside my doors. In 5:8, Solomon counseled students not to go near the door of the adulterous woman. Here, though, they are encouraged to wait eagerly at Wisdom’s doorstep. Wisdom alone grants entry into her home.

8:35 life. The adulterous woman brings death (5:5; 7:27); Wisdom brings life (cf promises in Jn 3:16; 8:51; 10:10). favor. See p 6. Wisdom’s invitation, like that of Christ, is one that offers God’s favor (2Co 6:1–2; Lk 4:19).

8:36 all who hate me love death. Stakes are high where following Wisdom is concerned.

Ch 8 The Lord is our Wisdom. His words and atoning works call from the heights and the crossroads of life for all humanity to hear. Like Wisdom in ch 8, Christ calls us from worldly foolishness, judgment, and death to obedience, God’s favor, and abundant life. Christ’s eternal nature, His relationship with the Father, and His work in creation all mark Him as the very wisdom of God. As such, He hates the sins of pride, arrogance, evil, and perverted speech (v 13). He calls us to do the same (Rm 12:9). He reaches out in love to all who love Him and diligently seek Him. In Christ, our Wisdom, we are rich beyond any human measure! • Lord Christ, Your wisdom brings life. You favor both the great and the humble, rulers and children, calling us from foolish sins to righteousness and truth. When we have lost our way, You are the door to all that is good and right, noble and true. Lord, make us wise unto Your salvation, that by Your gracious wisdom we may truly live. In Your name. Amen.

Edward A. Engelbrecht, The Lutheran Study Bible (St. Louis, MO: Concordia Publishing House, 2009), 1010–1013.

_________

-Dan

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Milford Charles Murray | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Nov 12 2013 1:06 PM

Peace, Dan!         *smile*                       Thanks so much for sharing that!

Philippians 4:  4 Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 5 Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand..........

Posts 25
Scott E. Heitshusen | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 17 2013 10:48 AM

Can CPH or someone help inquire why this is taking so long to come out?

Posts 2964
tom | Forum Activity | Replied: Tue, Dec 17 2013 11:36 AM

Scott Heitshusen:

Can CPH or someone help inquire why this is taking so long to come out?

FYI... It is not uncommon for prepubs to take between one and two years to make it from "under contract" to being put into production.

Posts 25
Scott E. Heitshusen | Forum Activity | Replied: Wed, Dec 18 2013 2:46 PM

wow. that's just...wow...

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