Looking for thoughts on: Raymond E. Brown Collection (5 vols.)

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This post has 23 Replies | 2 Followers

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David Wanat | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 16 2020 4:45 PM

In retrospect, thanks for pointing it out. I had no idea how harsh I sounded until I reread it. 🤦‍♂️

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Mattillo | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 16 2020 5:42 PM

Thank you everyone. I think I’ll pass on this one due to some strange views he is presenting. 

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Denise | Forum Activity | Replied: Mon, Mar 16 2020 7:54 PM

Now that Matillo has considered his options (I agree with DAL), there's 2 resources on March sale, in the critical-mold for others' consideration:

This one gets some kudos from surprising sources (eg Neusner). And it's being compared to Schweitzer's Quest:

https://www.logos.com/product/52868/a-myth-of-innocence-mark-and-christian-origins 

The second one looks directly at 'miracles' in the period surrounding Jesus. The question surrounds what a 1st century person would consider unusual (even Paul's dangerous opponents had 'the power').

https://www.logos.com/product/7957/the-jewish-context-of-jesus-miracles 

Both of these won't meet ones devotional needs, suffice it to say.

"God will save his fallen angels and their broken wings He'll mend."

Posts 3963
SineNomine | Forum Activity | Replied: Thu, Mar 19 2020 7:07 PM

From my perspective, which--I, too, am Catholic--is really not very friendly to the late Fr. Brown's school of thought, he is nonetheless necessary reading and makes many valuable points.

As a historical critical scholar, he was excellent, in his time. One of the best.

His exegesis does seem to have become more sympathetic to a traditional Catholic reading as he neared the end of his life.

Nonetheless, I read him not because I think he is always right, or because I think he was doing the right thing in general, but because he did a better job of what he was doing than just about anyone else doing it ever had done or has done since. I also highly doubt anyone--Catholic, Protestant, Orthodox, or Jewish--who could plausibly claim to be in his league would disagree with that assessment. He's decently readable, too.

How would I correct his work? Well, let me point you to Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger's 1988 essay on the subject, republished and available from Faithlife with the title "Biblical Interpretation in Conflict: On the Foundations and the Itinerary of Exegesis Today."

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