Now can we have some Catholic workflows?

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MJ. Smith | Forum Activity | Posted: Thu, Jan 31 2019 1:24 PM

I'm thinking of things that don't require the multiple passages that are needed for liturgical/lectionary based studies:

  1. St. Augustine's Agapic Reading which is to apply to all reading not just Biblical reading: See "Agapic reading: How to read the Bible and other literature to enhance love for God and neighbor" by Dr. David Naugle
  2. The four senses of scripture. I like the form what does the text say, what am I to do, what am I to believe, what am I to hope for ... but I have mislaid the link.
  3. The Interpretation of the Bible in the Church, in a form such as that of Felix Just
  4. An Orthodox view: Bishop Kallistos Ware's frequently reprinted essay "How to Read the Bible
  5. A harder task - the five keys of Sri, Edward. The Bible Compass: A Catholic’s Guide to Navigating the Scriptures. West Chester, PA: Ascension Press, 2009.

That would provide a nice range of methods for the average Catholic. I know it doesn't meet the needs of many of the ordained but ...

Orthodox Bishop Hilarion Alfeyev: "To be a theologian means to have experience of a personal encounter with God through prayer and worship."

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These are all great suggestions MJ, thanks for sharing. 

The four senses of Scripture one you suggest jumps out at me.  We could even use the section in the Summa where Aquins talks about this as the basis for it.  That could be a backdoor way to get St. Thomas into a Workflow Big Smile since--right now--we can only use Scripture texts.

Craig St. Clair | Verbum Product Manager |

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Kevin Clemens | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 31 2019 8:17 PM

Craig St. Clair (Faithlife):

The four senses of Scripture one you suggest jumps out at me.  We could even use the section in the Summa where Aquins talks about this as the basis for it.  That could be a backdoor way to get St. Thomas into a Workflow Big Smile since--right now--we can only use Scripture texts.

Larry Feingold's recent primer on fundamental theology has an entire chapter devoted to the four senses (Ch 16) that relies heavily on Thomas (citing the ST, Quodlibet, and Comm. on Galatians). Feingold integrates the discussion of Thomistic texts with the Catechism's treatment of the senses (CCC 115-117) along with other patristic and magisterial texts. This may prove a helpful resource to have at hand in developing such a workflow.

A further thought would be to develop a workflow around the three criteria for the interpretation of Scripture outlined in Dei Verbum, 12 and summarized in CCC 112-114:

  1. "Be especially attentive “to the content and unity of the whole Scripture."
  2. "Read the Scripture within “the living Tradition of the whole Church.”
  3. "Be attentive to the analogy of faith."
Posts 280
Kevin Clemens | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Jan 31 2019 8:17 PM

Craig St. Clair (Faithlife):

The four senses of Scripture one you suggest jumps out at me.  We could even use the section in the Summa where Aquins talks about this as the basis for it.  That could be a backdoor way to get St. Thomas into a Workflow Big Smile since--right now--we can only use Scripture texts.

Larry Feingold's recent primer on fundamental theology has an entire chapter devoted to the four senses (Ch 16) that relies heavily on Thomas (citing the ST, Quodlibet, and Comm. on Galatians). Feingold integrates the discussion of Thomistic texts with the Catechism's treatment of the senses (CCC 115-117) along with other patristic and magisterial texts. This may prove a helpful resource to have at hand in developing such a workflow.

A further thought would be to develop a workflow around the three criteria for the interpretation of Scripture outlined in Dei Verbum, 12 and summarized in CCC 112-114:

  1. "Be especially attentive “to the content and unity of the whole Scripture."
  2. "Read the Scripture within “the living Tradition of the whole Church.”
  3. "Be attentive to the analogy of faith."
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